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1.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24326, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585785

ABSTRACT

We develop a site-bond percolation model, called PERCOVID, in order to describe the time evolution of all epidemics propagating through respiratory tract or by skin contacts in human populations. This model is based on a network of social relationships representing interconnected households experiencing governmental non-pharmaceutical interventions. As a very first testing ground, we apply our model to the understanding of the dynamics of the COVID-19 pandemic in France from December 2019 up to December 2021. Our model shows the impact of lockdowns and curfews, as well as the influence of the progressive vaccination campaign in order to keep COVID-19 pandemic under the percolation threshold. We illustrate the role played by social interactions by comparing two typical scenarios with low or high strengths of social relationships as compared to France during the first wave in March 2020. We investigate finally the role played by the α and δ variants in the evolution of the epidemic in France till autumn 2021, paying particular attention to the essential role played by the vaccination. Our model predicts that the rise of the epidemic observed in July and August 2021 would not result in a new major epidemic wave in France.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Interpersonal Relations , Models, Theoretical , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , France/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vaccination
2.
J Obstet Gynaecol Can ; 43(6): 690-692, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554367
3.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 33(11): 567, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505574
6.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(10): e1009321, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477507

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the world faced the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic that drastically altered people's lives. Since then, many countries have been forced to suspend public gatherings, leading to many conference cancellations, postponements, or reorganizations. Switching from a face-to-face to a remote conference became inevitable and the ultimate solution to sustain scientific exchanges at the national and the international levels. The same year, as a committee, we were in charge of organizing the major French annual conference that covers all computational biology areas: The "Journées Ouvertes en Biologie, Informatique et Mathématiques" (JOBIM). Despite the health crisis, we succeeded in changing the conference format from face to face to remote in a very short amount of time. Here, we propose 10 simple rules based on this experience to modify a conference format in an optimized and cost-effective way. In addition to the suggested rules, we decided to emphasize an unexpected benefit of this situation: a significant reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to travel for scientific conference attendance. We believe that even once the SARS-CoV-2 crisis is over, we collectively will have an opportunity to think about the way we approach such scientific events over the longer term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computational Biology , Congresses as Topic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Videoconferencing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Computational Biology/organization & administration , Feasibility Studies , France , Greenhouse Gases/analysis , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Teleworking , Travel
8.
Kennedy Inst Ethics J ; 31(3): 327-341, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440974

ABSTRACT

Crises illustrate the value of digital connectedness. When our physical routines are disrupted, having alternative options to connect with others is important. Yet there are clear divisions in access to the internet, and in the distribution of the skills required to take advantage of the internet. I argue that the COVID-19 pandemic is but one example of a more general idea; that everyone has a moral claim to internet access. We ought to use this opportunity to address the continued inequities in internet access and use amongst our population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet Access/ethics , Interpersonal Relations , Pandemics , Social Isolation , Social Justice , COVID-19/psychology , Digital Technology , Humans , Internet , Morals , Resilience, Psychological
9.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 77(8): 1139-1140, 2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440139
10.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257252, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Teaching work is stressful, moreover during the pandemic teachers' stress might have been intensified by distance education as well as by limited access to social support, which functions as a buffer in experiencing stress. The aim of the research was to investigate the relation between distance education and teachers' well-being, and their close relations and other social relations during the first two waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The research was conducted in two stages on 285 Polish primary and secondary school teachers who were recruited by means of the chain referral method. The following measures were used: The Depression Anxiety & Stress Scales-21, Berlin Social Support Scales, The Relationship Satisfaction Scale and The Injustice Experience Questionnaire. RESULTS: The teachers experienced at least mild levels of stress, anxiety and depression, both during the first as well as the second waves of the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland. It has been confirmed that there is a negative relation between relationship quality change and social relations quality change, and stress, anxiety and depression. The variables taken into consideration in the research have provided the explanation for the variation of stress-from 6% in the first stage of the research to 47% in the second stage; for the variation of anxiety-from 21% to 31%; and for the variation of depression-from 12% to 46%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The research results show that due to distance work the distinction between professional work and family life might have been blurred, and as a consequence teachers' well-being could have been worsened. The isolation put on to stop the spreading of the virus might have contributed to changes in social relations, in close relations in particular, and at the same time negatively influenced teachers' abilities to effectively cope with the crisis situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , School Teachers/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Education, Distance/methods , Female , Health Education/methods , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Mental Health , Personal Satisfaction , Poland , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Support , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Appetite ; 168: 105717, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432948

ABSTRACT

Physical distancing and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic may influence dietary behaviors. Using a parallel mixed method design, we examined the relationships between structural and perceived social relationships on dietary behaviors across the adult lifespan and by food security status. A representative sample of 360 adults (18-78 years old) living in the United States were recruited through Prolific Academic to complete an online cross-sectional survey. Participants provided data about demographics, food insecurity, structural and perceived social relationships, diet quality, and unhealthy snacking at the onset of the pandemic. Participants responded to open-ended questions about perceived changes in social connections and dietary behavior since COVID-19. Quantitative findings indicated food insecure emerging and older adults were at highest risk for low diet quality and frequent unhealthy snacking. Friend support was associated with higher diet quality. Qualitative findings suggested overall decreases in social connection and changes in dietary behavior, with food insecure adults describing decreases in diet quality. Participants who reported increases in emotional eating also reported decreases in social connection. Findings suggest the pandemic may exacerbate inequalities, particularly among food insecure emerging and older adults. Scaling up preventive interventions to increase social connection and reduce food insecurity during unprecedented challenges may promote healthier dietary behaviors now and in the long-term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Longevity , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
13.
Front Public Health ; 9: 728762, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405444

ABSTRACT

People constantly talk to one another about the past, and in so doing, they recount certain details while remaining silent about others. Collaborative or conversational remembering plays an important role in establishing shared representations of the past (e.g., the 911 attacks, Covid-19). According to the socially shared retrieval-induced forgetting (SS-RIF) effect, a listener will forget about relevant but unpracticed information during communication, due to intentional or unintentional selective retrieval of data by the speaker. The SS-RIF paradigm has been applied to explain how collective memory is shaped within the context of conversation/discourse. This study sought to determine if SS-RIF occurred only during face-to-face communication, or whether shared memories could be developed through other types of conversation quite common in modern society. We also investigated whether a level of social interaction in the real-world presence of others is a necessary condition for inducing SS-RIF, and if listeners experience different degrees of SS-RIF due to different levels of perceived social presence. We observed the SS-RIF phenomenon in listeners both in real life and video; the degree of forgetting was the same for the two conditions. These results indicate that social presence may not be associated with SS-RIF. Public silence affects the formation of collective memory regardless of the face-to-face presence of others, and thus physical presence is not necessary to induce SS-RIF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interpersonal Relations , Communication , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403597

ABSTRACT

Understanding the specific factors associated with poor health is critical to improve the health of homeless people. This study aimed to analyze the influence of personal variables, interpersonal relationships, and the influence of social services on the health of homeless people. A secondary analysis was applied to cross-sectional data from a sample of 1382 homeless people living in the Basque Country (Spain) (75.69% male). Multinomial logistic regression modelling was used to analyze the relationship between health and personal variables, interpersonal variables, perceived help and use of the social services. Relationships with the family, using a day center, and a sufficient and high perceived help of the social services were significant factors associated with good health. On the other hand, spending the day alone or using mental and health care services are associated with poor health. In the same way, the longer a person has been homeless, the worse their expected state of health is. Addressing housing exclusion, promoting interpersonal relationships, using a day center, and developing the use and perceived helpfulness of social services stand out as key factors in improving health status. Social policies are usually focused on housing. However, this paper also highlights the relevance of developing interpersonal relationships and using day centers to improve homeless people's health.


Subject(s)
Homeless Persons , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Housing , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Social Work
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403587

ABSTRACT

The higher quality of life of people with spinal cord injury is closely related with their reintegration into the social environment. Social reintegration is a demanding and complex process, requiring individuals to become active again and acquire age-, gender-, and culture-appropriate roles and social status. It also involves independence and productive behavior as part of multiple interpersonal relationships with family, friends, and others. In order to establish whether individuals with spinal cord injury who are physically active subjectively rate their quality of life to be higher compared to those who are not, sixty-two respondents from Slovenia with spinal cord injury were interviewed. Thirty-one of them were physically active, and 31 were not. The level of injury of the responders was from Th6-Th12. The participants gave the highest assessments to their interpersonal relationships, and the lowest to their satisfaction with material prosperity. Data comparison showed that subjective estimates in all areas of quality of life are higher in respondents who were involved in physical activity after their injury. The results may encourage persons with spinal cord injury to participate more often in sports programs, and also encourage others to do so.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Spinal Cord Injuries , Exercise , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Personal Satisfaction
18.
J Prev Alzheimers Dis ; 7(4): 294-298, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389817

ABSTRACT

Individuals experiencing brain aging, cognitive decline, and dementia are currently confronted with several more complex challenges due to the current Sars-Cov-2 pandemic as compared to younger and cognitively healthy people. During the first six months of the pandemic, we are experiencing critical issues related to the management of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. The evolving, highly contagious global viral spread has created a pressure test of unprecedented proportions for the existing brain health care infrastructure and related services for management, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Social distancing and lock-down measures are catalyzing and accelerating a technological paradigm shift, away from a traditional model of brain healthcare focused on late symptomatic disease stages and towards optimized preventive strategies to slow brain aging and increase resilience at preclinical asymptomatic stages. Digital technologies transform global healthcare for accessible equality of opportunities in order to generate better outcomes for brain aging aligned with the paradigm of preventive medicine.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/prevention & control , Cognitive Dysfunction/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections , Interpersonal Relations , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Isolation/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging , Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Disease Progression , Humans , Male , Quarantine/psychology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Technology
19.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0241163, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388892

ABSTRACT

The events of the recent SARS-CoV-2 epidemics have shown the importance of social factors, especially given the large number of asymptomatic cases that effectively spread the virus, which can cause a medical emergency to very susceptible individuals. Besides, the SARS-CoV-2 virus survives for several hours on different surfaces, where a new host can contract it with a delay. These passive modes of infection transmission remain an unexplored area for traditional mean-field epidemic models. Here, we design an agent-based model for simulations of infection transmission in an open system driven by the dynamics of social activity; the model takes into account the personal characteristics of individuals, as well as the survival time of the virus and its potential mutations. A growing bipartite graph embodies this biosocial process, consisting of active carriers (host) nodes that produce viral nodes during their infectious period. With its directed edges passing through viral nodes between two successive hosts, this graph contains complete information about the routes leading to each infected individual. We determine temporal fluctuations of the number of exposed and the number of infected individuals, the number of active carriers and active viruses at hourly resolution. The simulated processes underpin the latent infection transmissions, contributing significantly to the spread of the virus within a large time window. More precisely, being brought by social dynamics and exposed to the currently existing infection, an individual passes through the infectious state until eventually spontaneously recovers or otherwise is moves to a controlled hospital environment. Our results reveal complex feedback mechanisms that shape the dependence of the infection curve on the intensity of social dynamics and other sociobiological factors. In particular, the results show how the lockdown effectively reduces the spread of infection and how it increases again after the lockdown is removed. Furthermore, a reduced level of social activity but prolonged exposure of susceptible individuals have adverse effects. On the other hand, virus mutations that can gradually reduce the transmission rate by hopping to each new host along the infection path can significantly reduce the extent of the infection, but can not stop the spreading without additional social strategies. Our stochastic processes, based on graphs at the interface of biology and social dynamics, provide a new mathematical framework for simulations of various epidemic control strategies with high temporal resolution and virus traceability.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Models, Statistical , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Mutation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Quarantine/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Stochastic Processes , Time Factors
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