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1.
Psych J ; 12(3): 430-442, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233503

ABSTRACT

Increased time spent together and the lockdown resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic may have created new scenarios for marital conflict. We analyzed how home confinement affects avoidantly attached individuals': (a) resolution strategies to cope with couple conflict, (b) perception of partner's resolution strategies, and (c) overall relationship satisfaction. The sample comprised 549 individuals, divided into two subsamples: (a) the confined group, individuals confined with their partners (n = 275); and (b) the comparison group, coupled individuals from a dataset collected before the pandemic (n = 274). Results indicate that the proposed model works in different contexts (non-confinement and confinement situations), but there are some significant differences in the magnitude of some of the relationships between the variables, being stronger in the confinement group than in the comparison group. In the confined group, in individuals with avoidant attachment, withdrawal was associated with lower relationship satisfaction and a higher demand partner perceived to a higher extent than in the comparison group. This might explain the lower satisfaction with the relationship of the confined group. The different conflict resolution strategies of the couple mediated between avoidant attachment and relationship satisfaction in both groups (confined and comparison). It is concluded that individuals' attachment orientation is a key factor in how individuals experienced their close relationships during the confinement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Negotiating , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Sexual Partners , Pandemics , Object Attachment , Communicable Disease Control , Personal Satisfaction
2.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e072588, 2023 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242438

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: People with complex health and social needs often require care from different providers and services. Identifying their existing sources of support could assist with addressing potential gaps and opportunities for enhanced service delivery. Eco-mapping is an approach used to visually capture people's social relationships and their linkages to the larger social systems. As it is an emerging and promising approach in the health services field, a scoping review on eco-mapping is warranted. This scoping review aims to synthesise the empirical literature that has focused on the application of eco-mapping by describing characteristics, populations, methodological approaches and other features of eco-mapping in health services research. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review will follow the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology. From the date of database construction to 16 January 2023, the following databases in English will be searched: Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase, CINAHL Ultimate (EBSCOhost), Emcare (Ovid), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Ovid) and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Ovid) Study/Source of Evidence selection. The inclusion criteria consist of empirical literature that uses eco-mapping or a related tool in the context of health services research. Two researchers will independently screen references against inclusion and exclusion criteria using Covidence software. Once screened, the data will be extracted and organised according to the following research questions: (1) What research questions and phenomena of interest do researchers address when using eco-mapping? (2) What are the characteristics of studies that use eco-mapping in health services research? (3) What are the methodological considerations for eco-mapping in health services research? ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This scoping review does not require ethical approval. The findings will be disseminated through publications, conference presentations and stakeholder meetings. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/GAWYN.


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes , Health Services Research , Humans , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Databases, Factual , Interpersonal Relations , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic
3.
Acta sci., Health sci ; 44: e57231, Jan. 14, 2022.
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2317160

ABSTRACT

Aim of the present study was to assess physical activity, nutrition and psychological status of the population during lockdown due to covid-19. Online survey was conductedamong 534 participants within the age range of 16-78 years using convenient sampling. Participantsfrom varied regions within India and abroad were enrolled for the present study. Volunteered participants were solicited to take part in a survey that has to be carried out by filling an online questionnaire form available to them as a URL link in the invitation through WhatsApp/Messenger. The gathered data has been compiled, coded and cleaned using Microsoft Excel. Analysis has been carried out employing descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS 17.0.Majority of participants in the studied population showed significant change in their nutrition and physical activity status due to lockdown. Covid-19 lockdown did limit their daily activities. It also had impacted their psychological status.The current investigation accentuates the need to pursue suitable life style for the maintenance of optimum metabolism and physiology. Sticking to more regular timetable of meals, effective management of stress levels and continued physical activity during the quarantine and in all the following phases of living is desirable.


Subject(s)
Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Exercise/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Mental Health , Feeding Behavior/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep , Social Behavior , Pandemics/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Interpersonal Relations , Life Style
4.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 40(6): 1329-1340, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320670

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To examine surrogates' mental health, social support, and relationship with intended parents (IPs) during the COVID-19 pandemic from March 2020 to February 2022. METHODS: Data were collected between April 29, 2022 and July 31, 2022, at an academic IVF center in Canada using an 85-item online anonymous cross-sectional survey that included three standardized scales measuring mental health (PHQ-4), loneliness, and social support. Eligible surrogates actively involved in surrogacy during the study period received email invitations. RESULTS: The response rate was 50.3% (338/672); 320 submitted surveys were analyzed. Two-thirds (65%) of respondents experienced mental health concerns during the pandemic and were significantly less comfortable about seeking mental health support than those without concerns. Nonetheless, 64% were highly satisfied with their surrogacy experience; 80% received a high level of support from their IPs, and 90% reported a good relationship with them. The final hierarchical regression model identified five significant predictors, explaining 39.4% of the variance in PHQ-4 scores: a prior mental health history, COVID-19 impact on personal life, surrogacy satisfaction, loneliness, and social support. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 created an unprecedented challenge to surrogacy care, increasing surrogates' risk of experiencing mental health symptoms. Our data show that IP support and the surrogate-IP relationship were fundamentals to surrogacy satisfaction. The findings are relevant to fertility and mental health practitioners in identifying surrogates who are more susceptible to mental health challenges. Fertility clinics should ensure adequate psychological screening of surrogate candidates and proactively offer mental health support services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surrogate Mothers/psychology , Interpersonal Relations , COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Support
5.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285555, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320152

ABSTRACT

In recent years, couples have been affected by health measures related to COVID-19, a circumstance that forces us to examine couple interactions in terms of crucial variables of their functioning. In this sense, the present study aimed to examine the association between love, jealousy, satisfaction, and violence in young couples through network analysis. A total of 834 young people and adults between 18 and 38 years of age (Mean = 20.97, SD = 2.39) participated; 646 women (77.50%) and 188 men (22.50%), who completed the Sternberg's love scale (STLS-R), Brief Jealousy Scale (BJS), Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS) and Woman Abuse Screening Tool (WAST-2). A partial unregularized network was estimated using the ggmModSelect function. The Bridge Strength index was calculated because the aim was to identify the bridge nodes between the variables under study. The results reveal that two nodes of the love variable, Commitment, and Intimacy, had a direct and moderate relationship with the Satisfaction node. The latter is the central node in the network. However, in the male group, the most intense associations are in Satisfaction-Intimacy, Violence-Passion, Jealousy-Commitment. It is concluded that there are relevant connections between the nodes of the network, which invite further research on couple relationships after the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spouse Abuse , Adult , Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Jealousy , Interpersonal Relations , Love , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Personal Satisfaction
6.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 59(4)2023 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294158

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: COVID-19 patients are a psychologically vulnerable patient group who suffer from both physical symptoms and psychological problems. The present study is a psychoanalytic investigation of COVID-19 patients utilizing Lacan's desire theory. We aimed to explore the manner in which patients' desire is presented in their lived experience narratives and sought to discover factors which directly impacted on this process. Materials and Methods: In-depth semi-structural interviews were conducted with 36 COVID-19 patients in China. During each interview, participants narrated their lived experiences of COVID-19 infection. Emotions, metaphors, and behaviors in patient narratives were collated as the main points for psychoanalysis. Results: Our findings demonstrated that the desire for being a healthy person made patients emotionally sensitive to the social environment. Anxiety and obsessive behaviors emerged in the process, which reveals their desire for that which they lack. Furthermore, public fear with respect to COVID-19 was somehow converted to psychological pressure on COVID-19 patients. Thus, these patients attempted to "de-identify" their identity as "patients". Positive responses of COVID-19 patients to the external world included admiring medical personnel, government, and country, while negative responses included interpersonal conflicts or complaints about discrimination. Following the rules of the Other, COVID-19 patients were influenced by the Other's desire in constructing their own image of a healthy person. Conclusions: This study revealed COVID-19 patients' psychological need to rid themselves of the identity of "patient" at the individual and social level. Our findings have clinical implications in helping COVID-19 patients to reshape their identity and to live a normal life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychoanalysis , Humans , Psychoanalytic Theory , Psychoanalysis/methods , Interpersonal Relations , China
7.
J Fam Psychol ; 37(4): 497-506, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292057

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in substantial hardship for Black Americans, leading to increased stress and mental health difficulties. We used longitudinal data from the Protecting Strong African American Families (ProSAAF) intervention study to test the hypothesis that improved couple functioning following ProSAAF participation would serve as a constructed resilience resource during the pandemic, buffering the impact of elevated pandemic-related stressors on change in depressive symptoms. We found that COVID-19-related stress predicted change in depressive symptoms from prepandemic to during the pandemic, that ProSAAF predicted improved couple functioning, and that positive change in couple functioning buffered the impact of pandemic stressors on change in depressive symptoms. These effects resulted in a significant indirect buffering effect of ProSAAF on the association between COVID-19-related stress and change in depressive symptoms through its effects on change in couple functioning. The results suggest that relationship intervention may increase resilience to unanticipated community-wide stress and promote mental health. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Black or African American , COVID-19 , Interpersonal Relations , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Black or African American/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Depression/epidemiology
8.
Br J Soc Psychol ; 62(2): 1036-1055, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291773

ABSTRACT

While COVID-19 implications for prejudice have been investigated among adults in previous research, children's intergroup reactions to the pandemic and specifically how native children's contact behaviours with refugees might have changed after the pandemic has not been examined yet. Drawing on a unique longitudinal school dataset (N = 861, 5th graders, Mage reported at T1 = 10.38, SD = 0.68) collected before the onset of the pandemic (T1, pre-lockdown), after the onset of the pandemic (T2, post-lockdown), and 6 months after the post-lockdown (T3, follow-up) in Turkey, we examined how children's contact behaviour (positive and negative contact), contact motivation (self-efficacy and volition), as well as behavioural tendencies (approach and avoidance) have shifted during this period (2.5 years). We observed a consistent pattern of improvement in contact behaviours demonstrated by increases in positive contact variables and decreases in negative contact variables particularly from T1 to T2. The change in some positive contact variables was stable for 6 months, while negative contact and avoidance rapidly regressed to the baseline during the normalization period (T3). The boosting effect of the pandemic was particularly pronounced among children who displayed greater prejudice towards refugees before the pandemic. Findings contribute to the growing research literature delineating the potential benefits of COVID-19 at the collective level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Friends , Adult , Humans , Child , Interpersonal Relations , Communicable Disease Control , Prejudice
9.
Int Rev Psychiatry ; 35(1): 86-96, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305270

ABSTRACT

In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, a large number of employed individuals all over the world were obliged to work remotely during lockdown. This article focuses on the coping mechanisms which individuals used to manage this difficult situation, specifically the impact which loving and caring for pets had on the way in which people dealt with the challenges of the remote-working environment. Methodologically, this qualitative study used a phenomenological research design to understand the lived experience of the participants in the study. Ten qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with pet owners during the Covid-19 lockdown period in South Africa. The sample was recruited using purposeful and snowball sampling techniques. Data were analysed through content analysis while qualitative quality criteria were applied. Findings show pets supported their owners in many different ways during the pandemic and only the animal's presence supported the owners at home physically, psychologically and emotionally. They helped to reduce the stress of their owners and create a homely atmosphere. Pets played a specific role in providing love, companionship, strong emotional and affective bonds and by creating experiences of comfort, positive as well as negative distraction from work, and physical presence. The experience of love was one major aspect of the relationships between pets and humans. Conclusions are drawn and recommendations are given with regard to future research, highlighting how organisations and consultants can use the positive influences of pets in remote-working scenarios.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pets , Animals , Humans , Pets/psychology , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Interpersonal Relations
10.
Span J Psychol ; 26: e9, 2023 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304855

ABSTRACT

In recent years, researchers have begun to study the social consequences of conspiracy beliefs. However, little research has investigated the impact of conspiracy beliefs on interpersonal relationships. In this review, we draw attention to this issue by summarizing available empirical evidence and proposing potential social-psychological mechanisms to explain whether and why conspiracy theories affect interpersonal relationships. We firstly discuss that the attitude change that often accompanies the internalization of conspiracy beliefs might distance people's opinions and, consequently, erode their relationships. Furthermore, we argue that the stigmatizing value of conspiracy theories can negatively affect the evaluation of conspiracy believers and discourage others from getting close to them. Finally, we consider that the misperception of social norms associated with the acceptance of certain conspiracy narratives can lead conspiracy believers to engage in non-normative behavior. Others are likely to perceive such behavior negatively, resulting in diminished interpersonal interaction. We highlight the need for further research to address these issues, as well as the potential factors that may prevent relationships being eroded by conspiracy beliefs.


Subject(s)
Attitude , Interpersonal Relations , Humans
11.
J Appl Gerontol ; 42(5): 972-980, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303520

ABSTRACT

Older adults are reported to die by suicide at higher rates than the general population. Suicide desire among older adults is associated with pain, and pain experiences have been found to differ based on race. To investigate the relationship between pain and suicidal desire, 437 racially diverse older adults who receive home-based services (home-delivered meals) in the Southeastern region of the United States completed standardized measures of psychological pain, chronic physical pain, and suicidal desire. Results identified race moderated the relationship between pain and suicidal desire, indicating a stronger relationship between pain and suicidal desire among Black older adults than White older adults. Chronic physical pain (i.e., emotional burden) interacted with race to predict Perceived Burdensomeness (p = .011) and Thwarted Belongingness (p = .032). Greater attention to pain experiences among Black older adults is warranted, considering the impact of COVID-19 on racial/ethnic minorities' mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Aged , Race Factors , Interpersonal Relations , Suicide/psychology , Pain , Risk Factors
12.
Postgrad Med J ; 98(1161): 485-486, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302849
13.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 54: 102224, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279258
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278646

ABSTRACT

This is a narrative review addressing the topic of romantic infidelity, its causes and its consequences. Love is commonly a source of much pleasure and fulfillment. However, as this review points out, it can also cause stress, heartache and may even be traumatic in some circumstances. Infidelity, which is relatively common in Western culture, can damage a loving, romantic relationship to the point of its demise. However, by highlighting this phenomenon, its causes and its consequences, we hope to provide useful insight for both researchers and clinicians who may be assisting couples facing these issues. We begin by defining infidelity and illustrating the various ways in which one may become unfaithful to their partner. We explore the personal and relational factors that enhance an individual's tendency to betray their partner, the various reactions related to a discovered affair and the challenges related to the nosological categorization of infidelity-based trauma, and conclude by reviewing the effects of COVID-19 on unfaithful behavior, as well as clinical implications related to infidelity-based treatment. Ultimately, we hope to provide a road map, for academicians and clinicians alike, of what some couples may experience in their relationships and how can they be helped.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Love , Humans , Marriage , Causality , Personal Satisfaction , Interpersonal Relations
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258713

ABSTRACT

This article analyzes the representation of women in Chinese news reports about COVID-19 in order to examine the consequences of the pandemic on gender relations in China. It draws on the linguistic framework of appraisal theory for identifying evaluative language and takes Chinese news reports on the COVID-19 frontline in 2020 as the major data sources. The study finds that while the narrative about women's capacity in combating the virus, resolution in the face of adversity, and sense of responsibility help build a shared feeling of community to reconstruct the disturbed social order, the descriptions about the evaluation and feelings of female characters lead to undesirable outcomes in gender relations in China. Specifically, the newspapers' reports on COVID-19 mainly focus on group interests and accomplishments and overlook women's contributions in containing the pandemic. Meanwhile, the news reports devoted to constructing model female characters that highlight transcendent qualities place considerable pressure on everyday women. Furthermore, journalists tend to infuse their reports with gender bias when depicting women, including aesthetic appreciation of appearance and a focus on emotional reactions and domestic roles, which hinders the professional identity of women. This article sheds light on gender relations in China amid the pandemic, as well as the study of gender equality in media discourse.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Male , East Asian People , Sexism , Interpersonal Relations , Language
16.
J Speech Lang Hear Res ; 66(3): 1033-1050, 2023 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283808

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to gain a comprehensive understanding of participation situations that are challenging for people with communication problems, to provide input for the further development of potential items for the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB). METHOD: A purposive sampling strategy was used to include a diverse group of people with communication problems. Diaries were used as a sensitizing exercise for inductive in-depth interviews. In these interviews, elements of communicative participation situations (concepts) were elicited that participants themselves experienced as difficult because of their communication problem. A thematic content analysis was used to identify overarching themes. In addition, new items were formulated based on the raw codes of the transcripts and linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Activity and Participation domains to examine the distribution of items across the breadth of the construct of communicative participation. RESULTS: Eighteen interviews yielded 44 different concepts. They were clustered in six themes, which capture the person, location, topic, mode, moment, and pace of communication. In total, 103 new items measuring communicative participation were formulated. Most of these items relate to International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Activity and Participation domains "interpersonal interactions and relationships," "major life areas," and "community, social, and civic life." CONCLUSIONS: This study resulted in an overview of self-reported barriers in daily communicative participation experienced by people with communication problems. These communicative participation situations can be captured within 44 concepts, which are covered by six themes. Future work should investigate if the newly written items can be added to the CPIB. The concepts and the themes can be used in designing and delivering a participation-focused intervention for this population.


Subject(s)
Communication , Interpersonal Relations , Humans , Self Report
17.
Psychiatr Rehabil J ; 46(2): 109-116, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2269534

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine peer specialist role-related challenges and opportunities in adapting to a new model of service provision during and beyond the COVID-19 era. METHOD: This mixed-methods study analyzes data from a survey (n = 186) as well as in-depth interviews (n = 30) with certified peer specialists in Texas. RESULTS: Peers described facing several challenges related to COVID-19 service delivery (e.g., fewer options for providing peer support, issues with access to reliable technology) as well as challenges related to adapting to changes to the peer role (e.g., challenges supporting people in services' community resource needs, challenges building rapport with people in services virtually). However, results also indicate that a new model of service provision during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic presented peers with new opportunities to provide enhanced peer services, new career development opportunities, and new opportunities related to increased job flexibility. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Results suggest the importance of developing trainings on providing virtual peer support, increasing technological access for peers and individuals in services, and providing peers with flexible job options and resiliency-focused supervision. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Peer Group , Interpersonal Relations , Specialization
18.
J Surg Res ; 287: 149-159, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2288318

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the recruitment cycle for the 2021 Match was performed virtually. This Association for Surgical Education (ASE)-sponsored survey set out to study applicants' ability to assess the factors contributing to fit through video interviews. METHODS: An IRB-approved, online, anonymous survey was distributed to surgical applicants at a single academic institution and through the ASE clerkship director distribution list between the rank order list certification deadline and Match Day. Applicants used 5-point Likert-type scales to rate factors for importance to fit and their ease of assessment through video interviewing. A variety of recruitment activities were also rated by applicants for their perceived helpfulness in assessment of fit. RESULTS: One hundred and eighty-three applicants responded to the survey. The three most important factors for applicant fit were how much the program cared, how satisfied residents seem with their program, and how well residents get along. Resident rapport, diversity of the patient population, and quality of the facilities were hardest to assess through video interviews. In general, diversity-related factors were more important to female and non-White applicants, but not more difficult to assess. Interview day and resident-only virtual panels were the most helpful recruitment activities, while virtual campus tours, faculty-only panels, and a program's social media were the least helpful. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides valuable insight into the limitations of virtual recruitment for surgical applicants' perception of fit. These findings and the recommendations herein should be taken into consideration by residency program leadership to ensure successful recruitment of diverse residency classes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , Female , Pandemics , Interpersonal Relations , Personnel Selection , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Psychogeriatrics ; 23(2): 252-260, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Elderly homecare service users may reduce their level of social participation and interpersonal interactions due to physiological loss, which may lead to loneliness and depression over the years. However, there is a lack of research on loneliness among older people who use homecare services. The purpose of this study was to examine the factors influencing loneliness among older people using homecare services. METHODS: This is a longitudinal study conducted in communities in Central Taiwan, and data were collected using a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was first administered as a pre-test to obtain baseline information about the participants, and the same questionnaire was administered as a post-test after 6 months to follow-up. The pre- and post-test questionnaires included five sections, that is, participant demographics, Brief Symptom Rating Scale, Interpersonal Interaction Scale (IIS), Frenchay Activities Index, and UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA). RESULTS: A total of 178 participants were recruited in this study. Results indicated that gender, whether participants eat alone or with others at dinner, social media use, perceived economic status, and IIS score were significantly correlated with the loneliness score on the UCLA. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the loneliness score among male participants in the low loneliness group from baseline to 6 months follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Gender, presence of others at dinner, social media use, perceived economic status, and interpersonal interaction skills are significant factors that influence loneliness among older people using homecare services. Men tend to experience higher levels of loneliness over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Loneliness , Humans , Male , Aged , Pandemics , Longitudinal Studies , Interpersonal Relations
20.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0282744, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2267243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Thousands of Eastern Europeans find employment caring for older individuals as transmigrating live-in home care workers in private households in Germany. Studies have shown that the stressors threatening their well-being are multifaceted and include inequalities and a high practical and emotional workload, but research on protective factors is still scarce. AIM & METHODS: This qualitative descriptive study focuses on both the stressors and factors that promote care workers' well-being and contribute to their psychological resilience. In guideline-based interviews, 14 female and one male care workers were asked about their stressors and the factors that help them cope. RESULTS: Identified stressors included separation from their own family, strained relationship with either or both the care recipient (dementia) and their relatives (violation of worker´s rights and devaluation of care work), and permanent availability and lack of free time due to a 24-h care schedule. Resilience factors were both external and internal and included positive social relationships, self-determination, experience in care work, and intrinsic job motivation. CONCLUSION: Live-ins reside in an ambiguous setting, exposed to both structural and individual strains. However, external and internal resilience factors contribute to a generally positive attitude toward their job and indicate the agency of this precariously employed group. A socially anchored appreciation of their work and an officially controlled expansion of free time are mandatory to improve the working conditions of live-in care workers.


Subject(s)
Home Care Services , Transients and Migrants , Humans , Male , Female , Protective Factors , Interpersonal Relations , Germany
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