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1.
Health Expect ; 25(6): 2950-2959, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2136850

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare is witnessing a new disease with the emergence of Long Covid; a condition which can result in myriad symptoms, varying in frequency and severity. As new data are emerging to help inform treatment guidelines, the perspectives of those living with Long Covid are essential in informing healthcare practice. The research aimed to collect the narratives of people living with Long Covid to better understand the lived experience of this condition. In attempting to narrate complex or traumatic experiences the arts and humanities can offer alternative ways of expressing embodied narratives, representing rich sources of meaning. Therefore, the research specifically sought to elicit creative expressions from participants with lived experience of Long Covid. METHODS: Data were collected via an online repository where participants could submit their pieces of creative writing. Data were collected between August 2021 and January 2022 and a total of 28 submissions were received from participants. These were mostly written creative narratives. However, a small number were submitted as audio or video files of spoken word poetry or songs. Data collection was stopped once data saturation was achieved. RESULTS: The submissions were subjected to thematic analysis and five themes were generated. These five themes are Identity, social relationships, symptoms, interaction with healthcare systems and time. The results provide an insight into the experience of Long Covid as detailed by the participants' creative narratives. CONCLUSION: The results from this study provide a unique insight into the lived experience of Long Covid. In relation to clinical practice, the results suggest that adjustment reaction and loss of sense of self could be added as common symptoms. PATIENT AND PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Before undertaking the research, Long Covid community groups were contacted to discuss the potential value of this study and it was widely supported. One of the leading Long Covid support groups was also involved in disseminating information regarding the project. As part of ongoing work within this project, members of the team are actively disseminating the results within Long Covid communities and seeking to develop arts-based workshops specifically for people with Long Covid.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Narration , Writing , Interpersonal Relations
2.
Lancet ; 400(10359): 1171, 2022 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2120971
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090138

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: This study aimed to assess the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on athletes' and coaches' experiences. Following the Dualistic Model of Passion and the Self-determination Theory, the objectives of this study were to investigate whether the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions affected athletes' and coaches' passion experiences, emotional experiences and basic psychological needs while engaging in their sport activities. Furthermore, the relationship between passion and emotional experiences as well as between passion and the basic psychological needs were explored; (2) Methods: 87 coach-athlete dyads, active at the recreational or competitive level in an individual sport, participated in the study. Using a cross-sectional dyadic design, athletes and coaches reported separately on their passion experience, emotional experiences and basic psychological needs in the previous two weeks; (3) Results: In total, 30 dyads were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, while 57 were not. Athletes' obsessive passion as well coaches' negative affect were larger in impacted dyads, while athletes' positive affect was lower in that group compared to the not-impacted group. Moderated Actor-Partner Interdependence Models revealed that coaches' obsessive passion was more strongly related to their negative affect in coach-athlete dyads that were not impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic than in dyads that were impacted. Furthermore, the harmonious passion of coaches was more strongly associated with athletes' need satisfaction and need frustration in impacted dyads, while also the athletes' harmonious passion in impacted dyads was more strongly associated with coaches' need satisfaction; (4) Conclusions: Less positive outcomes and more negative outcomes were observed in both athletes and coaches that were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. On the other hand, the COVID-19 pandemic may have suppressed the negative effects of coaches' obsessive passion on their negative affect, but strengthened the positive impact of coaches' harmonious passion on the athletes' need satisfaction and vice versa.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Interpersonal Relations , Athletes/psychology
4.
Health Psychol ; 41(11): 843-852, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077007

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Abundant evidence has linked everyday discrimination with health risks. Because the COVID-19 pandemic has increased exposure to discrimination (e.g., based on age and race), it is important to understand the day-to-day implications of discrimination experiences for well-being. Furthermore, daily positive events were examined as a moderator due to their potential for mitigating the associations between everyday discrimination and well-being. METHOD: From March to August 2020, 1,212 participants aged 18-91 in the United States and Canada (84% women, 75% White) completed surveys for seven consecutive evenings about everyday discrimination, positive events, physical health symptoms, and positive and negative affect. Data were analyzed using multilevel models and controlled for sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: Everyday discrimination was reported on 9.3% of days when in-person or remote social interactions occurred. Within-persons, positive affect was lower and negative affect and physical symptoms were higher on days when discrimination occurred versus on days without discrimination. Positive events mitigated the within-person association between everyday discrimination and same-day negative affect, but not for positive affect or physical symptoms. Discrimination perceived to be due to age was associated with higher negative affect and lower positive affect within-persons. Positive events did not moderate the associations between age-based discrimination and same-day outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Everyday discrimination was related to lower daily positive affect and higher negative affect and physical symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study provides initial evidence that daily positive events partially offset the increased negative affect associated with same-day discrimination. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065990

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study explores changes in couples' relationships during the COVID-19 pandemic, and analyzes the differences in the changes across three types: positive communication, criticism/defense, and demand/withdrawal. METHOD: A total of 600 (567 valid) Chinese respondents participated in this study, and a questionnaire was utilized to determine changes in their overall relationship, verbal and nonverbal communication, emotion, and activities with their spouses. RESULTS: The average score of items related to positive communication is higher, compared with that of negative communication. Compared with the other two types of relationships, respondents with positive communication scored highest on all items related to positive communication and lowest on all items related to negative communication. Significant differences were noted between the positive communication types and the others. CONCLUSIONS: Results show that the relationships of couples included in this study have improved during the current pandemic. Therefore, improved consistency in the type of intimacy can lead to improved quality of couples' relationships during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Sexual Partners/psychology , Spouses/psychology
6.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 732, 2022 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043118

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To compare the rate of postpartum depression (PPD) during the first COVID-19 lockdown with the rate observed prior to the pandemic, and to examine factors associated with PPD. METHODS: This was a prospective study. Women who gave birth during the first COVID-19 lockdown (spring 2020) were offered call-interviews at 10 days and 6-8 weeks postpartum to assess PPD using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Post-traumatic symptoms (Perinatal Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Questionnaire, PPQ), couple adjustment, and interaction and mother-to-infant bonding were also evaluated. The observed PPD rate was compared to the one reported before the pandemic. Factors associated with an increased risk of PPD were studied. The main outcome measures were comparison of the observed PPD rate (EPDS score > 12) to pre-pandemic rate. RESULTS: Of the 164 women included, 27 (16.5% [95%CI: 11.14-23.04]) presented an EPDS score > 12 either at 10 days or 6-8 weeks postpartum. This rate was similar to the one of 15% reported prior to the pandemic (p = 0.6). Combined EPDS> 12 or PPQ > 6 scores were observed in 20.7% of the mothers [95%CI: 14.8-0.28]. Maternal hypertension/preeclampsia (p = 0.007), emergency cesarean section (p = 0.03), and neonatal complications (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with an EPDS> 12 both in univariate and multivariate analysis (OR = 10 [95%CI: 1.5-68.7], OR = 4.09[95%CI: 1.2-14], OR = 4.02[95%CI: 1.4-11.6], respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of major PPD in our population did not increase during the first lockdown period. However, 20.7% of the women presented with post-traumatic/depressive symptoms. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT04366817.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Depression, Postpartum , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Mother-Child Relations , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023633

ABSTRACT

The research was conducted in a particular context, the recent pandemic. It is a comparative study of the methods and quality of communication in global companies between 2021 and 2022. The corporations involved in the research are important providers of flexible production, quality, and logistics solutions that cover customers' real needs. They are active in the automotive industry and units involved in mass production in the electronics industry, household appliances, and cosmetics industries. In their case, it was noted that to achieve operational objectives such as developing employee skills, using advanced technologies, and exceeding customer expectations, it is important to use innovative methods and tools such as single platforms, which allow access to the most important information from a distance, anywhere, anytime. It is significant that, according to the research, the preferred method of communication by employees, regardless of the existing conditions, is face-to-face. Primarily, this method is chosen because it provides an open area of interpersonal interaction. The participants observe non-verbal attitudes or can perceive emotions and feelings. Their personality can be identified through unintentional contact to obtain constructive feedback through guidance and counseling. Moreover, it can be formed and develop productive, intentional connections. Stakeholders' efficient and effective open dialogs are encouraged in this sense.


Subject(s)
Communication , Teleworking , Emotions , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Romania
8.
Am J Nurs ; 122(9): 64, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2018179

ABSTRACT

A psych nurse worries about the limits of virtual rapport with patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Interpersonal Relations , Humans
9.
J Affect Disord ; 317: 3-4, 2022 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996302

ABSTRACT

Suicide is a leading cause of death around the world. Prior to Covid-19 suicide was the tenth overall leading cause of death in the United States, and the second overall amongst adolescents and young adults with a disproportiante impact on ethnic and social minority groups. Despite its unfortunate prevalence much remains to be learned about the underlying neurobiological factors implicated in death by suicide. From a psycho-social perspective, the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (Joiner, 2007; Van Orden et al., 2010) posits three necessary factors leading to suicidal desire and behaviours, namely thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and an acquired capacity for self-injury. Given the universality of suicidal behaviours, this theory should be applicable across both cultures and eras. In this article I aim to apply the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide to one of the most famous literary deaths by suicide, that of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Adolescent , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Psychological Theory , Risk Factors , Suicidal Ideation , United States , Young Adult
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987773

ABSTRACT

Interpersonal communication is beneficial in promoting individuals' tendency to accept health-campaign-targeted behavior. Based on the protective action decision model, this study investigated the key factors underlying individual's interpersonal communication on the Gongkuai campaign, which was carried out during Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The main goal of the Gongkuai campaign was to change traditional communal eating habits and reduce public health risks. An online questionnaire survey involving 618 respondents was conducted in China after the 2020 Gongkuai campaign propagated, and the data were analyzed by using the structural equation modeling technique. The results indicated that health campaign exposure is a critical determinant of perceived campaign-related knowledge and health risk perception, which are significant predictors of interpersonal communication. Meanwhile, campaign-related knowledge can elicit risk perception. Furthermore, campaign exposure influenced interpersonal communication in ways that traditional diet culture did not predict. Risk perception was also unaffected by traditional diet culture. It is worth noting that individuals' agreement with traditional diet culture does not hinder health campaign-generated interpersonal communication in the context of public health crisis. Based on the findings, theoretical and policy implications for motivating interpersonal communication were discussed, and research limitations were pointed out.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interpersonal Relations , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Diet , Health Promotion/methods , Humans
11.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 141, 2022 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951374

ABSTRACT

Mental health conditions related to trauma among American children are a concern, particularly because of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Children, as students, carry the trauma they encounter with them into the classroom. Students impacted by trauma learn differently due to effects on the brain that relate to several impairments, causing them to perform poorly in school. However, teachers may not always understand this issue. This case study shows how certain dynamics within the EST layers impacted one school during the pandemic. The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers at the school experienced a trauma-informed online PD and SEL program intended to improve student outcomes, teacher perceptions, and teacher-student relationships. The six participants included teachers in a K-8 low-income, minority population charter school. The assessment tools used were the Teacher-Student Relationship Scale, Teacher Perception Scale, and Student Outcomes Survey. The teachers' outlook on SEL improved, particularly online. This improvement helped the teachers implement community circles and SEL infused with mindfulness in their online classrooms, which may have helped them maintain their relationships with the students and may have helped the students with academic and stress outcomes. During unprecedented times, the maintenance, rather than the deterioration, of student outcomes and teacher-student relationships is an accomplishment and an area that necessitates further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Ecosystem , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Pandemics , Students/psychology
12.
Health Place ; 76: 102844, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1945039

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We extend previous research to illustrate how individual, interpersonal and neighbourhood factors in a high-density urban setting in Vancouver, Canada, shape social connectedness experiences of community-dwelling older adults during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted 31 semi-structured interviews and collected objective measures of loneliness and social connectedness (surveys). RESULTS: Three dimensions of the neighbourhood environment influenced social connectedness: (i) interactions with neighbours, (ii) involvement with neighbourhood-based organizations, and (ii) outdoor pedestrian spaces. Seventy-one percent of participants felt a strong sense of belonging to their local community, while 39% were classified as high or extremely lonely. SUMMARY: Many participants leveraged pre-existing social ties to maintain connections during the pandemic. However, volunteer outreach was vital for more isolated older adults. Although many participants felt lonely and isolated at times, the relative ease and accessibility with which they could connect with others in their neighbourhood environment, may have helped mitigate persistent loneliness. CONCLUSION: Strategies that foster social connectedness over the longer term, need to prioritize the needs of older adults who face multiple barriers to equitable social participation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Loneliness , Residence Characteristics , Social Isolation
14.
Psychol Sci ; 33(8): 1313-1327, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1927996

ABSTRACT

Decades of research from across the globe highlight unequal and unfair division of household labor as a key factor that leads to relationship distress and demise. But does it have to? Testing a priori predictions across three samples of individuals cohabiting with a romantic partner during the COVID-19 pandemic (N = 2,193, including 476 couples), we found an important exception to this rule. People who reported doing more of the household labor and who perceived the division as more unfair were less satisfied across the early weeks and ensuing months of the pandemic, but these negative effects disappeared when people felt appreciated by their partners. Feeling appreciated also appeared to buffer against the negative effects of doing less, suggesting that feeling appreciated may offset the relational costs of unequal division of labor, regardless of who contributes more. These findings generalized across gender, employment status, age, socioeconomic status, and relationship length.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Satisfaction , Emotions , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Pandemics , Sexual Partners
15.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0270260, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Owing to the COVID-19 outbreak, older adults living alone, who can only connect socially outside their homes, are at risk of social isolation and poor mental health. This study aimed to identify the changes, before and after COVID-19, by sex and age, in social relationships (social activity, social network, and social support) and mental health (depression and suicide ideation) among older adults living alone. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older adults who were at least 65 years old and living alone in South Korea. The study was conducted during 2018-2020 with 2,291 participants (795, 771, and 725 for the 1st to 3rd waves, respectively). The data were collected via face-to-face interviews. A generalized linear mixed modeling framework was used to test for changes over three years. RESULTS: Social activity was reduced after the COVID-19, with an interaction effect of sex: older women (odds ratio [OR], 0.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.23; p < .001) showed greater reduction than older men (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.34-0.75; p < .001). Interaction with neighbors also reduced after the pandemic, but there was no significant evidence of interaction effects. Interaction with family members increased in both sexes during the pandemic, with the interaction effect of sex: older women (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.11-1.76; p = .004) showed greater increase than men (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.13-2.14; p = .007). Social support increased in both sexes during the pandemic, but there was no significant evidence of interaction effects. Depression and suicide ideation showed no significant differences before and after the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide health administrators and health providers with explorative insights into the impact of the COVID-19 on social relationships and mental health among older adults living alone and can guide further studies of interventions considering specific properties of social relationships.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Home Environment , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Prospective Studies
16.
Psychol Rev ; 129(3): 586-602, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1908110

ABSTRACT

Our life is built around coordinating efforts with others. This usually involves incentivizing others to do things and sustaining our relationship with them. Using the wrong incentives backfires: it lowers effort and tarnishes our relationships. But what constitutes a "wrong" incentive? And can incentives be used to shape relationships in a desired manner? To address these and other questions, we introduce relational incentives theory, which distinguishes between two aspects of incentives: schemes (how the incentive is used) and means (what is used as an incentive). Prior research has focused on means (e.g., monetary vs. nonmonetary incentives). Our theory highlights the importance of schemes, with a focus on how they interact with social relationships. It posits that the efficacy of incentives depends largely on whether the scheme fits the relational structure of the persons involved in the activity: participation incentive schemes for communal sharing relations, hierarchy for authority ranking relations, balancing for equality matching relations, and proportional incentive schemes for market pricing relations. We show that these four schemes encompass some of the most prevalent variants of incentives. We then discuss the antecedents and consequences of the use of congruent and incongruent incentive schemes. We argue that congruent incentives can reinforce the relationship. Incongruent incentives disrupt relational motives, which undermines the coordinating relationship and reduces effort. But, importantly, incongruent incentives can also be used intentionally to shift to a new relational model. The theory thus contributes to research on relational models by showing how people constitute and modulate relationships. It adds to the incentives and contracting literatures by offering a framework for analyzing the structural congruence between incentives and relationships, yielding predictions about the effects of incentives across different organizational and individual-level contexts. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Group Processes , Motivation , Humans , Interpersonal Relations
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892876

ABSTRACT

This study looks into the relationship between mental health and social exclusion scenarios, paying special attention to employment-related factors. Previous studies have shown the relationship between mental health, social exclusion and poverty. For this study, authors have used data from the VIII Report on social development and exclusion in Spain, with a sample of 11,655 households. The SPSS Statistics programme was used for statistical analysis. Several factors that could pose a risk or be a protection for the presence of mental health conditions were designed. By means of a binary logistic regression the impact of these factors on mental health issues was scored. The results show that a deteriorated social network and a negative interpretation of reality are the most influential factors related to the presence of mental health conditions in a given household. On the contrary, positive social relationships protect households and function as a support when mental health conditions are already present. Thus, the support of positive and committed social relationships is a key element to protect the mental health of households.


Subject(s)
Employment , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Employment/psychology , Interpersonal Relations , Protective Factors
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884117

ABSTRACT

An emergent body of evidence shows the impact of exposure to nature on prosocial attitudes and interpersonal relationships. This study examines relationships between green space (GS) attendance, perceived beauty of the space, perceived crowdedness of the space, and prosocial behavior. A cross-sectional study with snowball sampling was conducted in April 2020. All participants (N = 1206) responded to an online survey that included a French version of the social value orientation slider measure (used as a proxy for prosocial behavior), questions about the lockdown, and their GS attendance. After retaining only participants who had visited a GS at least once since the beginning of their lockdown (N = 610), multiple linear regressions showed that social orientation scores demonstrated associations with the interaction between GS attendance and perceived crowdedness of the GS, suggesting that attending low crowded GS is linked to increasing prosociality. These results provide insight into the roles that GS can have during a health crisis and suggest some practical implications.


Subject(s)
Altruism , Parks, Recreational , Beauty , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Interpersonal Relations
19.
Dev Med Child Neurol ; 64(7): 810-811, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868589
20.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0264614, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865338

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Novel infectious diseases have the potential to both strengthen or weaken interpersonal relationships within a society. In a collectivist setting such as Thailand amplification of relationships may be particularly marked, but may be associated with individual factors, including personal values and perceived control over the virus. METHODS: A national on-street survey in Thailand (April 2020, N = 1,000), collected data from five regions across the country (response rate 82.6%). Participants reported demographics, anxiety, perceived control, and personal values of security and universalism, and indicated changes, from negative to positive, across four relationship types (relationship partners, family, friendships and neighbourhood). RESULTS: While relationship changes were small overall, there was an improvement in close relations (partners, family members) but not amongst friends and neighbours. Respondents who were married without children recorded less enhancement of partnerships, friendships and neighbourhood relations. Those with less perceived control over the infection reported relationship decline, while single people reported fewer positive changes in their partnership or family relations. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated the prioritisation of security was associated with a decline in each of the relationships, while universalism was positively associated with change in the family, in friendships and neighbourly relations. CONCLUSIONS: Personal values and marital status may impact on relationship functioning during a national health crisis. These issues should be considered by clinicians and health practitioners when trying to assist those struggling with interpersonal relations during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Friends , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Thailand/epidemiology
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