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1.
Health Expect ; 25(4): 1619-1632, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961577

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: British Pakistani women have exceptionally high rates of obesity and yet are seldom heard in a research priority setting concerning weight management. The objectives of this study were (i) to ascertain what multisectoral professionals perceive to be the most pressing unmet obesity needs or topic areas that need more research in relation to Pakistani women living in deprived areas of Bradford and (ii) to determine the top 10 obesity health priorities for this group to develop an obesity research agenda. METHODS: A two-step process was adopted using the following: (i) a survey of a wide range of multisectoral professional stakeholders (n = 159) and (ii) a ranking exercise involving Pakistani women living in deprived areas of Bradford (n = 32) to select and prioritize their top 10 obesity health concerns and unmet needs from a list of 31 statements identified in the survey and previous research. Survey data were analysed using inductive content analysis and themes were identified. Themes were translated into statements to be ranked by Pakistani women. The ranking exercise was conducted by telephone either via voice or video call. Data were analysed using a reverse scoring system. RESULTS: Survey responses were grouped into statements reflecting the following three categories: education needs; healthy behaviour barriers and mental well-being. The highest rankings were given by Pakistani women to statements on mental health and the need for education. The top 10 prioritized statements were developed with members of the public into an obesity research agenda that reflected the target population. CONCLUSION: Actively engaging British Pakistani women in setting research priorities provided a unique opportunity to understand the key areas they think are important for future research. The culminating research agenda can be used by researchers to advance the field of obesity research in Pakistani communities, thus producing research outputs that are relevant to and have impact in this population. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Participants in the ranking exercise collected data. Public contributors were involved in developing the prioritized statements into a research agenda.


Subject(s)
Health Priorities , Health Services Needs and Demand , Health Services Research , Obesity , Poverty Areas , Social Determinants of Health , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Priorities/organization & administration , Health Services Research/methods , Health Services Research/organization & administration , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/therapy , Pakistan/ethnology , Social Determinants of Health/statistics & numerical data , Stakeholder Participation , United Kingdom/epidemiology
2.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(6)2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901985

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Civil-military cooperation (CMC) in infectious disease outbreak responses has become more common, and has its own cooperation dynamics. These collaborations fit WHO's call for multisectoral cooperation in managing health emergencies according to the emergency management cycle (EMC). However, the literature on CMC on this topic is fragmented. The core aim of this review is to understand the breadth and dynamics of this cooperation by using the EMC as a framework and by identifying challenges and opportunities in the management of outbreaks. METHODS: A scoping review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Extension for Scoping Reviews guideline was conducted. A systematic search for peer-reviewed journals was performed in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Scopus. Eligible papers addressed substantive contributions to the understanding of CMC. Papers were categorised by EMC phase and relevant information on study characteristics and areas of cooperation were extracted from the data. Recurring themes on challenges and opportunities in cooperation were identified by means of qualitative interpretation analysis. RESULTS: The search resulted in 8360 papers; 54 were included for analysis. Most papers provided a review of activities or expert opinions. CMC was described in all EMC phases, with the fewest references in the recovery phase (n=1). In total, eight areas of CMC were explored. Regarding the better understanding of cooperative dynamics, the qualitative analysis of the papers yielded five recurring themes covering challenges and opportunities in CMC: managing relations, framework conditions, integrating collective activities, governance and civil-military differences. CONCLUSION: Guided by these five themes, successful CMC requires sustainable relations, binding agreements, transparency, a clear operational perspective and acknowledgement of organisational cultural differences. Early and continuous engagement proves crucial to avoid distrust and tension among stakeholders, frequently caused by differences in strategical goals. Original research on this topic is limited.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks , Intersectoral Collaboration , Military Personnel , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans
3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 825328, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776024

ABSTRACT

Background: The game of interest is the root cause of the non-cooperative competition between urban and rural medical and health institutions. The study investigates competition and cooperation among urban and rural medical institutions using the evolutionary game analysis. Methods: With the evolutionary game model, analysis of the stable evolutionary strategies between the urban and rural medical and health facilities is carried out. A numerical simulation is performed to demonstrate the influence of various values. Results: The result shows that the cooperation mechanism between urban and rural medical Institutions is relevant to the efficiency of rural medical institutions, government supervision, reward, and punishment mechanism. Conclusions: Suggestions for utilizing the government's macro regulation and control capabilities, resolving conflicts of interest between urban and rural medical and health institutions is recommended. In addition, the study again advocates mobilizing the internal power of medical institutions' cooperation to promote collaboration between urban and rural medical and health institutions.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Rural Health Services , Urban Health Services , China , Game Theory , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Punishment
4.
Elife ; 102021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662832

ABSTRACT

Employing concepts from physics, chemistry and bioengineering, 'learning-by-building' approaches are becoming increasingly popular in the life sciences, especially with researchers who are attempting to engineer cellular life from scratch. The SynCell2020/21 conference brought together researchers from different disciplines to highlight progress in this field, including areas where synthetic cells are having socioeconomic and technological impact. Conference participants also identified the challenges involved in designing, manipulating and creating synthetic cells with hierarchical organization and function. A key conclusion is the need to build an international and interdisciplinary research community through enhanced communication, resource-sharing, and educational initiatives.


Subject(s)
Artificial Cells , Bioengineering/methods , Bioengineering/statistics & numerical data , Bioengineering/trends , Intersectoral Collaboration , Organelles/physiology , Synthetic Biology/trends , Forecasting , Humans
6.
Public Health Rep ; 137(2): 213-219, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643031

ABSTRACT

From May through July 2020, Arizona was a global hotspot for new COVID-19 cases. In response to the surge of cases, local public health departments looked for innovative ways to form external partnerships to address their staffing needs. In collaboration with the Maricopa County Department of Public Health, the Arizona State University Student Outbreak Response Team (SORT) created and implemented a virtual call center to conduct public health case investigations for COVID-19. SORT officially launched a dedicated COVID-19 case investigation program after 3 weeks of program design and training. From June 29 through November 8, 2020, SORT recruited and trained 218 case investigators, completed 5000 case patient interviews, and closed 10 000 cases. Our team also developed process improvements to address disparities in case investigation timeliness. A strong infrastructure designed to accommodate remote case investigations, paired with a large workforce, enabled SORT to provide additional surge capacity for the county's high volume of cases. University-driven multidisciplinary case investigator teams working in partnership with state, tribal, and local public health staff members can be an effective tool for supporting a diverse and growing public health workforce. We discuss the essential design factors involved in building a university program to complement local COVID-19 response efforts, including workflows for case management, volunteer case investigator recruitment and training, secure technology platforms for conducting case investigations remotely, and robust data-tracking procedures for maintaining quality control and timely case reporting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Call Centers/organization & administration , Contact Tracing/methods , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Intersectoral Collaboration , Program Development , Program Evaluation , Arizona/epidemiology , Humans , Public Health Practice , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Universities , Volunteers , Workforce/organization & administration
7.
Public Health Rep ; 137(2): 226-233, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643027

ABSTRACT

For more than 30 years, the network of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded Prevention Research Centers (PRCs) has worked with local communities and partners to implement and evaluate public health interventions and policies for the prevention of disease and promotion of health. The COVID-19 pandemic tested the PRC network's ability to rapidly respond to multiple, simultaneous public health crises. On April 28, 2020, to assess the network's engagement with activities undertaken in response to the early phase of the pandemic, PRC network leadership distributed an online survey to the directors of 34 currently or formerly funded PRCs, asking them to report their PRCs' engagement with predetermined activities across 9 topical areas and provide case studies exemplifying that engagement. We received responses from 24 PRCs, all of which reported engagement with at least 1 of the 9 topical areas (mean, 5). The topical areas with which the greatest number of PRCs reported engagement were support of frontline agencies (21 of 24, 88%) and support of activities related to health care (21 of 24, 88%). The mean number of activities with which PRCs reported engagement was 11. The PRCs provided more than 90 case studies exemplifying their work. The results of the survey indicated that the PRCs mobilized their personnel and resources to support the COVID-19 response in less than 6 weeks. We posit that the speed of this response was due, in part, to the broad and diverse expertise of PRC personnel and long-standing partnerships between PRCs and the communities in which they work.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Community Participation , Health Services Research/organization & administration , Preventive Health Services/organization & administration , Public Health , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Health Services Research/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Organizational Case Studies , Preventive Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
8.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 142(1): 75-84, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599886

ABSTRACT

The spread of COVID-19 has re-affirmed the crucial importance of the pharmaceuticals industry in improving the level of citizens' health and medical care, as well as the industry's importance in terms of contribution to economic growth and tax revenues. Although some time has passed since the importance of industry-academia collaboration was first raised in relation to the creation of innovative new drugs and the continuation of global competitiveness, conflicts between academia and companies have also been highlighted as barriers that hinder efforts to promote the practical realization of academia-initiated seeds. The authors have hypothesized that conflicts between academia and companies can be attributed to the vulnerability of innovation creation environments, including drug discovery, on the academia side, insufficient awareness concerning human resources that will undertake industry-academia operations, and inadequate development of structures. Consequently, we implemented fact-finding investigations in relation to universities and public research institutions in Japan, with the objective of ascertaining the actual status of innovation creation environments, including drug discovery, on the academia side. From the results of these investigations, we will clarify the issues that may present barriers to innovation creation, and consider policies, etc. for the enhancement of innovation creation environments.


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes , COVID-19 , Drug Discovery , Drug Industry , Intellectual Property , Intersectoral Collaboration , Humans , Universities , Workforce
9.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260122, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546946

ABSTRACT

With the incidence of Lyme and other tickborne diseases on the rise in the US and globally, there is a critical need for data-driven tools that communicate the magnitude of this problem and help guide public health responses. We present the Johns Hopkins Lyme and Tickborne Disease Dashboard (https://www.hopkinslymetracker.org/), a new tool that harnesses the power of geography to raise awareness and fuel research and scientific collaboration. The dashboard is unique in applying a geographic lens to tickborne diseases, aiming not only to become a global tracker of tickborne diseases but also to contextualize their complicated geography with a comprehensive set of maps and spatial data sets representing a One Health approach. We share our experience designing and implementing the dashboard, describe the main features, and discuss current limitations and future directions.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/methods , Lyme Disease/epidemiology , Software , Awareness , Geography, Medical , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Lyme Disease/prevention & control
13.
Hong Kong Med J ; 26(3): 171-173, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468758
14.
FASEB J ; 35(11): e21973, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462504

ABSTRACT

Contemporary science has become increasingly multi-disciplinary and team-based, resulting in unprecedented growth in biomedical innovation and technology over the last several decades. Collaborative research efforts have enabled investigators to respond to the demands of an increasingly complex 21st century landscape, including pressing scientific challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic. A major contributing factor to the success of team science is the mobilization of core facilities and shared research resources (SRRs), the scientific instrumentation and expertise that exist within research organizations that enable widespread access to advanced technologies for trainees, faculty, and staff. For over 40 years, SRRs have played a key role in accelerating biomedical research discoveries, yet a national strategy that addresses how to leverage these resources to enhance team science and achieve shared scientific goals is noticeably absent. We believe a national strategy for biomedical SRRs-led by the National Institutes of Health-is crucial to advance key national initiatives, enable long-term research efficiency, and provide a solid foundation for the next generation of scientists.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Intersectoral Collaboration , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Academies and Institutes/organization & administration , Career Mobility , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Policy , Program Evaluation , Research Support as Topic , Societies, Scientific/organization & administration , Stakeholder Participation , United States , Universities/organization & administration
15.
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am ; 30(4): 809-826, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415269

ABSTRACT

Psychiatry and psychology have a long history of competition that too often interferes with the collaboration that can characterize complementary contributions to our common missions. We hope this article will inspire our disciplines to expand on this collaboration, for the sake of our children and families, our communities, our colleagues, and honestly, ourselves. We are better together than apart. This text is a blueprint for the assumptions, attitudes, skills, and advocacy that can make this partnership healthy and successful.


Subject(s)
Child Psychiatry/methods , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Primary Health Care , Psychology, Child/methods , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Intersectoral Collaboration , Mental Health , Models, Organizational , Primary Health Care/ethics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration
20.
Curr Opin Virol ; 50: 103-109, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370468

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted a need for improved frameworks for drug discovery, repurposing, clinical trial design and therapy optimization and personalization. Mechanistic computational models can play an important role in developing these frameworks. We discuss how mechanistic models, which consider viral entry, replication in target cells, viral spread in the body, immune response, and the complex factors involved in tissue and organ damage and recovery, can clarify the mechanisms of humoral and cellular immune responses to the virus, viral distribution and replication in tissues, the origins of pathogenesis and patient-to-patient heterogeneity in responses. These models are already improving our understanding of the mechanisms of action of antivirals and immune modulators. We discuss how closer collaboration between the experimentalists, clinicians and modelers could result in more predictive models which may guide therapies for viral infections, improving survival and leading to faster and more complete recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Computer Simulation , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Hydrodynamics , Intersectoral Collaboration
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