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3.
Hong Kong Med J ; 26(3): 171-173, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468758
4.
FASEB J ; 35(11): e21973, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462504

ABSTRACT

Contemporary science has become increasingly multi-disciplinary and team-based, resulting in unprecedented growth in biomedical innovation and technology over the last several decades. Collaborative research efforts have enabled investigators to respond to the demands of an increasingly complex 21st century landscape, including pressing scientific challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic. A major contributing factor to the success of team science is the mobilization of core facilities and shared research resources (SRRs), the scientific instrumentation and expertise that exist within research organizations that enable widespread access to advanced technologies for trainees, faculty, and staff. For over 40 years, SRRs have played a key role in accelerating biomedical research discoveries, yet a national strategy that addresses how to leverage these resources to enhance team science and achieve shared scientific goals is noticeably absent. We believe a national strategy for biomedical SRRs-led by the National Institutes of Health-is crucial to advance key national initiatives, enable long-term research efficiency, and provide a solid foundation for the next generation of scientists.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Intersectoral Collaboration , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Academies and Institutes/organization & administration , Career Mobility , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Policy , Program Evaluation , Research Support as Topic , Societies, Scientific/organization & administration , Stakeholder Participation , United States , Universities/organization & administration
5.
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am ; 30(4): 809-826, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415269

ABSTRACT

Psychiatry and psychology have a long history of competition that too often interferes with the collaboration that can characterize complementary contributions to our common missions. We hope this article will inspire our disciplines to expand on this collaboration, for the sake of our children and families, our communities, our colleagues, and honestly, ourselves. We are better together than apart. This text is a blueprint for the assumptions, attitudes, skills, and advocacy that can make this partnership healthy and successful.


Subject(s)
Child Psychiatry/methods , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Primary Health Care , Psychology, Child/methods , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Intersectoral Collaboration , Mental Health , Models, Organizational , Primary Health Care/ethics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration
8.
Curr Opin Virol ; 50: 103-109, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370468

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted a need for improved frameworks for drug discovery, repurposing, clinical trial design and therapy optimization and personalization. Mechanistic computational models can play an important role in developing these frameworks. We discuss how mechanistic models, which consider viral entry, replication in target cells, viral spread in the body, immune response, and the complex factors involved in tissue and organ damage and recovery, can clarify the mechanisms of humoral and cellular immune responses to the virus, viral distribution and replication in tissues, the origins of pathogenesis and patient-to-patient heterogeneity in responses. These models are already improving our understanding of the mechanisms of action of antivirals and immune modulators. We discuss how closer collaboration between the experimentalists, clinicians and modelers could result in more predictive models which may guide therapies for viral infections, improving survival and leading to faster and more complete recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Computer Simulation , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Hydrodynamics , Intersectoral Collaboration
10.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3041-3044, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345436

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a seismic shift in my career, including its scientific focus, research approach, and efforts to communicate with non-scientists. In this NeuroView, I recount pivotal moments that have transformed the way I do science.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Intersectoral Collaboration , Biomedical Research/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Communication , Humans , Social Media/trends
14.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253978, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325434

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) has brought great disasters to humanity, and its influence continues to intensify. In response to the public health emergencies, prompt relief supplies are key to reduce the damage. This paper presents a method of emergency medical logistics to quick response to emergency epidemics. The methodology includes two recursive mechanisms: (1) the time-varying forecasting of medical relief demand according to a modified susceptible-exposed-infected- Asymptomatic- recovered (SEIAR) epidemic diffusion model, (2) the relief supplies distribution based on a multi-objective dynamic stochastic programming model. Specially, the distribution model addresses a hypothetical network of emergency medical logistics with considering emergency medical reserve centers (EMRCs), epidemic areas and e-commerce warehousing centers as the rescue points. Numerical studies are conducted. The results show that with the cooperation of different epidemic areas and e-commerce warehousing centers, the total cost is 6% lower than without considering cooperation of different epidemic areas, and 9.7% lower than without considering cooperation of e-commerce warehousing centers. Particularly, the total cost is 20% lower than without considering any cooperation. This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation in epidemic prevention, and provides the government with a new idea of emergency relief supplies dispatching, that the rescue efficiency can be improved by mutual rescue between epidemic areas in public health emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Public Health/methods , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Civil Defense/economics , Emergencies/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/economics , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Models, Statistical , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
15.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1560-1563, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310946

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: American Indians and Alaska Natives hold a state-conferred right to health, yet significant health and health care disparities persist. Academic medical centers are resource-rich institutions committed to public service, yet few are engaged in responsive, equitable, and lasting tribal health partnerships to address these challenges. APPROACH: Maniilaq Association, a rural and remote tribal health organization in Northwest Alaska, partnered with Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School to address health care needs through physician staffing, training, and quality improvement initiatives. This partnership, called Siamit, falls under tribal governance, focuses on supporting community health leaders, addresses challenges shaped by extreme geographic remoteness, and advances the mission of academic medicine in the context of tribal health priorities. OUTCOMES: Throughout the 2019-2020 academic year, Siamit augmented local physician staffing, mentored health professions trainees, provided continuing medical education courses, implemented quality improvement initiatives, and provided clinical care and operational support during the COVID-19 pandemic. Siamit began with a small budget and limited human resources, demonstrating that relatively small investments in academic-tribal health partnerships can support meaningful and positive outcomes. NEXT STEPS: During the 2020-2021 academic year, the authors plan to expand Siamit's efforts with a broader social medicine curriculum, additional attending staff, more frequent trainee rotations, an increasingly robust mentorship network for Indigenous health professions trainees, and further study of the impact of these efforts. Such partnerships may be replicable in other settings and represent a significant opportunity to advance community health priorities, strengthen tribal health systems, support the next generation of Indigenous health leaders, and carry out the academic medicine mission of teaching, research, and service.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Intersectoral Collaboration , Alaska/epidemiology , Alaskan Natives/ethnology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Curriculum , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Indians, North American/ethnology , Public Health/trends , Quality Improvement/standards , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Workforce
16.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 57, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305870

ABSTRACT

Globally, 10-20% of children and adolescents experience mental health conditions, but most of them do not receive the appropriate care when it is needed. The COVID-19 deaths and prevention measures, such as the lockdowns, economic downturns, and school closures, have affected many communities physically, mentally, and economically and significantly impacted the already-neglected children and adolescents' mental health. As a result, evidence has shown that many children and adolescents are experiencing psychological effects such as depression and anxiety without adequate support. The consequences of not addressing the mental health conditions in children and adolescents extend through adulthood and restrict them from reaching their full potential. The effects of COVID-19 on children and adolescents' mental health highlight the urgent need for multisectoral home-grown solutions to provide early diagnosis and treatment and educate caregivers on home-based interventions and community outreach initiatives to address children and adolescents' mental health challenges during this pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Mental Health Services , Early Medical Intervention/organization & administration , Mental Disorders , Quarantine/psychology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Community Mental Health Services/methods , Community Mental Health Services/trends , Education, Distance , Global Health , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health/trends , Psychosocial Deprivation , Rwanda/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Pediatrics ; 148(4)2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302048

ABSTRACT

The St Louis Regional Pediatric Learning Collaborative of pediatric primary care providers and infectious diseases specialists formed in March 2020 to address the needs of children and families during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. More than 400 pediatric primary care providers participated, using a listserv to discuss care and organize webinars to provide updates on local and national data and plan next steps. To inform local decision-making about care and testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, 95 providers from 26 practices partnered with the local practice-based research network to rapidly collect and share data about children with COVID-19-like symptoms. Of 2162 children tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, 9% had positive test results. Test result positivity was 33% if a patient was exposed to a confirmed case of COVID-19 and 4% if they had COVID-19-like symptoms and no exposure. School or day care attendance was associated with lower rates of positive test results. Although not originally planned, these findings drove local advocacy efforts by the Collaborative for increased access to testing and contact tracing and safe in-person school. Members communicated directly and collectively with local politicians, provided advice and resources for school boards and superintendent groups, and appeared on various media platforms. In these efforts, they shared local data, highlighting the lower rate of positive test results for children in school to support the idea that schools could be safely open. Outreach from trusted pediatricians sharing prospective, timely, local data sustained in-person school for some districts and aided in future in-person openings for other school districts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Intersectoral Collaboration , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child Care , Clinical Protocols , Contact Tracing , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Social Media
18.
Anticancer Res ; 41(7): 3561-3565, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299778

ABSTRACT

AIM: Radiation therapy is a cornerstone of oncological treatment and oncological patients show greater risk of developing complications related to COVID-19 infection. Stringent social restrictions have ensured a significant reduction in the spread of the virus, but also gave rise to a number of critical issues for radiation oncology wards. For this reason, the Directors of the Radiation Oncology Departments (RODs) of Lazio, Abruzzo and Molise regions shared their experience and ideas in order to create a common document that may assist in facing the negative impacts of the pandemic on radiation oncology wards and patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was conducted according to the Estimate-Talk-Estimate method. Five issues were proposed and rated. Among approved issues, statements were proposed anonymously, then harmonized and finally voted on according to a Likert scale from 1 to 9. Those for which an agreement of 7-9 was observed were finally approved. RESULTS: The document was developed with 42 statements dealing about safety measures for patients and staff, organization of clinical and work activities, usage of Information Technology systems for meetings/smart working. An agreement was recorded for 34 statements. CONCLUSION: This document sets out some recommendations for RODs and can provide valuable management information for Oncological Radiotherapy wards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Radiation Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
19.
Public Health Rep ; 136(4): 403-412, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295312

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Data-informed decision making is valued among school districts, but challenges remain for local health departments to provide data, especially during a pandemic. We describe the rapid planning and deployment of a school-based COVID-19 surveillance system in a metropolitan US county. METHODS: In 2020, we used several data sources to construct disease- and school-based indicators for COVID-19 surveillance in Franklin County, an urban county in central Ohio. We collected, processed, analyzed, and visualized data in the COVID-19 Analytics and Targeted Surveillance System for Schools (CATS). CATS included web-based applications (public and secure versions), automated alerts, and weekly reports for the general public and decision makers, including school administrators, school boards, and local health departments. RESULTS: We deployed a pilot version of CATS in less than 2 months (August-September 2020) and added 21 school districts in central Ohio (15 in Franklin County and 6 outside the county) into CATS during the subsequent months. Public-facing web-based applications provided parents and students with local information for data-informed decision making. We created an algorithm to enable local health departments to precisely identify school districts and school buildings at high risk of an outbreak and active SARS-CoV-2 transmission in school settings. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Piloting a surveillance system with diverse school districts helps scale up to other districts. Leveraging past relationships and identifying emerging partner needs were critical to rapid and sustainable collaboration. Valuing diverse skill sets is key to rapid deployment of proactive and innovative public health practices during a global pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Intersectoral Collaboration , Public Health Surveillance , Schools/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Data Collection , Humans , Ohio/epidemiology , Pilot Projects , Socioeconomic Factors
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