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1.
BMC Cancer ; 22(1): 141, 2022 Feb 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2162322

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the combination of systemic and targeted chemotherapies is associated with severe adverse side effects and long-term health complications, there is interest in reducing treatment intensity for patients with early-stage breast cancer (EBC). Clinical trials are needed to determine the feasibility of reducing treatment intensity while maintaining 3-year recurrence-free survival of greater than 92%. To recruit participants for these trials, it is important to understand patient perspectives on reducing chemotherapy. METHODS: We collected qualitative interview data from twenty-four patients with Stage II-III breast cancer and sixteen patient advocates. Interviews explored potential barriers and facilitators to participation in trials testing reduced amounts of chemotherapy. As the COVID-19 pandemic struck during data collection, seventeen participants were asked about the potential impact of COVID-19 on their interest in these trials. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed, and researchers used qualitative content analysis to code for dominant themes. RESULTS: Seventeen participants (42.5%) expressed interest in participating in a trial of reduced chemotherapy. Barriers to reducing chemotherapy included (1) fear of recurrence and inefficacy, (2) preference for aggressive treatment, (3) disinterest in clinical trials, (4) lack of information about expected outcomes, (5) fear of regret, and (6) having young children. Facilitators included (1) avoiding physical toxicity, (2) understanding the scientific rationale of reducing chemotherapy, (3) confidence in providers, (4) consistent monitoring and the option to increase dosage, (5) fewer financial and logistical challenges, and (6) contributing to scientific knowledge. Of those asked, nearly all participants said they would be more motivated to reduce treatment intensity in the context of COVID-19, primarily to avoid exposure to the virus while receiving treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Among individuals with EBC, there is significant interest in alleviating treatment-related toxicity by reducing chemotherapeutic intensity. Patients will be more apt to participate in trials testing reduced amounts of chemotherapy if these are framed in terms of customizing treatment to the individual patient and added benefit-reduced toxicities, higher quality of life during treatment and lower risk of long-term complications-rather than in terms of taking treatments away or doing less than the standard of care. Doctor-patient rapport and provider support will be crucial in this process.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Patient Advocacy/psychology , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Decision Making , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Middle Aged , Motivation , Qualitative Research , Quality of Life
2.
Urology ; 143: 55-61, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096092

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate urology applicants' opinions about the interview process during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An anonymous survey was emailed to applicants to our institution from the 2019 and 2020 urology matches prior to issuance of professional organization guidelines. The survey inquired about attitudes toward the residency interview process in the era of COVID-19 and which interview elements could be replicated virtually. Descriptive statistics were utilized. RESULTS: Eighty percent of urology applicants from the 2019 and 2020 matches received our survey. One hundred fifty-six people (24% of recipients) responded. Thirty-four percent preferred virtual interviews, while 41% in-person interviews at each program, and 25% regional/centralized interviews. Sixty-four percent said that interactions with residents (pre/postinterview social and informal time) were the most important interview day component and 81% said it could not be replicated virtually. Conversely, 81% believed faculty interviews could be replicated virtually. Eighty-seven percent believed that city visits could not be accomplished virtually. A plurality felt that away rotations and second-looks should be allowed (both 45%). COMMENT: Applicants feel that faculty interviews can be replicated virtually, while resident interactions cannot. Steps such as a low-stakes second looks after programs submit rank lists (potentially extending this window) and small virtual encounters with residents could ease applicant concerns. CONCLUSION: Applicants have concerns about changes to the match processes. Programs can adopt virtual best practices to address these issues.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urology/education , Adult , COVID-19 , Career Choice , Communication , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , School Admission Criteria , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 670, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus currently cause a lot of pressure on the health system. Accordingly, many changes occurred in the way of providing health care, including pregnancy and childbirth care. To our knowledge, no studies on experiences of maternity care Providers during the COVID-19 Pandemic have been published in Iran. We aimed to discover their experiences on pregnancy and childbirth care during the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This study was a qualitative research performed with a descriptive phenomenological approach. The used sampling method was purposive sampling by taking the maximum variation possible into account, which continued until data saturation. Accordingly, in-depth and semi-structured interviews were conducted by including 12 participants, as 4 gynecologists, 6 midwives working in the hospitals and private offices, and 2 midwives working in the health centers. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi's seven stage method with MAXQDA10 software. RESULTS: Data analysis led to the extraction of 3 themes, 9 categories, and 25 subcategories. The themes were as follows: "Fear of Disease", "Burnout", and "Lessons Learned from the COVID-19 Pandemic", respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal health care providers experience emotional and psychological stress and work challenges during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, comprehensive support should be provided for the protection of their physical and mental health statuses. By working as a team, utilizing the capacity of telemedicine to care and follow up mothers, and providing maternity care at home, some emerged challenges to maternal care services can be overcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Emotions/physiology , Female , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Interviews as Topic , Iran/epidemiology , Maternal Health Services/trends , Middle Aged , Midwifery/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care/organization & administration , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Telemedicine/methods
4.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 625, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923520

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has placed additional stressors on mothers during an already vulnerable lifecourse transition. Initial social distancing restrictions (Timepoint 1; T1) and initial changes to those social distancing restrictions (Timepoint 2; T2) have disrupted postpartum access to practical and emotional support. This qualitative study explores the postpartum psychological experiences of UK women during different phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated 'lockdowns'. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 women, approximately 30 days after initial social distancing guidelines were imposed in the UK (22 April 2020). A separate 12 women were interviewed approximately 30 days after the initial easing of social distancing restrictions (10 June 2020). Data were transcribed verbatim, uploaded into NVivo for management and analysis, which followed a recurrent cross-sectional approach to thematic analysis. RESULTS: Two main themes were identified for T1: 'Motherhood is Much Like Lockdown' and 'A Self-Contained Family Unit'. Each main T1 theme contained two sub-themes. Two main themes were also identified for T2: 'Incongruously Held Views of COVID-19' and 'Mothering Amidst the Pandemic'. Each main T2 theme contained three sub-themes. Comparisons between data gathered at each timepoint identified increased emotional distress over time. Current findings call for the improvement of postpartum care by improving accessibility to social support, and prioritising the re-opening of schools, and face-to-face healthcare appointments and visitation. CONCLUSION: Social distancing restrictions associated with COVID-19 have had a cumulative, negative effect on postpartum mental health. Recommendations such as: Allowing mothers to 'bubble' with a primary support provider even at their healthcare appointments; allowing one support partner to attend all necessary healthcare appointments; and providing tailored informational resources, may help to support postpartum emotional wellbeing during this, and similar health crises in the future.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Psychological Distress , Social Support , Adult , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Mental Health Services , Postnatal Care/methods , Postpartum Period/psychology , Qualitative Research
5.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264311, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1896449

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2pandemic necessitated several changes in maternity care. We investigated maternity care providers' opinions on the positive and negative effects of these changes and on potential areas of improvement for future maternity care both in times of crisis and in regular maternity care. METHODS: We conducted nineteen semi-structured in-depth interviews with obstetricians, obstetric residents, community-based and hospital-based midwives and obstetric nurses. The interviews were thematically analysed using inductive Thematic analysis. RESULTS: Five themes were generated: '(Dis)proportionate measures', 'A significant impact of COVID-19', 'Differing views on inter-provider cooperation', 'Reluctance to seek help' and 'Lessons learnt'. The Central Organizing Concept was: 'It was tough but necessary'. The majority of participants were positive about most of the measures that were taken and about their proportionality. These measures had a significant impact on maternity care providers, both mentally and on an organizational level. Most hospital-based care providers were positive about professional cooperation and communication, but some community-based midwives indicated that the cooperation between different midwifery care practices was suboptimal. Negative effects mentioned were a higher threshold for women to seek care, less partner involvement and perceived more fear among women and their partners, especially around birth. The most significant positive effect mentioned was increased use of eHealth tools. Recommendations for future care were to consider the necessity of prenatal and postnatal care more critically, to replace some face-to-face visits with eHealth and to provide more individualised care. CONCLUSION: Maternity care providers experienced measures and organizational changes during the first wave of the COVID19-pandemic as tough, but necessary. They believed that a more critical consideration of medically necessary care, increased use of e-health and more individualised care might contribute to making maternity care more sustainable during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Maternal Health Services/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Netherlands/epidemiology , Nurses/psychology , Organizational Innovation , Physicians/psychology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264145, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1896446

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccine uptake rates have been historically low in correctional settings. To better understand vaccine hesitancy in these high-risk settings, we explored reasons for COVID-19 vaccine refusal among people in federal prisons. METHODS: Three maximum security all-male federal prisons in British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario (Canada) were chosen, representing prisons with the highest proportions of COVID-19 vaccine refusal. Using a qualitative descriptive design and purposive sampling, individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with incarcerated people who had previously refused at least one COVID-19 vaccine until data saturation was achieved. An inductive-deductive thematic analysis of audio-recorded interview transcripts was conducted using the Conceptual Model of Vaccine Hesitancy. RESULTS: Between May 19-July 8, 2021, 14 participants were interviewed (median age: 30 years; n = 7 Indigenous, n = 4 visible minority, n = 3 White). Individual-, interpersonal-, and system-level factors were identified. Three were particularly relevant to the correctional setting: 1) Risk perception: participants perceived that they were at lower risk of COVID-19 due to restricted visits and interactions; 2) Health care services in prison: participants reported feeling "punished" and stigmatized due to strict COVID-19 restrictions, and failed to identify personal benefits of vaccination due to the lack of incentives; 3) Universal distrust: participants expressed distrust in prison employees, including health care providers. INTERPRETATION: Reasons for vaccine refusal among people in prison are multifaceted. Educational interventions could seek to address COVID-19 risk misconceptions in prison settings. However, impact may be limited if trust is not fostered and if incentives are not considered in vaccine promotion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Prisoners/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Alberta , Attitude , British Columbia , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Norms , Social Responsibility , Young Adult
7.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 87(4): 1016-1023, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Socioeconomic disadvantages and potential immunocompromise raise particular concerns for people living with HIV (PLWH) and other marginalized communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we explored COVID-19 testing and the impact of the pandemic among participants from the Miami Adult Studies on HIV cohort, predominantly composed of low-income minorities living with and without HIV. METHODS: Between July and August 2020, a telephone survey was administered to 299 Miami Adult Studies on HIV participants to assess COVID-19 testing, prevention behaviors, and psychosocial stressors. Health care utilization, antiretroviral adherence, food insecurity, and substance use during the pandemic were compared with those of their last cohort visit (7.8 ± 2.9 months earlier). RESULTS: Half of surveyed participants had been tested for COVID-19, 8 had tested positive and 2 had been hospitalized. PLWH (n = 183) were 42% times less likely than HIV-uninfected participants to have been tested. However, after adjustment for age, employment, COVID-19 symptoms, mental health care, and substance use, the effect of HIV status was no longer significant. PLWH were more likely to have seen a health care provider, use face coverings, and avoid public transportation and less likely to be food insecure and drink hazardously. There were significant changes in substance use patterns during the pandemic when compared with those before. CONCLUSION: PLWH, compared with their HIV-uninfected peers, were more likely to engage in preventive measures and health care during the pandemic, potentially reducing their exposure to COVID-19. There were no reported changes in antiretroviral adherence or health care utilization, but there were changes in substance use; these need to be monitored as this crisis progresses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/complications , HIV Infections/complications , Cohort Studies , Female , Florida , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Poverty , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy , Vulnerable Populations
8.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258484, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770697

ABSTRACT

Public perceptions of pandemic viral threats and government policies can influence adherence to containment, delay, and mitigation policies such as physical distancing, hygienic practices, use of physical barriers, uptake of testing, contact tracing, and vaccination programs. The UK COVID-19 Public Experiences (COPE) study aims to identify determinants of health behaviour using the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation (COM-B) model using a longitudinal mixed-methods approach. Here, we provide a detailed description of the demographic and self-reported health characteristics of the COPE cohort at baseline assessment, an overview of data collected, and plans for follow-up of the cohort. The COPE baseline survey was completed by 11,113 UK adult residents (18+ years of age). Baseline data collection started on the 13th of March 2020 (10-days before the introduction of the first national COVID-19 lockdown in the UK) and finished on the 13th of April 2020. Participants were recruited via the HealthWise Wales (HWW) research registry and through social media snowballing and advertising (Facebook®, Twitter®, Instagram®). Participants were predominantly female (69%), over 50 years of age (68%), identified as white (98%), and were living with their partner (68%). A large proportion (67%) had a college/university level education, and half reported a pre-existing health condition (50%). Initial follow-up plans for the cohort included in-depth surveys at 3-months and 12-months after the first UK national lockdown to assess short and medium-term effects of the pandemic on health behaviour and subjective health and well-being. Additional consent will be sought from participants at follow-up for data linkage and surveys at 18 and 24-months after the initial UK national lockdown. A large non-random sample was recruited to the COPE cohort during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, which will enable longitudinal analysis of the determinants of health behaviour and changes in subjective health and well-being over the course of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
9.
Am J Public Health ; 111(12): 2167-2175, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760043

ABSTRACT

High-quality data are accurate, relevant, and timely. Large national health surveys have always balanced the implementation of these quality dimensions to meet the needs of diverse users. The COVID-19 pandemic shifted these balances, with both disrupted survey operations and a critical need for relevant and timely health data for decision-making. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) responded to these challenges with several operational changes to continue production in 2020. However, data files from the 2020 NHIS were not expected to be publicly available until fall 2021. To fill the gap, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) turned to 2 online data collection platforms-the Census Bureau's Household Pulse Survey (HPS) and the NCHS Research and Development Survey (RANDS)-to collect COVID-19‒related data more quickly. This article describes the adaptations of NHIS and the use of HPS and RANDS during the pandemic in the context of the recently released Framework for Data Quality from the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(12):2167-2175. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306516).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Surveys/methods , Internet , National Center for Health Statistics, U.S./organization & administration , Bias , Cross-Sectional Studies , Data Collection/methods , Data Collection/standards , Health Surveys/standards , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone , United States/epidemiology
10.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265807, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759962

ABSTRACT

Lifestyle physical activity following spinal cord injury (SCI) is critical for functional independence, mental wellness, and social participation, yet nearly 50% of individuals with SCI report no regular exercise. The objective of this study was to better understand factors leading to this participation gap by capturing the physical activity perspectives of individuals living with SCI. We completed small group interviews with nine individuals living with SCI across the United States. Iterative thematic analysis systematically revealed meaningful core concepts related to physical activity engagement with SCI. Emergent themes revealed challenges to lifestyle physical activity behavior including gaps in physical activity education, isolation during psychological adjustment, and knowledge limitations in community exercise settings. A secondary theme related to the COVID-19 pandemic emerged, highlighting additional environmental constraints affecting participation. Our findings suggest that most physical activity education is delivered during inpatient rehabilitation and is related to physical function. Lifetime physical activity strategies are achieved through self-education and peer networking. Personal motivators for physical activity include secondary condition prevention, while social and emotional barriers prevent regular adherence. These findings can inform the development and delivery of physical activity programs to maximize physical activity engagement in individuals living with chronic SCI.


Subject(s)
Spinal Cord Injuries/rehabilitation , Adult , Aged , Attitude to Health , Emotional Adjustment , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Spinal Cord Injuries/psychology , Spinal Cord Injuries/therapy
11.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264617, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753190

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 has had a global effect on people's lifestyles. Many people have developed irregular eating patterns and become physically inactive, which leads to an aggravation of lifestyle-related diseases and unhealthier lifestyles; these, subsequently raise the severity of coronavirus disease 2019. This study aimed to assess lifestyle changes during coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic in Gondar town, North West, Ethiopia. METHOD: Community-based cross-sectional study design was conducted among households at Gondar town from June to August 2021. The study participants were selected by a systematic random sampling technique from proportionally allocated kebeles. Data were collected using face-to-face interview techniques and were entered and analyzed by using a statistical package for the social sciences version 24; P-values < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. RESULT: Overall, 348 study participants were included in the study. Among those respondents, 52.3% (182) were female study participants and the mean age of the respondents was 30.95±14.4. In this study, there was a significant decrement in non-homemade food from 20.4% to 13.4% at (P = <0.001). Concerning water intake, 11.5% (40) of respondents consumed ≥8 cups/day before the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, and the percentage increased to 14.7% (51) during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (p = 0.01). Of the participants, 46% participants were reported never engaging in any physical activity before the coronavirus pandemic, and the percentage decreased to 29.9% during the pandemic (P = 0.002). The respondents also exhibited increment tension in large from 4.9% to 22.7% before and during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, respectively. Furthermore, about 6.3% of the study participants slept badly before the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemics and the effects of sleeping badly and restlessly increased to 25.9% during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (P = <0.001). CONCLUSION: The current study demonstrates that there is a noticeable alteration in food consumption, food choices, regular mealtime, sleeping habits, mental exhaustion, and practice of physical activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0259954, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753180

ABSTRACT

The advent of coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19, continues to trigger several important disruptions/innovations in practically every sector around the world. Additionally, the impacts are predominant in certain educational systems and in creating opportunities. Previous studies had addressed possible effective methods in handling distant learning and student interactions. This qualitative study explored lecturers' information literacy experience during online classes as a result of the pandemic. Semi-structured interview techniques were applied among participants, made up of 15 lecturers in the Humanities Faculty, Diponegoro University, Indonesia, and thematic analysis was used to analyze the data obtained. The results showed the focus of lecturers' information literacy experience was primarily on student interactions and knowledge of various online learning platforms. However, information repackaging was a significant initial consideration during virtual classes, after identifying salient student characteristics. In summary, the present study have contributed to the theoretical understanding of information literacy and may be of benefit to the teaching faculties for enhancing teaching and learning activities, as well as providing student support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Humanities/education , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Adult , Female , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Information Literacy , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research
14.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 68, 2022 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745420

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is no valid and reliable tool to measure COVID-19 healthcare stress felt by healthcare students. A scale was developed to assess COVID-19 stress in healthcare students and its psychometrics was examined. METHODS: This is a two phases mixed-method study including a qualitative stage consisting of student interview and literature review to develop content of the tool. In the quantitative stage, the psychometrics of the scale was examined in 2020-2021. RESULTS: The COVID-19 related healthcare student stress scale (CHSSS) featured five factors including fear of catching coronavirus, social constraints, changes in education, non-compliance of health protocols and worrying news and overload information, which totally explained 51.75% of the total variance. CONCLUSION: Validity and reliability of CHSSS with 17 items were supported to measure COVID-19 stress in healthcare students as a self-assessment tool. Researchers can utilize this tool to assess COVID-19 stress in healthcare students and introduce policies and intervention especially designed for healthcare students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Psychometrics , Qualitative Research , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264956, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736515

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has inundated the entire world disrupting the lives of millions of people. The pandemic has stressed the healthcare system of India impacting the psychological status and functioning of health care workers. The aim of this study is to determine the burnout levels and factors associated with the risk of psychological distress among healthcare workers (HCW) engaged in the management of COVID 19 in India. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 September 2020 to 30 November 2020 by telephonic interviews using a web-based Google form. Health facilities and community centres from 12 cities located in 10 states were selected for data collection. Data on socio-demographic and occupation-related variables like age, sex, type of family, income, type of occupation, hours of work and income were obtained was obtained from 967 participants, including doctors, nurses, ambulance drivers, emergency response teams, lab personnel, and others directly involved in COVID 19 patient care. Levels of psychological distress was assessed by the General health Questionnaire -GHQ-5 and levels of burnout was assessed using the ICMR-NIOH Burnout questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with the risk of psychological distress. The third quartile values of the three subscales of burnout viz EE, DP and PA were used to identify burnout profiles of the healthcare workers. RESULTS: Overall, 52.9% of the participants had the risk of psychological distress that needed further evaluation. Risk of psychological distress was significantly associated with longer hours of work (≥ 8 hours a day) (AOR = 2.38, 95% CI(1.66-3.41), income≥20000(AOR = 1.74, 95% CI, (1.16-2.6); screening of COVID-19 patients (AOR = 1.63 95% CI (1.09-2.46), contact tracing (AOR = 2.05, 95% CI (1.1-3.81), High Emotional exhaustion score (EE ≥16) (AOR = 4.41 95% CI (3.14-6.28) and High Depersonalisation score (DP≥7) (AOR = 1.79, 95% CI (1.28-2.51)). About 4.7% of the HCWs were overextended (EE>18); 6.5% were disengaged (DP>8) and 9.7% HCWs were showing signs of burnout (high on all three dimensions). CONCLUSION: The study has identified key factors that could have been likely triggers for psychological distress among healthcare workers who were engaged in management of COVID cases in India. The study also demonstrates the use of GHQ-5 and ICMR-NIOH Burnout questionnaire as important tools to identify persons at risk of psychological distress and occurrence of burnout symptoms respectively. The findings provide useful guide to planning interventions to mitigate mental health problems among HCW in future epidemic/pandemic scenarios in the country.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Adult , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Interviews as Topic , Male , Mental Health/trends , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Front Public Health ; 9: 780139, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731857

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A large number of nurses across China joined the anti-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) front-line in Hubei province, where the local healthcare system faced unprecedented challenges in the early 2020. Few studies have reported the psychological experiences of nurses from other regions who voluntarily participated in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Hubei province. AIM: To describe the psychological experiences of nurses who were involved in the anti-COVID-19 pandemic battle in Hubei province from January to April 2020. METHODS: This was a qualitative descriptive study using purposive and snowball sampling strategies for participant recruitment. Twenty-four nurses were approached and twenty-one of them completed telephone interviews in April 2020. The interviews took an average of 75 min (range 34-140 min). Data were analyzed thematically after verbatim transcription of the interviews. RESULTS: Our analysis generated three primary themes: (I) Contexts; (II) Psychological responses; and (III) Coping strategies (most participants identified suitable coping strategies including relaxing activities and seeking social support). Participants' psychological responses varied in four phases of the journey through the experience: (i) initiation phase: obligations and concerns/fears; (ii) transition phase: from overwhelmed to increased confidence; (iii) adaptation phase: a sense of achievement and exhaustion; and (iv) completion phase: professional and personal growth. CONCLUSION: Nurses had concerns, fears, and faced challenges working on the COVID-19 front-line. However, they were motivated by a strong sense of professional commitment. Most nurses successfully achieved personal and professional growth as they identified a range of coping strategies. Future research is needed to explore the long-term impact of the COVID-19 related working experiences on these nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Motivation , Pandemics , Professionalism , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Volunteers/psychology
17.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265092, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731606

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Community Health Workers are globally recognised as crucial members of healthcare systems in low and middle-income countries, but their role and experience during COVID-19 is not well-understood. This study aimed to explore factors that influence CHWs' ability and willingness to work in the COVID-19 pandemic in Lagos. DESIGN: A generic qualitative study exploring Community Health Workers experiences and perceptions of working during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lagos, Nigeria. METHODS: 15 semi-structured, in-depth, video interviews were conducted with Community Health Workers purposively sampled across seven of Lagos' Local Government Areas with the highest COVID-19 burden. Interviews explored Community Health Workers' attitudes towards COVID-19, its management, and their experiences working in Lagos. Data was analysed thematically using the framework method. RESULTS: Three main themes were identified. 1. Influences on ability to undertake COVID-19 Role: Trust and COVID-19 knowledge were found to aid Community Health Workers in their work. However, challenges included exhaustion due to an increased workload, public misconceptions about COVID-19, stigmatisation of COVID-19 patients, delayed access to care and lack of transportation. 2. Influences on willingness to work in COVID-19 Role: Community Health Workers' perceptions of COVID-19, attitudes towards responsibility for COVID-19 risk at work, commitment and faith appeared to increase willingness to work. 3. Suggested Improvements: Financial incentives, provision of adequate personal protective equipment, transportation, and increasing staff numbers were seen as potential strategies to address many of the challenges faced. CONCLUSION: Despite Community Health Workers being committed to their role, they have faced many challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic in Nigeria. Changes to their working environment may make their role during disease outbreaks more fulfilling and sustainable. International input is required to enhance Nigeria's policies and infrastructure to better support Community Health Workers during both current and future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Health Workers/psychology , Adult , Attitude , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Knowledge , Male , Middle Aged , Nigeria/epidemiology , Pandemics , Perception , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stereotyping , Surveys and Questionnaires , Transportation , Workload , Young Adult
18.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722823

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Nurses working during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have reported elevated levels of anxiety, burnout and sleep disruption. Hospital administrators are in a unique position to mitigate or exacerbate stressful working conditions. The goal of this study was to capture the recommendations of nurses providing frontline care during the pandemic. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Semi-structured interviews were conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, with 36 nurses living in Canada and working in Canada or the United States. FINDINGS: The following recommendations were identified from reflexive thematic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) The nurses emphasized the need for a leadership style that embodied visibility, availability and careful planning. (2) Information overload contributed to stress, and participants appealed for clear, consistent and transparent communication. (3) A more resilient healthcare supply chain was required to safeguard the distribution of equipment, supplies and medications. (4) Clear communication of policies related to sick leave, pay equity and workload was necessary. (5) Equity should be considered, particularly with regard to redeployment. (6) Nurses wanted psychological support offered by trusted providers, managers and peers. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Over-reliance on employee assistance programmes and other individualized approaches to virtual care were not well-received. An integrative systems-based approach is needed to address the multifaceted mental health outcomes and reduce the deleterious impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the nursing workforce. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Results of this study capture the recommendations made by nurses during in-depth interviews conducted early in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Health Services , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Canada , Communication , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Leadership , Male , Needs Assessment , Organizational Policy , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sick Leave , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , United States , Workload
20.
Clin Exp Dermatol ; 47(3): 600-602, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706275

ABSTRACT

We performed a cost estimation of dermatology residency applications prior to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions (2016-2020) and during the COVID-19 pandemic (2021) and surveyed dermatology programme directors to assess the impact of virtual interviews. We found that COVID-19 virtual interviews significantly reduced the cost of applications. We understand that the changes forced by the pandemic were challenging and not ideal; however, the online aspect of interviews provided a way for applicants to save a significant amount of money.


Subject(s)
Dermatology , Internship and Residency/economics , Interviews as Topic , Job Application , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , United States
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