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1.
Nature ; 603(7902): 706-714, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764186

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron BA.1 variant emerged in 20211 and has multiple mutations in its spike protein2. Here we show that the spike protein of Omicron has a higher affinity for ACE2 compared with Delta, and a marked change in its antigenicity increases Omicron's evasion of therapeutic monoclonal and vaccine-elicited polyclonal neutralizing antibodies after two doses. mRNA vaccination as a third vaccine dose rescues and broadens neutralization. Importantly, the antiviral drugs remdesivir and molnupiravir retain efficacy against Omicron BA.1. Replication was similar for Omicron and Delta virus isolates in human nasal epithelial cultures. However, in lung cells and gut cells, Omicron demonstrated lower replication. Omicron spike protein was less efficiently cleaved compared with Delta. The differences in replication were mapped to the entry efficiency of the virus on the basis of spike-pseudotyped virus assays. The defect in entry of Omicron pseudotyped virus to specific cell types effectively correlated with higher cellular RNA expression of TMPRSS2, and deletion of TMPRSS2 affected Delta entry to a greater extent than Omicron. Furthermore, drug inhibitors targeting specific entry pathways3 demonstrated that the Omicron spike inefficiently uses the cellular protease TMPRSS2, which promotes cell entry through plasma membrane fusion, with greater dependency on cell entry through the endocytic pathway. Consistent with suboptimal S1/S2 cleavage and inability to use TMPRSS2, syncytium formation by the Omicron spike was substantially impaired compared with the Delta spike. The less efficient spike cleavage of Omicron at S1/S2 is associated with a shift in cellular tropism away from TMPRSS2-expressing cells, with implications for altered pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Membrane Fusion , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cell Line , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cell Membrane/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Convalescence , Female , Humans , Immune Sera/immunology , Intestines/pathology , Intestines/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation , Nasal Mucosa/pathology , Nasal Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Tissue Culture Techniques , Virulence , Virus Replication
2.
J Pediatr ; 243: 214-218.e5, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757591

ABSTRACT

A previously healthy 12-year-old boy had severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) that was rapidly fatal. Autopsy revealed the presence of a large intracardiac thrombus. SARS-CoV-2 spike protein was detected in intestinal cells, supporting the hypothesis that viral presence in the gut may be related to the immunologic response of MIS-C.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intestines , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Intestines/virology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
3.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555020

ABSTRACT

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a novel coronavirus that causes diarrhea in nursing piglets. Studies showed that PDCoV uses porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) as an entry receptor, but the infection of pAPN-knockout cells or pigs with PDCoV revealed that pAPN might be not a critical functional receptor, implying there exists an unidentified receptor involved in PDCoV infection. Herein, we report that sialic acid (SA) can act as an attachment receptor for PDCoV invasion and facilitate its infection. We first demonstrated that the carbohydrates destroyed on the cell membrane using NaIO4 can alleviate the susceptibility of cells to PDCoV. Further study showed that the removal of SA, a typical cell-surface carbohydrate, could influence the PDCoV infectivity to the cells significantly, suggesting that SA was involved in the infection. The results of plaque assay and Western blotting revealed that SA promoted PDCoV infection by increasing the number of viruses binding to SA on the cell surface during the adsorption phase, which was also confirmed by atomic force microscopy at the microscopic level. In in vivo experiments, we found that the distribution levels of PDCoV and SA were closely relevant in the swine intestine, which contains huge amount of trypsin. We further confirmed that SA-binding capacity to PDCoV is related to the pre-treatment of PDCoV with trypsin. In conclusion, SA is a novel attachment receptor for PDCoV infection to enhance its attachment to cells, which is dependent on the pre-treatment of trypsin on PDCoV. This study paves the way for dissecting the mechanisms of PDCoV-host interactions and provides new strategies to control PDCoV infection.


Subject(s)
Deltacoronavirus/physiology , N-Acetylneuraminic Acid/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Trypsin/metabolism , Virus Attachment , Animals , Carbohydrates , Cell Line , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cell Membrane/virology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Deltacoronavirus/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Intestines/metabolism , Intestines/virology , Periodic Acid/pharmacology , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Trypsin/pharmacology
4.
J Pediatr ; 243: 214-218.e5, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536930

ABSTRACT

A previously healthy 12-year-old boy had severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) that was rapidly fatal. Autopsy revealed the presence of a large intracardiac thrombus. SARS-CoV-2 spike protein was detected in intestinal cells, supporting the hypothesis that viral presence in the gut may be related to the immunologic response of MIS-C.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intestines , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Intestines/virology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
5.
Physiol Rep ; 9(21): e15061, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513250

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane proteases (TMPRSS) are multifunctional proteins required for SARS-CoV-2 infection or for amino acid (AA) transport, and are abundantly expressed in mammalian small intestine, but the identity of the intestinal cell type(s) and sites of expression are unclear. Here we determined expression of SARS-CoV-2 entry factors in different cell types and then compared it to that of representative AA, electrolyte, and mineral transporters. We tested the hypothesis that SARS-CoV-2, AA, electrolyte, and mineral transporters are expressed heterogeneously in different intestinal cell types by making mouse enteroids enriched in enterocytes (ENT), goblet (GOB), Paneth (PAN), or stem (ISC) cells. Interestingly, the expression of ACE2 was apical and modestly greater in ENT, the same pattern observed for its associated AA transporters B0 AT1 and SIT1. TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 were more highly expressed in crypt-residing ISC. Expression of electrolyte transporters was dramatically heterogeneous. DRA, NBCe1, and NHE3 were greatest in ENT, while those of CFTR and NKCC1 that play important roles in secretory diarrhea, were mainly expressed in ISC and PAN that also displayed immunohistochemically abundant basolateral NKCC1. Intestinal iron transporters were generally expressed higher in ENT and GOB, while calcium transporters were expressed mainly in PAN. Heterogeneous expression of its entry factors suggests that the ability of SARS-CoV-2 to infect the intestine may vary with cell type. Parallel cell-type expression patterns of ACE2 with B0 AT1 and SIT1 provides further evidence of ACE2's multifunctional properties and importance in AA absorption.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Electrolytes/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Intestines/physiology , Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism , Minerals/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/transmission , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Immunohistochemistry , Intestines/cytology , Intestines/virology , Male , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mice , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism
6.
mSphere ; 6(6): e0062321, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501544

ABSTRACT

Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are acute viral gastroenteritis pathogens that affect all age groups, yet no approved vaccines and drugs to treat HuNoV infection are available. In this study, we screened an antiviral compound library to identify compound(s) showing anti-HuNoV activity using a human intestinal enteroid (HIE) culture system in which HuNoVs are able to replicate reproducibly. Dasabuvir (DSB), which has been developed as an anti-hepatitis C virus agent, was found to inhibit HuNoV infection in HIEs at micromolar concentrations. Dasabuvir also inhibited severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and human rotavirus A (RVA) infection in HIEs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to screen an antiviral compound library for HuNoV using HIEs, and we successfully identified dasabuvir as a novel anti-HuNoV inhibitor that warrants further investigation. IMPORTANCE Although there is an urgent need to develop effective antiviral therapy directed against HuNoV infection, compound screening to identify anti-HuNoV drug candidates has not been reported so far. Using a human HIE culture system, our compound screening successfully identified dasabuvir as a novel anti-HuNoV inhibitor. Dasabuvir's inhibitory effect was also demonstrated in the cases of SARS-CoV-2 and RVA infection, highlighting the usefulness of the HIE platform for screening antiviral agents against various viruses that target the intestines.


Subject(s)
2-Naphthylamine/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Intestines/virology , Organoids/virology , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Uracil/analogs & derivatives , Biopsy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Caliciviridae Infections/drug therapy , Cell Line , Humans , Intestines/drug effects , Intestines/pathology , Organoids/drug effects , Rotavirus/drug effects , Rotavirus Infections/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Uracil/pharmacology
7.
Viruses ; 12(8)2020 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453290

ABSTRACT

Enteric viral co-infections, infections involving more than one virus, have been reported for a diverse group of etiological agents, including rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, adenovirus, and enteroviruses. These pathogens are causative agents for acute gastroenteritis and diarrheal disease in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals of all ages globally. Despite virus-virus co-infection events in the intestine being increasingly detected, little is known about their impact on disease outcomes or human health. Here, we review what is currently known about the clinical prevalence of virus-virus co-infections and how co-infections may influence vaccine responses. While experimental investigations into enteric virus co-infections have been limited, we highlight in vivo and in vitro models with exciting potential to investigate viral co-infections. Many features of virus-virus co-infection mechanisms in the intestine remain unclear, and further research will be critical.


Subject(s)
Coinfection/virology , Gastroenteritis/virology , Virus Diseases/physiopathology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/pathogenicity , Animals , Asymptomatic Infections , Disease Models, Animal , Feces/virology , Humans , Intestines/virology , Mice , Primates
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457746

ABSTRACT

Various pathogens, such as Ebola virus, Marburg virus, Nipah virus, Hendra virus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and SARS-CoV-2, are threatening human health worldwide. The natural hosts of these pathogens are thought to be bats. The rousette bat, a megabat, is thought to be a natural reservoir of filoviruses, including Ebola and Marburg viruses. Additionally, the rousette bat showed a transient infection in the experimental inoculation of SARS-CoV-2. In the current study, we established and characterized intestinal organoids from Leschenault's rousette, Rousettus leschenaultii. The established organoids successfully recapitulated the characteristics of intestinal epithelial structure and morphology, and the appropriate supplements necessary for long-term stable culture were identified. The organoid showed susceptibility to Pteropine orthoreovirus (PRV) but not to SARS-CoV-2 in experimental inoculation. This is the first report of the establishment of an expandable organoid culture system of the rousette bat intestinal organoid and its sensitivity to bat-associated viruses, PRV and SARS-CoV-2. This organoid is a useful tool for the elucidation of tolerance mechanisms of the emerging rousette bat-associated viruses such as Ebola and Marburg virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Chiroptera/virology , Organoids/virology , Orthoreovirus/physiology , Reoviridae Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cell Culture Techniques , Cells, Cultured , Chiroptera/physiology , Humans , Intestines/cytology , Intestines/virology , Organoids/cytology , Reoviridae Infections/veterinary
10.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 134, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387323

ABSTRACT

Understanding the factors that contribute to efficient SARS-CoV-2 infection of human cells may provide insights on SARS-CoV-2 transmissibility and pathogenesis, and reveal targets of intervention. Here, we analyze host and viral determinants essential for efficient SARS-CoV-2 infection in both human lung epithelial cells and ex vivo human lung tissues. We identify heparan sulfate as an important attachment factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Next, we show that sialic acids present on ACE2 prevent efficient spike/ACE2-interaction. While SARS-CoV infection is substantially limited by the sialic acid-mediated restriction in both human lung epithelial cells and ex vivo human lung tissues, infection by SARS-CoV-2 is limited to a lesser extent. We further demonstrate that the furin-like cleavage site in SARS-CoV-2 spike is required for efficient virus replication in human lung but not intestinal tissues. These findings provide insights on the efficient SARS-CoV-2 infection of human lungs.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/transmission , Sialic Acids/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Attachment , Animals , Caco-2 Cells , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetinae , Furin/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Heparitin Sulfate/metabolism , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Intestines/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication/physiology
12.
Am J Surg Pathol ; 46(1): 89-96, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254925

ABSTRACT

Approximately 20% of patients with symptomatic syndrome-associated coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection have gastrointestinal bleeding and/or diarrhea. Most are managed without endoscopic evaluation because the risk of practitioner infection outweighs the value of biopsy analysis unless symptoms are life-threatening. As a result, much of what is known about the gastrointestinal manifestations of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has been gleaned from surgical and autopsy cases that suffer from extensive ischemic injury and/or poor preservation. There are no detailed reports describing any other gastrointestinal effects of SARS-CoV-2 even though >3,000,000 people have died from COVID-19 worldwide. The purpose of this study is to report the intestinal findings related to SARS-CoV-2 infection by way of a small case series including one with evidence of direct viral cytopathic effect and 2 with secondary injury attributed to viral infection. Infection can be confirmed by immunohistochemical stains directed against SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, in situ hybridization for spike protein-encoding RNA, and ultrastructural visualization of viruses within the epithelium. It induces cytoplasmic blebs and tufted epithelial cells without inflammation and may not cause symptoms. In contrast, SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause gastrointestinal symptoms after the virus is no longer detected, reflecting systemic activation of cytokine and complement cascades rather than direct viral injury. Reversible mucosal ischemia features microvascular injury with hemorrhage, small vessel thrombosis, and platelet-rich thrombi. Systemic cytokine elaboration and dysbiosis likely explain epithelial cell injury that accompanies diarrheal symptoms. These observations are consistent with clinical and in vitro data and contribute to our understanding of the protean manifestations of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Intestinal Diseases/pathology , Intestinal Diseases/virology , Intestines/pathology , Intestines/virology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/metabolism , Biopsy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/immunology , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/pathology , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/virology , Humans , Intestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Intestinal Diseases/immunology , Intestines/immunology , Ischemia/diagnosis , Ischemia/immunology , Ischemia/pathology , Ischemia/virology , Male , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/pathology , Thrombosis/virology
13.
Gut ; 70(9): 1605-1608, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203978
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 635471, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133914

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), and according to the World Health Organization (WHO), to date, SARS-CoV-2 has already infected more than 91.8 million people worldwide with 1,986,871 deaths. This virus affects mainly the respiratory system, but the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is also a target, meanwhile SARS-CoV-2 was already detected in oesophagus, stomach, duodenum, rectum, and in fecal samples from COVID-19 patients. Prolonged GIT manifestations in COVID-19, mainly the diarrhea, were correlated with decreased richness and diversity of the gut microbiota, immune deregulation and delayed SARS-CoV-2 clearance. So, the bidirectional interactions between the respiratory mucosa and the gut microbiota, known as gut-lung axis, are supposed to be involved in the healthy or pathologic immune responses to SARS-CoV-2. In accordance, the intestinal dysbiosis is associated with increased mortality in other respiratory infections, due to an exacerbated inflammation and decreased regulatory or anti-inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs and in the gut, pointing to this important relationship between both mucosal compartments. Therefore, since the mucous membranes from the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts are affected, in addition to dysbiosis and inflammation, it is plausible to assume that adjunctive therapies based on the modulation of the gut microbiota and re-establishment of eubiosis conditions could be an important therapeutic approach for constraining the harmful consequences of COVID-19. Then, in this review, we summarized studies showing the persistence of SARS-CoV-2 in the gastrointestinal system and the related digestive COVID-19 manifestations, in addition to the literature demonstrating nasopharyngeal, pulmonary and intestinal dysbiosis in COVID-19 patients. Lastly, we showed the potential beneficial role of probiotic administration in other respiratory infections, and discuss the possible role of probiotics as an adjunctive therapy in SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Intestines/microbiology , Lung/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/therapy , Dysbiosis , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Intestines/virology , Lung/virology , Probiotics
15.
Stem Cell Reports ; 16(3): 493-504, 2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099264

ABSTRACT

Enteroviruses, such as EV-A71 and CVA16, mainly infect the human gastrointestinal tract. Human coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, have been variably associated with gastrointestinal symptoms. We aimed to optimize the human intestinal organoids and hypothesize that these optimized intestinal organoids can recapitulate enteric infections of enterovirus and coronavirus. We demonstrate that the optimized human intestinal organoids enable better simulation of the native human intestinal epithelium, and that they are significantly more susceptible to EV-A71 than CVA16. Higher replication of EV-A71 than CVA16 in the intestinal organoids triggers a more vigorous cellular response. However, SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 exhibit distinct dynamics of virus-host interaction; more robust propagation of SARS-CoV triggers minimal cellular response, whereas, SARS-CoV-2 exhibits lower replication capacity but elicits a moderate cellular response. Taken together, the disparate profile of the virus-host interaction of enteroviruses and coronaviruses in human intestinal organoids may unravel the cellular basis of the distinct pathogenicity of these viral pathogens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Enterovirus A, Human/pathogenicity , Enterovirus Infections/virology , Intestines/virology , Organoids/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/physiology
17.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 20296, 2020 11 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938317

ABSTRACT

Bats are natural reservoirs for potential zoonotic viruses. In this study, next-generation sequencing was performed to obtain entire genome sequences of picornavirus from a picornavirus-positive bat feces sample (16BF77) and to explore novel viruses in a pooled bat sample (16BP) from samples collected in South Korea, 2016. Fourteen mammalian viral sequences were identified from 16BF77 and 29 from 16BP, and verified by RT-PCR. The most abundant virus in 16BF77 was picornavirus. Highly variable picornavirus sequences encoding 3Dpol were classified into genera Kobuvirus, Shanbavirus, and an unassigned group within the family Picornaviridae. Amino acid differences between these partial 3Dpol sequences were ≥ 65.7%. Results showed that one bat was co-infected by picornaviruses of more than two genera. Retrovirus, coronavirus, and rotavirus A sequences also were found in the BP sample. The retrovirus and coronavirus genomes were identified in nine and eight bats, respectively. Korean bat retroviruses and coronavirus demonstrated strong genetic relationships with a Chinese bat retrovirus (RfRV) and coronavirus (HKU5-1), respectively. A co-infection was identified in one bat with a retrovirus and a coronavirus. Our results indicate that Korean bats were multiply infected by several mammal viruses.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera/virology , Feces/virology , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods , Mouth/virology , RNA Viruses/genetics , Animals , Brain/virology , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus/physiology , Geography , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Intestines/virology , Liver/virology , Lung/virology , Phylogeny , Picornaviridae/classification , Picornaviridae/genetics , Picornaviridae/physiology , RNA Viruses/classification , RNA Viruses/physiology , Republic of Korea , Retroviridae/classification , Retroviridae/genetics , Retroviridae/physiology , Rotavirus/classification , Rotavirus/genetics , Rotavirus/physiology
18.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 2663-2672, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919316

ABSTRACT

Rapid accumulation of viral proteins in host cells render viruses highly dependent on cellular chaperones including heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Three highly pathogenic human coronaviruses, including MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, have emerged in the past 2 decades. However, there is no approved antiviral agent against these coronaviruses. We inspected the role of Hsp90 for coronavirus propagation. First, an Hsp90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, significantly suppressed MERS-CoV propagation in cell lines and physiological-relevant human intestinal organoids. Second, siRNA depletion of Hsp90ß, but not Hsp90α, significantly restricted MERS-CoV replication and abolished virus spread. Third, Hsp90ß interaction with MERS-CoV nucleoprotein (NP) was revealed in a co-immunoprecipitation assay. Hsp90ß is required to maintain NP stability. Fourth, 17-AAG substantially inhibited the propagation of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. Collectively, Hsp90 is a host dependency factor for human coronavirus MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV and SARS-COV-2. Hsp90 inhibitors can be repurposed as a potent and broad-spectrum antiviral against human coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzoquinones/pharmacology , HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/drug effects , Lactams, Macrocyclic/pharmacology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , A549 Cells , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Intestines/virology , Organ Culture Techniques , RNA, Small Interfering , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
20.
Vet Microbiol ; 247: 108785, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-827867

ABSTRACT

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a novel swine enteropathogenic coronavirus that causes watery diarrhea, vomiting and mortality in nursing piglets. Type III interferons (IFN-λs) are the major antiviral cytokines in intestinal epithelial cells, the target cells in vivo for PDCoV. In this study, we found that PDCoV infection remarkably inhibited Sendai virus-induced IFN-λ1 production by suppressing transcription factors IRF and NF-κB in IPI-2I cells, a line of porcine intestinal mucosal epithelial cells. We also confirmed that PDCoV infection impeded the activation of IFN-λ1 promoter stimulated by RIG-I, MDA5 and MAVS, but not by TBK1 and IRF1. Although the expression levels of IRF1 and MAVS were not changed, PDCoV infection resulted in reduction of the number of peroxisomes, the platform for MAVS to activate IRF1, and subsequent type III IFN production. Taken together, our study demonstrates that PDCoV suppresses type III IFN responses to circumvent the host's antiviral immunity.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Interferons/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Cell Line , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferon Regulatory Factor-1/immunology , Interferons/immunology , Intestines/cytology , Intestines/virology , Kidney/cytology , Kidney/virology , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/immunology , Sendai virus/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Swine/virology , Swine Diseases/immunology , Swine Diseases/virology
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