Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 263, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266944

ABSTRACT

Neurovascular involvement is a frequent occurring reported in COVID-19 patients. However, spontaneous hematomas of the corpus callosum are exceptionally seen. The authors of this article aim to report an unusual case of corpus callosum hematoma in a COVID-19 patient and discuss potential etiologies and mechanisms responsible for intracranial hemorrhage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Corpus Callosum/pathology , Hematoma/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Corpus Callosum/virology , Hematoma/etiology , Hematoma/virology , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/etiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/virology , Male , Middle Aged
2.
Int J Stroke ; 16(5): 573-584, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to profound changes in the organization of health care systems worldwide. AIMS: We sought to measure the global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the volumes for mechanical thrombectomy, stroke, and intracranial hemorrhage hospitalizations over a three-month period at the height of the pandemic (1 March-31 May 2020) compared with two control three-month periods (immediately preceding and one year prior). METHODS: Retrospective, observational, international study, across 6 continents, 40 countries, and 187 comprehensive stroke centers. The diagnoses were identified by their ICD-10 codes and/or classifications in stroke databases at participating centers. RESULTS: The hospitalization volumes for any stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and mechanical thrombectomy were 26,699, 4002, and 5191 in the three months immediately before versus 21,576, 3540, and 4533 during the first three pandemic months, representing declines of 19.2% (95%CI, -19.7 to -18.7), 11.5% (95%CI, -12.6 to -10.6), and 12.7% (95%CI, -13.6 to -11.8), respectively. The decreases were noted across centers with high, mid, and low COVID-19 hospitalization burden, and also across high, mid, and low volume stroke/mechanical thrombectomy centers. High-volume COVID-19 centers (-20.5%) had greater declines in mechanical thrombectomy volumes than mid- (-10.1%) and low-volume (-8.7%) centers (p < 0.0001). There was a 1.5% stroke rate across 54,366 COVID-19 hospitalizations. SARS-CoV-2 infection was noted in 3.9% (784/20,250) of all stroke admissions. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a global decline in the volume of overall stroke hospitalizations, mechanical thrombectomy procedures, and intracranial hemorrhage admission volumes. Despite geographic variations, these volume reductions were observed regardless of COVID-19 hospitalization burden and pre-pandemic stroke/mechanical thrombectomy volumes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Hospitalization/trends , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, High-Volume/trends , Hospitals, Low-Volume/trends , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Time Factors
3.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 42(6): 1017-1022, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067632

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Indirect consequences of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic include those related to failure of patients to seek or receive timely medical attention for seemingly unrelated disease. We report our experience with stroke code imaging during the early pandemic months of 2020. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of stroke codes during the 2020 pandemic and both 2020 and matched 2019 prepandemic months was performed. Patient variables were age, sex, hospital location, and severity of symptoms based on the NIHSS. We reviewed the results of CT of the head, CTA, CTP, and MR imaging examinations and classified a case as imaging-positive if any of the imaging studies yielded a result that related to the clinical indication for the study. Both year-to-year and sequential comparisons were performed between pandemic and prepandemic months. RESULTS: A statistically significant decrease was observed in monthly stroke code volumes accompanied by a statistically significant increased proportion of positive imaging findings during the pandemic compared with the same months in the prior year (P < .001) and prepandemic months in the same year (P < .001). We also observed statistically significant increases in average NIHSS scores (P = .045 and P = .03) and the proportion of inpatient stroke codes (P = .003 and P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: During our pandemic period, there was a significantly decreased number of stroke codes but simultaneous increases in positivity rates, symptom severity, and inpatient codes. We postulate that this finding reflects the documented reluctance of patients to seek medical care during the pandemic, with the shift toward a greater proportion of inpatient stroke codes potentially reflecting the neurologic complications of the virus itself.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Severity of Illness Index , Stroke/diagnosis , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Age Distribution , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Diagnostic Imaging , Female , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy
4.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 199: 106227, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023513

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients with COVID-19 to non-COVID-19 controls, and to describe changes in stroke admission patterns during the pandemic. METHODS: This is a single center, retrospective, observational study. All consecutive patients admitted with primary diagnosis of ischemic/ hemorrhagic stroke between March1st -May10th 2020 were included and compared with the same time period in 2019. RESULTS: There was a 41.9% increase in stroke admissions in 2020 (148 vs 210,P = .001). When comparing all ischemic strokes, higher rate of large vessel occlusion (LVO) (18.3% vs 33.8%,P = .008) and significant delay in initiation of mechanical thrombectomy after hospital arrival (67.75 vs 104.30 minutes,P = .001) was observed in 2020. When comparing all hemorrhagic strokes, there were no differences between the two years. Among 591 COVID-19 admissions, 31 (5.24%) patients with stroke including 19 with ischemic (3.21%) and 12 with hemorrhagic stroke (2.03%) were identified. Patients with COVID-19 and ischemic stroke were significantly younger (58.74 vs 48.11 years,P = .002), predominantly male (68.18% vs 94.74%,P = .016), had lesser vascular risk factors, had more severe clinical presentation (NIHSS 7.01 vs 17.05,P < .001), and higher rate of LVO (23.6% vs. 63.1%,P = .006). There was no difference in the rate of endovascular thrombectomy, but time to groin puncture was significantly longer in COVID-19 patients (83.41 vs 129.50 minutes,P = .003). For hemorrhagic stroke, COVID-19 patients did not differ from non-COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke continues to occur during this pandemic and stroke pathways have been affected by the pandemic. Stroke occurs in approximately 5% of patients with COVID-19. COVID-19 associated ischemic stroke occurs in predominantly male patients who are younger, with fewer vascular risk factors, can be more severe, and have higher rates of LVO. Despite an increase in LVO during the pandemic, treatment with mechanical thrombectomy has not increased. COVID-19 associated hemorrhagic stroke does not differ from non-COVID-19 hemorrhagic stroke patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitalization , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Adult , Aged , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Endovascular Procedures , Female , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/complications , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stroke/mortality , Survival Rate , Thrombectomy , United Arab Emirates
5.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(12): 105321, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-872317

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted global healthcare systems and this may affect stroke care and outcomes. This study examines the changes in stroke epidemiology and care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Zanjan Province, Iran. METHODS: This study is part of the CASCADE international initiative. From February 18, 2019, to July 18, 2020, we followed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke hospitalization rates and outcomes in Valiasr Hospital, Zanjan, Iran. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model and an interrupted time series analysis (ITS) to identify changes in stroke hospitalization rate, baseline stroke severity [measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)], disability [measured by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS)], presentation time (last seen normal to hospital presentation), thrombolytic therapy rate, median door-to-needle time, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality. We compared in-hospital mortality between study periods using Cox-regression model. RESULTS: During the study period, 1,026 stroke patients were hospitalized. Stroke hospitalization rates per 100,000 population decreased from 68.09 before the pandemic to 44.50 during the pandemic, with a significant decline in both Bayesian [Beta: -1.034; Standard Error (SE): 0.22, 95% CrI: -1.48, -0.59] and ITS analysis (estimate: -1.03, SE = 0.24, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, we observed lower admission rates for patients with mild (NIHSS < 5) ischemic stroke (p < 0.0001). Although, the presentation time and door-to-needle time did not change during the pandemic, a lower proportion of patients received thrombolysis (-10.1%; p = 0.004). We did not see significant changes in admission rate to the stroke unit and in-hospital mortality rate; however, disability at discharge increased (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: In Zanjan, Iran, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted stroke outcomes and altered the delivery of stroke care. Observed lower admission rates for milder stroke may possibly be due to fear of exposure related to COVID-19. The decrease in patients treated with thrombolysis and the increased disability at discharge may indicate changes in the delivery of stroke care and increased pressure on existing stroke acute and subacute services. The results of this research will contribute to a similar analysis of the larger CASCADE dataset in order to confirm findings at a global scale and improve measures to ensure the best quality of care for stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Hospitalization/trends , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bayes Theorem , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/mortality , Iran/epidemiology , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Recovery of Function , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(11): 105314, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-753197

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is associated with stroke. The role of sex on stroke outcome has not been investigated. To objective of this paper is to describe the characteristics of a diverse cohort of acute stroke patients with COVID-19 disease and determine the role of sex on outcome. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients with acute stroke and SARS-CoV-2 infection admitted between March 15 to May 15, 2020 to one of the six participating comprehensive stroke centers. Baseline characteristics, stroke subtype, workup, treatment and outcome are presented as total number and percentage or median and interquartile range. Outcome at discharge was determined by the modified Rankin Scale Score (mRS). Variables and outcomes were compared for males and females using univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: The study included 83 patients, 47% of which were Black, 28% Hispanics/Latinos, and 16% whites. Median age was 64 years. Approximately 89% had at least one preexisting vascular risk factor (VRF). The most common complications were respiratory failure (59%) and septic shock (34%). Compared with females, a higher proportion of males experienced severe SARS-CoV-2 symptoms requiring ICU hospitalization (73% vs. 49%; p = 0.04). When divided by stroke subtype, there were 77% ischemic, 19% intracerebral hemorrhage and 3% subarachnoid hemorrhage. The most common ischemic stroke etiologies were cryptogenic (39%) and cardioembolic (27%). Compared with females, males had higher mortality (38% vs. 13%; p = 0.02) and were less likely to be discharged home (12% vs. 33%; p = 0.04). After adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, and number of VRFs, mRS was higher in males than in females (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.03-2.09). CONCLUSION: In this cohort of SARS-CoV-2 stroke patients, most had clinical evidence of coronavirus infection on admission and preexisting VRFs. Severe in-hospital complications and worse outcomes after ischemic strokes were higher in males, than females.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Status Disparities , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Chicago/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy , Time Factors
7.
Stroke ; 51(9): 2664-2673, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anecdotal reports suggest fewer patients with stroke symptoms are presenting to hospitals during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We quantify trends in stroke code calls and treatments at 3 Connecticut hospitals during the local emergence of COVID-19 and examine patient characteristics and stroke process measures at a Comprehensive Stroke Center (CSC) before and during the pandemic. METHODS: Stroke code activity was analyzed from January 1 to April 28, 2020, and corresponding dates in 2019. Piecewise linear regression and spline models identified when stroke codes in 2020 began to decline and when they fell below 2019 levels. Patient-level data were analyzed in February versus March and April 2020 at the CSC to identify differences in patient characteristics during the pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 822 stroke codes were activated at 3 hospitals from January 1 to April 28, 2020. The number of stroke codes/wk decreased by 12.8/wk from February 18 to March 16 (P=0.0360) with nadir of 39.6% of expected stroke codes called from March 10 to 16 (30% decrease in total stroke codes during the pandemic weeks in 2020 versus 2019). There was no commensurate increase in within-network telestroke utilization. Compared with before the pandemic (n=167), pandemic-epoch stroke code patients at the CSC (n=211) were more likely to have histories of hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, and substance abuse; no or public health insurance; lower median household income; and to live in the CSC city (P<0.05). There was no difference in age, sex, race/ethnicity, stroke severity, time to presentation, door-to-needle/door-to-reperfusion times, or discharge modified Rankin Scale. CONCLUSIONS: Hospital presentation for stroke-like symptoms decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, without differences in stroke severity or early outcomes. Individuals living outside of the CSC city were less likely to present for stroke codes at the CSC during the pandemic. Public health initiatives to increase awareness of presenting for non-COVID-19 medical emergencies such as stroke during the pandemic are critical.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/physiopathology , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Connecticut/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Income , Insurance, Health , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/physiopathology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Male , Medically Uninsured , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/physiopathology , Stroke/therapy , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Telemedicine , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy
8.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 34(11): 3006-3012, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-676811

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Anticoagulation may be a challenge in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation due to endothelial injury and dysregulation of coagulation, which may increase the risk of thrombotic and bleeding complications. This report was created to describe the authors' single institutional experience, with emphasis on the high rate of intracranial hemorrhage for the first 10 patients with COVID-19 placed on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO). DESIGN: Case series, retrospective analysis. SETTING: Single institution. PARTICIPANTS: Ten patients. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patient characteristics, mortality, stroke rate, and length of stay data were collected in all patients. In addition, laboratory values of D-dimer and C-reactive protein and standard measurements of prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time were collected on all patients. Ten patients, each confirmed with COVID-19 via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, were supported on VV ECMO for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for a mean duration of 9.4 ± 7 days. Four of 10 patients had hemorrhagic strokes, 3 of which resulted in death. At 30 days after initiation of VV ECMO, a total of 7 survivors included 6 patients discharged from the hospital and 1 patient who remained in the intensive care unit. CONCLUSIONS: In this small study of 10 patients, intracranial hemorrhage was a common complication, resulting in a high rate of death. The authors urge caution in the anticoagulation management of VV ECMO for patients with severe ARDS and COVID-19 patients. Close monitoring of all hematologic parameters is recommended during ECMO support while awaiting larger, multicenter studies to examine the best practice.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Intracranial Hemorrhages/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 198: 106112, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-669659

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aim to characterize the incidence, risk for mortality, and identify risk factors for mortality in patients presenting with hemorrhage and COVID-19. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included a cohort of patients admitted to one of three major hospitals of our healthcare network including, an academic medical center and comprehensive stroke center, which accepts transfers for complex cases from eight community hospitals, during March 1 to May 1, 2020. All patients that received imaging of the neuroaxis and had positive PCR testing for COVID-19 were identified and reviewed by an attending neuroradiologist. Demographics and comorbidities were recorded. Biomarkers were recorded from the day of the hemorrhagic event. Vital signs from the day of the hemorrhagic event mechanical ventilation orders at admission were recorded. Imaging findings were divided into 5 subtypes; acute subdural hematoma (SDH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), multi-compartmental hemorrhage (MCH), multi-focal intracerebral hemorrhage (MFH), and focal intracerebral hemorrhage (fICH). Outcomes were recorded as non-routine discharge and mortality. RESULTS: We found a total of 35 out of 5227 patients with COVID-19 that had hemorrhage of some kind. Mortality for the entire cohort was 45.7 % (n = 16). SDH patients had a mortality rate of 35.3 % (n = 6), SAH had a mortality of 50 % (n = 1), MCH patients had a mortality of 71.4 % (n = 5), MFH patients had a mortality of 50 % (n = 2), fICH patients had a mortality of 40 % (n = 2). Patients with severe pulmonary COVID requiring mechanical ventilation (OR 10.24 [.43-243.12] p = 0.015), with INR > 1.2 on the day of the hemorrhagic event (OR 14.36 [1.69-122.14] p = 0.015], and patients presenting with spontaneous vs. traumatic hemorrhage (OR 6.11 [.31-118.89] p = 0.023) had significantly higher risk for mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Hemorrhagic presentations with COVID-19 are a rare but serious way in which the illness can manifest. It is important for neurosurgeons to realize that patients can present with these findings without primary pulmonary symptoms, and that severe pulmonary symptoms, elevated INR, and spontaneous hemorrhagic presentations is associated with increased risk for mortality.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Incidence , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate
10.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(10): 105114, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640910

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effect of the Coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on stroke care and the impact of the epidemic on acute stroke hospitalizations has not been described. METHODS: We analyze the stroke admission rate in three hospitals in New York City from January 1, 2020 through April 17, 2020, identifying all cases of acute ischemic stroke, intraparenchymal hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. RESULTS: We confirmed 518 cases of out-of-hospital stroke. During the baseline period up to February 25, 2020, the daily stroke admission rate was stable, with the slope of the regression describing the number of admissions over time equal to -0.33 (se = 1.21), not significantly different from 0 (p = 0.79), with daily admissions averaging 41. During the pandemic period, the slope was -4.4 (se = 1.00); i.e., the number of stroke admissions decreased an average of 4.4 per week, (p = 0.005), with weekly admissions averaging 23, a reduction of 44% versus baseline. This general result was not different by patient age, sex, or race/ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: The weekly stroke admission rate started declining two weeks prior to the local surge of coronavirus admissions. The consequences of lack of diagnosis and treatment of a large proportion of acute stroke patients are likely severe and lasting.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Patient Admission/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Stroke/therapy , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/virology , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/virology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy , Time Factors
11.
Int J Stroke ; 15(7): 733-742, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-636180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 is associated with neurological manifestations including stroke. OBJECTIVES: We present a case series of coronavirus disease 2019 patients from two institutions with acute cerebrovascular pathologies. In addition, we present a pooled analysis of published data on large vessel occlusion in the setting of coronavirus disease 2019 and a concise summary of the pathophysiology of acute cerebrovascular disease in the setting of coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: A retrospective study across two institutions was conducted between 20 March 2020 and 20 May 2020, for patients developing acute cerebrovascular disease and diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019. We performed a literature review using the PubMed search engine. RESULTS: The total sample size was 22 patients. The mean age was 59.5 years, and 12 patients were female. The cerebrovascular pathologies were 17 cases of acute ischemic stroke, 3 cases of aneurysm rupture, and 2 cases of sinus thrombosis. Of the stroke and sinus thrombosis patients, the mean National Institute of Health Stroke Scale was 13.8 ± 8.0, and 16 (84.2%) patients underwent a mechanical thrombectomy procedure. A favorable thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score was achieved in all patients. Of the 16 patients that underwent a mechanical thrombectomy, the mortality incidence was five (31.3%). Of all patients (22), three (13.6%) patients developed hemorrhagic conversion requiring decompressive surgery. Eleven (50%) patients had a poor functional status (modified Rankin Score 3-6) at discharge, and the total mortality incidence was eight (36.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Despite timely intervention and favorable reperfusion, the mortality rate in coronavirus disease 2019 patients with large vessel occlusion was high in our series and in the pooled analysis. Notable features were younger age group, involvement of both the arterial and venous vasculature, multivessel involvement, and complicated procedures due to the clot consistency and burden.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Brain Ischemia/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL