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1.
Int J Stroke ; 16(5): 573-584, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to profound changes in the organization of health care systems worldwide. AIMS: We sought to measure the global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the volumes for mechanical thrombectomy, stroke, and intracranial hemorrhage hospitalizations over a three-month period at the height of the pandemic (1 March-31 May 2020) compared with two control three-month periods (immediately preceding and one year prior). METHODS: Retrospective, observational, international study, across 6 continents, 40 countries, and 187 comprehensive stroke centers. The diagnoses were identified by their ICD-10 codes and/or classifications in stroke databases at participating centers. RESULTS: The hospitalization volumes for any stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and mechanical thrombectomy were 26,699, 4002, and 5191 in the three months immediately before versus 21,576, 3540, and 4533 during the first three pandemic months, representing declines of 19.2% (95%CI, -19.7 to -18.7), 11.5% (95%CI, -12.6 to -10.6), and 12.7% (95%CI, -13.6 to -11.8), respectively. The decreases were noted across centers with high, mid, and low COVID-19 hospitalization burden, and also across high, mid, and low volume stroke/mechanical thrombectomy centers. High-volume COVID-19 centers (-20.5%) had greater declines in mechanical thrombectomy volumes than mid- (-10.1%) and low-volume (-8.7%) centers (p < 0.0001). There was a 1.5% stroke rate across 54,366 COVID-19 hospitalizations. SARS-CoV-2 infection was noted in 3.9% (784/20,250) of all stroke admissions. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a global decline in the volume of overall stroke hospitalizations, mechanical thrombectomy procedures, and intracranial hemorrhage admission volumes. Despite geographic variations, these volume reductions were observed regardless of COVID-19 hospitalization burden and pre-pandemic stroke/mechanical thrombectomy volumes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Hospitalization/trends , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, High-Volume/trends , Hospitals, Low-Volume/trends , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Time Factors
2.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(4): 105603, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065395

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical, laboratory, temporal, radiographic, and outcome features of acute Intracranial Hemorrhage (ICH) in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Retrospective, observational, consecutive case series of patients admitted with ICH to Maimonides Medical Center from March 1 through July 31, 2020, who had confirmed or highly suspected COVID-19. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, imaging, and outcome data were analyzed. ICH rates among all strokes were compared to the same time period in 2019 in two-week time intervals. Correlation of systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) to clinical outcomes were performed. RESULTS: Of 324 patients who presented with stroke, 65 (20%) were diagnosed with non-traumatic ICH: 8 had confirmed and 3 had highly suspected COVID-19. Nine (82%) had at least one associated risk factor for ICH. Three ICHs occurred during inpatient anticoagulation. More than half (6) suffered either deep or cerebellar hemorrhages; only 2 were lobar hemorrhages. Two of 8 patients with severe pneumonia survived. During the NYC COVID-19 peak period in April, ICH comprised the highest percentage of all strokes (40%), and then steadily decreased week-after-week (p = 0.02). SBPV and NLR were moderately and weakly positively correlated to discharge modified Rankin Scale, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 associated ICH is often associated with at least one known ICH risk factor and severe pneumonia. There was a suggestive relative surge in ICH among all stroke types during the first peak of the NYC pandemic. It is important to be vigilant of ICH as a possible and important manifestation of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Male , New York/epidemiology , Prevalence , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
3.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 199: 106227, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023513

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients with COVID-19 to non-COVID-19 controls, and to describe changes in stroke admission patterns during the pandemic. METHODS: This is a single center, retrospective, observational study. All consecutive patients admitted with primary diagnosis of ischemic/ hemorrhagic stroke between March1st -May10th 2020 were included and compared with the same time period in 2019. RESULTS: There was a 41.9% increase in stroke admissions in 2020 (148 vs 210,P = .001). When comparing all ischemic strokes, higher rate of large vessel occlusion (LVO) (18.3% vs 33.8%,P = .008) and significant delay in initiation of mechanical thrombectomy after hospital arrival (67.75 vs 104.30 minutes,P = .001) was observed in 2020. When comparing all hemorrhagic strokes, there were no differences between the two years. Among 591 COVID-19 admissions, 31 (5.24%) patients with stroke including 19 with ischemic (3.21%) and 12 with hemorrhagic stroke (2.03%) were identified. Patients with COVID-19 and ischemic stroke were significantly younger (58.74 vs 48.11 years,P = .002), predominantly male (68.18% vs 94.74%,P = .016), had lesser vascular risk factors, had more severe clinical presentation (NIHSS 7.01 vs 17.05,P < .001), and higher rate of LVO (23.6% vs. 63.1%,P = .006). There was no difference in the rate of endovascular thrombectomy, but time to groin puncture was significantly longer in COVID-19 patients (83.41 vs 129.50 minutes,P = .003). For hemorrhagic stroke, COVID-19 patients did not differ from non-COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke continues to occur during this pandemic and stroke pathways have been affected by the pandemic. Stroke occurs in approximately 5% of patients with COVID-19. COVID-19 associated ischemic stroke occurs in predominantly male patients who are younger, with fewer vascular risk factors, can be more severe, and have higher rates of LVO. Despite an increase in LVO during the pandemic, treatment with mechanical thrombectomy has not increased. COVID-19 associated hemorrhagic stroke does not differ from non-COVID-19 hemorrhagic stroke patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitalization , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Adult , Aged , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Endovascular Procedures , Female , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/complications , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stroke/mortality , Survival Rate , Thrombectomy , United Arab Emirates
4.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(3): 105536, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988559

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a comprehensive impact on healthcare services worldwide. We sought to determine whether COVID-19 affected the treatment and prognosis of hemorrhagic stroke in a regional medical center in mainland China. METHODS: Patients with hemorrhagic stroke admitted in the Neurosurgery Department of West China Hospital from January 24, 2020, to March 25, 2020 (COVID-19 period), and from January 24, 2019, to March 25, 2019 (pre-COVID-19 period), were identified. Clinical characteristics, hospital arrival to neurosurgery department arrival time (door-to-department time), reporting rate of pneumonia and 3-month mRS (outcome) were compared. RESULTS: A total of 224 patients in the pre-COVID-19 period were compared with 126 patients in the COVID-19 period. Milder stroke severity was observed in the COVID-19 period (NIHSS 6 [2-20] vs. 3 [2-15], p = 0.005). The median door-to-department time in the COVID-19 period was approximately 50 minutes longer than that in the pre-COVID-19 period (96.5 [70.3-193.3] vs. 144.5 [93.8-504.5], p = 0.000). A higher rate of pneumonia complications was reported in the COVID-19 period (40.6% vs. 60.7%, p = 0.000). In patients with moderate hemorrhagic stroke, the percentage of good outcomes (mRS < 3) in the pre-COVID-19 period was much higher than that in the COVID-19 period (53.1% vs. 26.3%, p = 0.047). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 may have several impacts on the treatment of hemorrhagic stroke and may influence the clinical outcomes of specific patients. Improvements in the treatment process for patients with moderate stroke may help to improve the overall outcome of hemorrhagic stroke during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Pandemics , Stroke/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/complications , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgical Procedures , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/etiology , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
5.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(12): 105321, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-872317

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted global healthcare systems and this may affect stroke care and outcomes. This study examines the changes in stroke epidemiology and care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Zanjan Province, Iran. METHODS: This study is part of the CASCADE international initiative. From February 18, 2019, to July 18, 2020, we followed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke hospitalization rates and outcomes in Valiasr Hospital, Zanjan, Iran. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model and an interrupted time series analysis (ITS) to identify changes in stroke hospitalization rate, baseline stroke severity [measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)], disability [measured by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS)], presentation time (last seen normal to hospital presentation), thrombolytic therapy rate, median door-to-needle time, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality. We compared in-hospital mortality between study periods using Cox-regression model. RESULTS: During the study period, 1,026 stroke patients were hospitalized. Stroke hospitalization rates per 100,000 population decreased from 68.09 before the pandemic to 44.50 during the pandemic, with a significant decline in both Bayesian [Beta: -1.034; Standard Error (SE): 0.22, 95% CrI: -1.48, -0.59] and ITS analysis (estimate: -1.03, SE = 0.24, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, we observed lower admission rates for patients with mild (NIHSS < 5) ischemic stroke (p < 0.0001). Although, the presentation time and door-to-needle time did not change during the pandemic, a lower proportion of patients received thrombolysis (-10.1%; p = 0.004). We did not see significant changes in admission rate to the stroke unit and in-hospital mortality rate; however, disability at discharge increased (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: In Zanjan, Iran, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted stroke outcomes and altered the delivery of stroke care. Observed lower admission rates for milder stroke may possibly be due to fear of exposure related to COVID-19. The decrease in patients treated with thrombolysis and the increased disability at discharge may indicate changes in the delivery of stroke care and increased pressure on existing stroke acute and subacute services. The results of this research will contribute to a similar analysis of the larger CASCADE dataset in order to confirm findings at a global scale and improve measures to ensure the best quality of care for stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Hospitalization/trends , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bayes Theorem , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/mortality , Iran/epidemiology , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Recovery of Function , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(11): 105314, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-753197

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is associated with stroke. The role of sex on stroke outcome has not been investigated. To objective of this paper is to describe the characteristics of a diverse cohort of acute stroke patients with COVID-19 disease and determine the role of sex on outcome. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients with acute stroke and SARS-CoV-2 infection admitted between March 15 to May 15, 2020 to one of the six participating comprehensive stroke centers. Baseline characteristics, stroke subtype, workup, treatment and outcome are presented as total number and percentage or median and interquartile range. Outcome at discharge was determined by the modified Rankin Scale Score (mRS). Variables and outcomes were compared for males and females using univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: The study included 83 patients, 47% of which were Black, 28% Hispanics/Latinos, and 16% whites. Median age was 64 years. Approximately 89% had at least one preexisting vascular risk factor (VRF). The most common complications were respiratory failure (59%) and septic shock (34%). Compared with females, a higher proportion of males experienced severe SARS-CoV-2 symptoms requiring ICU hospitalization (73% vs. 49%; p = 0.04). When divided by stroke subtype, there were 77% ischemic, 19% intracerebral hemorrhage and 3% subarachnoid hemorrhage. The most common ischemic stroke etiologies were cryptogenic (39%) and cardioembolic (27%). Compared with females, males had higher mortality (38% vs. 13%; p = 0.02) and were less likely to be discharged home (12% vs. 33%; p = 0.04). After adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, and number of VRFs, mRS was higher in males than in females (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.03-2.09). CONCLUSION: In this cohort of SARS-CoV-2 stroke patients, most had clinical evidence of coronavirus infection on admission and preexisting VRFs. Severe in-hospital complications and worse outcomes after ischemic strokes were higher in males, than females.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Status Disparities , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Chicago/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy , Time Factors
7.
Stroke ; 51(9): 2664-2673, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anecdotal reports suggest fewer patients with stroke symptoms are presenting to hospitals during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We quantify trends in stroke code calls and treatments at 3 Connecticut hospitals during the local emergence of COVID-19 and examine patient characteristics and stroke process measures at a Comprehensive Stroke Center (CSC) before and during the pandemic. METHODS: Stroke code activity was analyzed from January 1 to April 28, 2020, and corresponding dates in 2019. Piecewise linear regression and spline models identified when stroke codes in 2020 began to decline and when they fell below 2019 levels. Patient-level data were analyzed in February versus March and April 2020 at the CSC to identify differences in patient characteristics during the pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 822 stroke codes were activated at 3 hospitals from January 1 to April 28, 2020. The number of stroke codes/wk decreased by 12.8/wk from February 18 to March 16 (P=0.0360) with nadir of 39.6% of expected stroke codes called from March 10 to 16 (30% decrease in total stroke codes during the pandemic weeks in 2020 versus 2019). There was no commensurate increase in within-network telestroke utilization. Compared with before the pandemic (n=167), pandemic-epoch stroke code patients at the CSC (n=211) were more likely to have histories of hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, and substance abuse; no or public health insurance; lower median household income; and to live in the CSC city (P<0.05). There was no difference in age, sex, race/ethnicity, stroke severity, time to presentation, door-to-needle/door-to-reperfusion times, or discharge modified Rankin Scale. CONCLUSIONS: Hospital presentation for stroke-like symptoms decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, without differences in stroke severity or early outcomes. Individuals living outside of the CSC city were less likely to present for stroke codes at the CSC during the pandemic. Public health initiatives to increase awareness of presenting for non-COVID-19 medical emergencies such as stroke during the pandemic are critical.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/physiopathology , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Connecticut/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Income , Insurance, Health , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/physiopathology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Male , Medically Uninsured , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/physiopathology , Stroke/therapy , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Telemedicine , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy
8.
World Neurosurg ; 141: 157-161, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-648118

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: When Belgium's coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak began in March 2020, our neurosurgical department followed the protocol of most surgical departments in the world and postponed elective surgery. However, patients with tumor-like brain lesions requiring urgent surgery still received treatment as usual, in order to ensure ongoing neurooncologic care. From a series of 31 patients admitted for brain surgery, 3 were confirmed as infected by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. CASE DESCRIPTION: We present the clinical outcomes of these 3 COVID-19 patients, who underwent an intracerebral biopsy in our department during April 2020. All suffered from a diffuse intraparenchymal hemorrhage postoperatively. Unfortunately, we were not able to identify a clear etiology of these postoperative complications. It could be hypothesized that an active COVID-19 infection status may be related to a higher bleeding risk. The remaining 28 neurooncologic non-COVID-19 patients underwent uneventful surgery during the same period. CONCLUSIONS: This case series reports the previously unreported and unexpected outcomes of COVID-19 patients suffering from acute hemorrhage after intracerebral biopsy procedures. Although no direct relation can yet be established, we recommend the neurosurgical community be cautious in such cases.


Subject(s)
Biopsy/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Intracranial Hemorrhages/etiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , Brain Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Epilepsy/surgery , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Positron-Emission Tomography , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Treatment Outcome
9.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(10): 105114, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640910

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effect of the Coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on stroke care and the impact of the epidemic on acute stroke hospitalizations has not been described. METHODS: We analyze the stroke admission rate in three hospitals in New York City from January 1, 2020 through April 17, 2020, identifying all cases of acute ischemic stroke, intraparenchymal hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. RESULTS: We confirmed 518 cases of out-of-hospital stroke. During the baseline period up to February 25, 2020, the daily stroke admission rate was stable, with the slope of the regression describing the number of admissions over time equal to -0.33 (se = 1.21), not significantly different from 0 (p = 0.79), with daily admissions averaging 41. During the pandemic period, the slope was -4.4 (se = 1.00); i.e., the number of stroke admissions decreased an average of 4.4 per week, (p = 0.005), with weekly admissions averaging 23, a reduction of 44% versus baseline. This general result was not different by patient age, sex, or race/ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: The weekly stroke admission rate started declining two weeks prior to the local surge of coronavirus admissions. The consequences of lack of diagnosis and treatment of a large proportion of acute stroke patients are likely severe and lasting.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Patient Admission/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Stroke/therapy , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/virology , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/virology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy , Time Factors
10.
Stroke ; 51(8): 2315-2321, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-596641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Since the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, doctors and public authorities have demonstrated concern about the reduction in quality of care for other health conditions due to social restrictions and lack of resources. Using a population-based stroke registry, we investigated the impact of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in stroke admissions in Joinville, Brazil. METHODS: Patients admitted after the onset of COVID-19 restrictions in the city (defined as March 17, 2020) were compared with those admitted in 2019. We analyzed differences between stroke incidence, types, severity, reperfusion therapies, and time from stroke onset to admission. Statistical tests were also performed to compare the 30 days before and after COVID-19 to the same period in 2019. RESULTS: We observed a decrease in total stroke admissions from an average of 12.9/100 000 per month in 2019 to 8.3 after COVID-19 (P=0.0029). When compared with the same period in 2019, there was a 36.4% reduction in stroke admissions. There was no difference in admissions for severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score >8), intraparenchymal hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS: The onset of COVID-19 was correlated with a reduction in admissions for transient, mild, and moderate strokes. Given the need to prevent the worsening of symptoms and the occurrence of medical complications in these groups, a reorganization of the stroke-care networks is necessary to reduce collateral damage caused by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Ischemic Attack, Transient/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Incidence , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Ischemic Attack, Transient/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Health Care , Reperfusion , Stroke/therapy , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy
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