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3.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0276420, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079767

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to describe how video laryngoscopy is used outside the operating room within the hospital setting. Specifically, we aimed to summarise the evidence for the use of video laryngoscopy outside the operating room, and detail how it appears in current clinical practice guidelines. A literature search was conducted across two databases (MEDLINE and Embase), and all articles underwent screening for relevance to our aims and pre-determined exclusion criteria. Our results include 14 clinical practice guidelines, 12 interventional studies, 38 observational studies. Our results show that video laryngoscopy is likely to improve glottic view and decrease the incidence of oesophageal intubations; however, it remains unclear as to how this contributes to first-pass success, overall intubation success and clinical outcomes such as mortality outside the operating room. Furthermore, our results indicate that the appearance of video laryngoscopy in clinical practice guidelines has increased in recent years, and particularly through the COVID-19 pandemic. Current COVID-19 airway management guidelines unanimously introduce video laryngoscopy as a first-line (rather than rescue) device.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laryngoscopes , Humans , Laryngoscopy/methods , Operating Rooms , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Video Recording
4.
Kaohsiung J Med Sci ; 38(8): 796-803, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2034917

ABSTRACT

Video laryngoscopy is often selected to assist nasotracheal intubation in allowing better laryngeal visualization, although there is no comparative study evaluating the effectiveness between auxiliary techniques by using Magill forceps and inflated cuff in GlideScope video laryngoscopy for nasotracheal intubation. Fifty-one of 100 patients in a Magill forceps group and 47 of 100 patients in a cuff inflation group were included in the final analysis in this randomized, single-blind, parallel, clinical trial study. Induction agents were routinely administered according to body weight, while intubation time spent, attempts, and related side effects were recorded. Compared to the Magill forceps group, the cuff inflation technique shortened the total intubation time (70.0 ± 24.5 s vs. 87.0 ± 25.0 s, p = 0.001) and the time of advancing the nasotracheal tube from oropharyngeal space into the trachea (25.9 ± 16.4 s vs. 42.3 ± 21.2 s, p < 0.001). However, the number of intubation attempts was not significantly different between groups. During tube advancement, the tube was rotated to accommodate the glottis and trachea more frequently in the cuff inflation group (p = 0.009), but the blade of the laryngoscope shifted and was adjusted to the proper position more frequently in the Magill forceps group (p < 0.001). In the Magill forceps group, the tube cuff might be clipped incidentally and the intubator might shift their gaze away from the screen during intubation, although there was no significant difference in intubation-related side effects between groups. Unlike the conventional approach, nasotracheal intubation with the GlideScope® video laryngoscope using the auxiliary technique of cuff inflation could be more suited than using Magill forceps.


Subject(s)
Laryngoscopes , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopy/methods , Single-Blind Method , Surgical Instruments
5.
Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi ; 25(8): 622-626, 2022 Aug 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2024389

ABSTRACT

The rapid development and promotion of minimally invasive thoracic surgery represented by video-assisted thoracoscopy surgery has gradually replaced traditional thoracic surgery technique as the primary choice for the treatment of pulmonary nodules, including early lung cancer. With the clinical application of double-lumen bronchial catheters, the realization of one-lung ventilation technology not only provides a solid anesthesia foundation for the popularization of minimally invasive thoracic surgery, but also provides a guarantee for the rapid and smooth implementation of the operation. However, compared with single-lumen bronchial catheters, the diameter of the double-lumen bronchial catheter is thicker, and the tube body is hard and difficult to shape, which brings inconvenience to anesthesia intubation. The bronchial structure is different, and the incidence of dislocation during anesthesia intubation is also high. With the gradual clinical use of video double-lumen tube (VDLT), it has become a hot spot in thoracic surgery in recent years. This article reviews the application and research progress of VDLT in thoracic surgery.
.


Subject(s)
Lung Neoplasms , One-Lung Ventilation , Thoracic Surgery , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , One-Lung Ventilation/methods , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods
6.
Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 60(9): 1228-1233, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2003899

ABSTRACT

Cervicofacial infection (CFI) is a frequently encountered presentation to Oral and Maxillofacial Departments (OMFS). The United Kingdom has recently seen cessation of all routine community dental treatment due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and consequently an initial modification of treatment received in secondary care. Subsequent airway difficulties and the need for level 2 High Dependency Unit (HDU) or level 3 Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a concern to surgeons and anaesthetists alike. The availability of skilled staff and appropriate facilities can be variable. It is imperative to understand the resource implications of CFI with respect to airway management and critical care utilisation. Adequate provision is fundamental for optimal care. A national, multicentre, trainee-led audit was carried out across 17 hospitals in the UK from May to September 2017. Information recorded included demographic features, presentation, airway management, medical and surgical treatment, and steroid administration. One thousand and two presentations (1002) were recorded. Forty-five percent were female, with a mean (range) age of 37.5 years (0-94). Regarding surgical airway management, 63.4% had a standard intubation (oral 42%, nasal 21.4%). Awake fibreoptic intubation (AFOI) was performed in 28% and surgical airway required in 0.9%. Impending airway compromise at the time of presentation was 1.7%. Following surgical incision and drainage, 96.1% of patients returned to a general ward, 2.7% to Level 3, and 1.1% to Level 2 care. The return to theatre was 2.8%, and 0.7% required reintubation. There was an association between corticosteroid administration and duration of intubation. Those who received steroids were more likely to remain intubated postoperatively (p = 0.006), require a higher level of postoperative care (p < 0.001), and require a return to theatre (p = 0.019). Postoperatively, patients who received steroids were less likely to be extubated at the close of the procedure. Intubated patients who received multiple steroid doses postoperatively were extubated with less frequency those that received a single dose. To our knowledge, this dataset is the largest ever recorded for CFI. Our results showed a high requirement for advanced airway management in this cohort. The requirement for surgical airway was low, but the significance of this situation should not be underestimated. The relatively frequent need for care at levels 2 or 3 within this cohort also placed a significant demand on already overburdened resources. Knowledge of care requirements for these patients will inform resource planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Infant, Newborn , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Male , Airway Management , Critical Care , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use
7.
Br J Anaesth ; 129(4): 624-634, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1926236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Using a Macintosh-style videolaryngoscope as a first-intention device for tracheal intubation of unselected patients in the operating room has not often been studied. We hypothesised that using a Macintosh-style videolaryngoscope as a first-intention device is associated with an increased proportion of easy tracheal intubation. METHODS: In a quality improvement project for airway management aimed at implementing a Macintosh-style videolaryngoscope as a first-intention device, we included all consecutive tracheal intubations in adults from March, 2017 to September, 2020 in two French teaching hospitals. We divided the cohort into three temporal cohorts: the pre-intervention, implementation, and post-intervention periods. The primary outcome was the proportion of easy airway management. The secondary outcomes were the rescue technique, Cormack-Lehane III or IV view, and operator-reported difficulty of intubation. Data from one hospital compliant with the quality improvement project were compared with data from a non-compliant hospital. RESULTS: A total of 26 692 tracheal intubations were performed. Among 11 938 intubations included in the compliant hospital, 5487 were included in the pre-intervention, 1845 in the implementation, and 4606 in the post-intervention periods. In comparison to the pre-intervention period, the proportions of easy tracheal intubation increased from 94.3% (5177 of 5487) to 98.7% (4547 of 4606)) in the post-intervention period (+4.4% [95% confidence interval 3.7-5.1%], P<0.001). In comparison to the pre-intervention period, all secondary outcome proportions were significantly lower in the post-intervention period. No significant changes were noted in the non-compliant hospital between the pre- and post-intervention periods. CONCLUSIONS: Using a Macintosh-style videolaryngoscope as a first-intention device for tracheal intubation in the operating room was associated with a significant increase in the proportion of easy tracheal intubation, compared with use of the standard Macintosh laryngoscope.


Subject(s)
Laryngoscopes , Adult , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Intention , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopy/methods
8.
Curr Med Res Opin ; 38(9): 1509-1514, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1908462

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The method for predicting the risk of intubation in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is yet to be standardized. This study aimed to introduce a new disease prognosis scoring model that may predict the intubation risk based on the symptoms, signs, and laboratory tests of patients hospitalized with the diagnosis of COVID-19. METHOD: This cross-sectional retrospective study analyzed the intubation status of 733 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 diagnosis between March and December 2020 at Ondokuz Mayis University Faculty of Medicine, Turkey, based on 33 variables. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to select the variables that significantly affect intubation, which constitute the risk factors. The Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detection algorithm, one of the data mining methods, was used to determine the threshold values of the important variables for intubation classification. RESULTS: The following variables found were mostly associated with intubation: C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, age, lymphocyte count, and malignancy. The logistic function based on these variables correctly predicted 81.13% of intubated (sensitivity), 99.52% of nonintubated (specificity), and 96.86% of both intubated and nonintubated (accurate classification rate) patients. The scoring model revealed the following risk statuses for the intubated patients: very high risk, 75.47%; moderate risk, 20.75%; and very low risk, 3.77%. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of certain variables measured at admission, the OTO-COVID-19 scoring model may help clinicians identify patients at the risk of intubation and subsequently provide a prompt and effective treatment at the earliest.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
JAMA ; 327(21): 2104-2113, 2022 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1898487

ABSTRACT

Importance: The efficacy and safety of prone positioning is unclear in nonintubated patients with acute hypoxemia and COVID-19. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and adverse events of prone positioning in nonintubated adult patients with acute hypoxemia and COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: Pragmatic, unblinded randomized clinical trial conducted at 21 hospitals in Canada, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and the US. Eligible adult patients with COVID-19 were not intubated and required oxygen (≥40%) or noninvasive ventilation. A total of 400 patients were enrolled between May 19, 2020, and May 18, 2021, and final follow-up was completed in July 2021. Intervention: Patients were randomized to awake prone positioning (n = 205) or usual care without prone positioning (control; n = 195). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was endotracheal intubation within 30 days of randomization. The secondary outcomes included mortality at 60 days, days free from invasive mechanical ventilation or noninvasive ventilation at 30 days, days free from the intensive care unit or hospital at 60 days, adverse events, and serious adverse events. Results: Among the 400 patients who were randomized (mean age, 57.6 years [SD, 12.83 years]; 117 [29.3%] were women), all (100%) completed the trial. In the first 4 days after randomization, the median duration of prone positioning was 4.8 h/d (IQR, 1.8 to 8.0 h/d) in the awake prone positioning group vs 0 h/d (IQR, 0 to 0 h/d) in the control group. By day 30, 70 of 205 patients (34.1%) in the prone positioning group were intubated vs 79 of 195 patients (40.5%) in the control group (hazard ratio, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.59 to 1.12], P = .20; absolute difference, -6.37% [95% CI, -15.83% to 3.10%]). Prone positioning did not significantly reduce mortality at 60 days (hazard ratio, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.62 to 1.40], P = .54; absolute difference, -1.15% [95% CI, -9.40% to 7.10%]) and had no significant effect on days free from invasive mechanical ventilation or noninvasive ventilation at 30 days or on days free from the intensive care unit or hospital at 60 days. There were no serious adverse events in either group. In the awake prone positioning group, 21 patients (10%) experienced adverse events and the most frequently reported were musculoskeletal pain or discomfort from prone positioning (13 of 205 patients [6.34%]) and desaturation (2 of 205 patients [0.98%]). There were no reported adverse events in the control group. Conclusions and Relevance: In patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure from COVID-19, prone positioning, compared with usual care without prone positioning, did not significantly reduce endotracheal intubation at 30 days. However, the effect size for the primary study outcome was imprecise and does not exclude a clinically important benefit. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04350723.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intubation, Intratracheal , Prone Position , Respiratory Insufficiency , Wakefulness , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy
13.
N Engl J Med ; 386(17): 1627-1637, 2022 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815679

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neonatal endotracheal intubation often involves more than one attempt, and oxygen desaturation is common. It is unclear whether nasal high-flow therapy, which extends the time to desaturation during elective intubation in children and adults receiving general anesthesia, can improve the likelihood of successful neonatal intubation on the first attempt. METHODS: We performed a randomized, controlled trial to compare nasal high-flow therapy with standard care (no nasal high-flow therapy or supplemental oxygen) in neonates undergoing oral endotracheal intubation at two Australian tertiary neonatal intensive care units. Randomization of intubations to the high-flow group or the standard-care group was stratified according to trial center, the use of premedication for intubation (yes or no), and postmenstrual age of the infant (≤28 or >28 weeks). The primary outcome was successful intubation on the first attempt without physiological instability (defined as an absolute decrease in the peripheral oxygen saturation of >20% from the preintubation baseline level or bradycardia with a heart rate of <100 beats per minute) in the infant. RESULTS: The primary intention-to-treat analysis included the outcomes of 251 intubations in 202 infants; 124 intubations were assigned to the high-flow group and 127 to the standard-care group. The infants had a median postmenstrual age of 27.9 weeks and a median weight of 920 g at the time of intubation. A successful intubation on the first attempt without physiological instability was achieved in 62 of 124 intubations (50.0%) in the high-flow group and in 40 of 127 intubations (31.5%) in the standard-care group (adjusted risk difference, 17.6 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.0 to 29.2), for a number needed to treat of 6 (95% CI, 4 to 17) for 1 infant to benefit. Successful intubation on the first attempt regardless of physiological stability was accomplished in 68.5% of the intubations in the high-flow group and in 54.3% of the intubations in the standard-care group (adjusted risk difference, 15.8 percentage points; 95% CI, 4.3 to 27.3). CONCLUSIONS: Among infants undergoing endotracheal intubation at two Australian tertiary neonatal intensive care units, nasal high-flow therapy during the procedure improved the likelihood of successful intubation on the first attempt without physiological instability in the infant. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN12618001498280.).


Subject(s)
Intubation, Intratracheal , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Australia , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Oxygen/analysis , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods
14.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 104(9): 700-702, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808508

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Management of the airway in the perioperative period for patients requiring major head and neck ablative surgery has commonly included the performance of elective surgical tracheostomy. This has been standard practice in most maxillofacial units across the UK, including ours. However, the COVID-19 pandemic and emerging guidelines on aerosol-generating procedures required us to revisit the need for a perioperative tracheostomy. METHODS: We present our series of 29 consecutive cases, cared for during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, that were managed either using surgical tracheostomy or overnight tracheal intubation. RESULTS: Out of 29 patients 3 received a surgical tracheostomy. The average duration of tracheostomy use was 8 days. Twenty patients were managed using a period of overnight tracheal intubation. Average duration of tracheal intubation was 1.2 days, with an average intensive care unit stay of 1.7 days. The average duration of hospital stay was 15.8 days for patients managed with overnight tracheal intubation and 30.1 days for patients who received a surgical tracheostomy. The return to theatre rate was 13.8% for reasons including flap failure and neck space infection. There were no airway issues reported in this series of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that overnight tracheal intubation can be a safe alternative to surgical tracheostomy in the majority of cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tracheostomy , Humans , Tracheostomy/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods
15.
Eur J Anaesthesiol ; 39(5): 463-472, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806662

ABSTRACT

Tracheal intubation is among the most commonly performed and high-risk procedures in critical care. Indeed, 45% of patients undergoing intubation experience at least one major peri-intubation adverse event, with cardiovascular instability being the most common event reported in 43%, followed by severe hypoxemia in 9% and cardiac arrest in 3% of cases. These peri-intubation adverse events may expose patients to a higher risk of 28-day mortality, and they are more frequently observed with an increasing number of attempts to secure the airway. The higher risk of peri-intubation complications in critically ill patients, compared with the anaesthesia setting, is the consequence of their deranged physiology (e.g. underlying respiratory failure, shock and/or acidosis) and, in this regard, airway management in critical care has been defined as "physiologically difficult". In recent years, several randomised studies have investigated the most effective preoxy-genation strategies, and evidence for the use of positive pressure ventilation in moderate-to-severe hypoxemic patients is established. On the other hand, evidence on interventions to mitigate haemodynamic collapse after intubation has been elusive. Airway management in COVID-19 patients is even more challenging because of the additional risk of infection for healthcare workers, which has influenced clinical choices in this patient group. The aim of this review is to provide an update of the evidence for intubation in critically ill patients with a focus on understanding peri-intubation risks and evaluating interventions to prevent or mitigate adverse events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Insufficiency , Airway Management/adverse effects , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods
17.
Am J Emerg Med ; 53: 122-126, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638161

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is still the gold standard of airway management, but in cases of sudden cardiac arrest in patients with suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection, ETI is associated with risks for both the patient and the medical personnel. We hypothesized that the Vie Scope® is more useful for endotracheal intubation of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cardiac arrest patients than the conventional laryngoscope with Macintosh blade when operators are wearing personal protective equipment (PPE). METHODS: Study was designed as a prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial performed by Emergency Medical Services in Poland. Patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis who needed cardiopulmonary resuscitation in prehospital setting were included. Patients under 18 years old or with criteria predictive of impossible intubation under direct laryngoscopy, were excluded. Patients were randomly allocated 1:1 to Vie Scope® versus direct laryngoscopy with a Macintosh blade. Study groups were compared on success of intubation attempts, time to intubation, glottis visualization and number of optimization maneuvers. RESULTS: We enrolled 90 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients, aged 43-92 years. Compared to the VieScope® laryngoscope, use of the Macintosh laryngoscope required longer times for tracheal intubation with an estimated mean difference of -48 s (95%CI confidence interval [CI], -60.23, -35.77; p < 0.001). Moreover VieScope® improved first attempt success rate, 93.3% vs. 51.1% respectively (odds ratio [OR] = 13.39; 95%CI: 3.62, 49.58; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The use of the Vie Scope® laryngoscope in OHCA patients improved the first attempt success rate, and reduced intubation time compared to Macintosh laryngoscope in paramedics wearing PPE for against aerosol generating procedures. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials registration number NCT04365608.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Intubation, Intratracheal/instrumentation , Laryngoscopes/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Airway Management/instrumentation , Airway Management/methods , Airway Management/statistics & numerical data , Allied Health Personnel/standards , Female , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Laryngoscopes/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Resuscitation/instrumentation , Resuscitation/methods , Resuscitation/statistics & numerical data
18.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 21(1): 288, 2021 11 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528675

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: VieScope is a new type of laryngoscope, with a straight, transparent and illuminated blade, allowing for direct line of sight towards the larynx. In addition, VieScope is disposed of after single patient use, which can avoid cross-contaminations of contagious material. This has gained importance especially when treating patients with highly contagious infectious diseases, such as during the SARS-CoV2 pandemic. In this context, VieScope has not been evaluated yet in a clinical study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study compared intubation with VieScope to video-laryngoscopy (GlideScope) in normal and difficult airway in a standardized airway manikin in a randomized controlled simulation trial. Thirty-five medical specialists were asked to perform endotracheal intubation in full personal protective equipment (PPE). Primary endpoint was correct tube position. First-pass rate (i.e., success rate at the first attempt), time until intubation and time until first correct ventilation were registered as secondary endpoints. RESULTS: For correct tracheal tube placement, there was no significant difference between VieScope and GlideScope in normal and difficult airway conditions. VieScope had over 91% fist-pass success rate in normal airway setting. VieScope had a comparable success rate to GlideScope in difficult airway, but had a significantly longer time until intubation and time until ventilation. CONCLUSION: VieScope and GlideScope had high success rates in normal as well as in difficult airway. There was no unrecognized esophageal intubation in either group. Overall time for intubation was longer in the VieScope group, though in an acceptable range given in literature. Results from this simulation study suggest that VieScope may be an acceptable alternative for tracheal intubation in full PPE. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered at the German Clinical Trials Register www.drks.de (Registration date: 09/11/2020; TrialID: DRKS00023406 ).


Subject(s)
Airway Management/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopy/methods , Personal Protective Equipment , Adult , Airway Management/instrumentation , Disposable Equipment , Equipment Design , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Intubation, Intratracheal/instrumentation , Laryngoscopy/instrumentation , Male , Manikins , Middle Aged , Time Factors , Video Recording
19.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260140, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526692

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Early endotracheal intubation improves neurological outcomes in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, although cardiopulmonary resuscitation is initially carried out by personnel with limited experience in a significant proportion of cases. Videolaryngoscopes might decrease the number of attempts and time needed, especially among novices. We sought to compare videolaryngoscopes with direct laryngoscopes in simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation scenarios. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four medical students were recruited to serve as novice users. Following brief, standardized training, students executed endotracheal intubation with the King Vision®, Macintosh and VividTrac® laryngoscopes, on a cardiopulmonary resuscitation trainer in normal and difficult airway scenarios. We evaluated the time to and proportion of successful intubation, the best view of the glottis, esophageal intubation, dental trauma and user satisfaction. RESULTS: In the normal airway scenario, significantly shorter intubation times were achieved using the King Vision® than the Macintosh laryngoscope. In the difficult airway scenario, we found that the VividTrac® was superior to the King Vision® and Macintosh laryngoscopes in the laryngoscopy time. In both scenarios, we noted no difference in the first-attempt success rate, but the best view of the glottis and dental trauma, esophageal intubation and bougie use were more frequent with the Macintosh laryngoscope than with the videolaryngoscopes. The shortest tube insertion times were achieved using the King Vision® in both scenarios. CONCLUSION: All providers achieved successful intubation within three attempts, but we found no device superior in any of our scenarios regarding the first-attempt success rate. The King Vision® was superior to the Macintosh laryngoscope in the intubation time in the normal airway scenario and noninferior in the difficult airway scenario for novice users. We noted significantly less esophageal intubation using the videolaryngoscopes than using the Macintosh laryngoscope in both scenarios. Based on our results, the KingVision® might be recommended over the VividTrac® and Macintosh laryngoscopes for further evaluation.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Laryngoscopy/methods , Adult , Female , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopes , Male , Reference Standards , Respiratory Physiological Phenomena , Respiratory System/anatomy & histology , Students, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
20.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(4): 1665-1674, 2021 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526879

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a disease with a high rate of progression to critical illness. However, the predictors of mortality in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) are not yet well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with ICU mortality in our hospital. Materials and methods: In this single-centered retrospective study, we enrolled 86 critically ill adult patients with COVID-19 admitted to ICU of Dokuz Eylül University Hospital (Izmir, Turkey) between 18 March 2020 and 31 October 2020. Data on demographic information, preexisting comorbidities, treatments, the laboratory findings at ICU admission, and clinical outcomes were collected. The chest computerized tomography (CT) of the patients were evaluated specifically for COVID-19 and CT score was calculated. Data of the survivors and nonsurvivors were compared with survival analysis to identify risk factors of mortality in the ICU. Results: The mean age of the patients was 71.1 ± 14.1 years. The patients were predominantly male. The most common comorbidity in patients was hypertension. ICU mortality was 62.8%. Being over 60 years old, CT score > 15, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score ≥ 15, having dementia, treatment without favipiravir, base excess in blood gas analysis ≤ ­2.0, WBC > 10,000/mm3, D-dimer > 1.6 µg/mL, troponin > 24 ng/L, Na ≥ 145 mmol/L were considered to link with ICU mortality according to Kaplan­Meier curves (log-rank test, p < 0.05). The APACHE II score (HR: 1.055, 95% CI: 1.021­1.090) and chest CT score (HR: 2.411, 95% CI:1.193­4.875) were associated with ICU mortality in the cox proportional-hazard regression model adjusted for age, dementia, favipiravir treatment and troponin. Howewer, no difference was found between survivors and nonsurvivors in terms of intubation timing. Conclusions: COVID-19 patients have a high ICU admission and mortality rate. Studies in the ICU are also crucial in this respect. In our study, we investigated the ICU mortality risk factors of COVID-19 patients. We determined a predictive mortality model consisting of APACHE II score and chest CT score. It was thought that this feasible and practical model would assist in making clinical decisions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Care/methods , Hospital Mortality , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
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