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1.
PLoS One ; 18(1): e0279556, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36701403

ABSTRACT

The power harnessed by cattle traction was undeniably a valuable asset to Neolithic communities. However, data are still lacking on the timing, purposes, and intensity of exploitation of draught animals. This paper sheds new light on a region of Europe-Neolithic Ireland-for which our knowledge is particularly restricted as evidence from both Ireland and Britain in this period has been so far patchy and inconclusive. Using a suite of methods and refined criteria for traction identification, we present new and robust data on a large faunal assemblage from Kilshane, Co. Dublin that strongly support cattle traction in the middle 4th millennium BC in Ireland. Bone pathology data combined with osteometric analysis highlight specialised husbandry practices, producing large males, possibly oxen, for the purpose of cattle traction. This new technology has important implications for early agriculture in the region since it provides a key support for more extensive land management practices as well as for megalithic construction, which increased considerably in scale during this period. We argue that access to draught animals and the exploitation of associated resources were at the heart of wider changes that took place in Neolithic Ireland in the second half of the 4th millennium BC.


Subject(s)
Agriculture , Traction , Male , Animals , Cattle , History, Ancient , Ireland , Europe , Bone and Bones , Archaeology
2.
Ann Fam Med ; (20 Suppl 1)2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36701759

ABSTRACT

Context: People are experts in their own health and need to be involved in health-related decisions, including decisions about what issues should be researched. Underserved communities, such as refugees and migrants, are often excluded from having a voice in relation to their priorities for health research. To avoid tokenistic participation, it is important to develop and test innovative methodologies that are culturally attuned and that can offer 'whole person' (affective, creative and cognitive) engagement. The Participatory Irish World Music Café, first developed in the context of the Irish Refugee Protection Programme in 2015, uses music and singing to develop inclusive, social and creative spaces to support social integration. It has been adapted during COVID-19 as an on-line café. While the café has sustained a strong community presence for five years, its potential adaptation and use to support research health prioritisation processes is unknown. Objective: Explore the use of an on-line, participatory Irish World Music Café to generate research priorities about migrant health in Ireland. Study Design: Participatory health research study co-designed with community partners, using a qualitative ethnographic and arts-based framework. Data from six 1.5 hour on-line cafes includes interviews, focus groups and arts-based documentation generated during the cafes. Analysis follows principles of thematic analysis. Setting or Dataset: Community-based participatory study in Ireland Population studied: Refugees, migrants, primary care providers, national health service planners, artists and academics working in the field of migrant health (n=25) Intervention/Instrument (for interventional studies): n/a Outcome Measures: n/a. Results: Analysis is underway and will describe participants' shared and differential experiences of (i) the research prioritisation sessions with particular attention to their experience of using music and other artistic practices (ii) cultural attunement and whole person engagement and (iii) generating identified research priorities. Conclusions: Findings will inform the evidence base about music as an arts-based method to support a new, inclusive participatory arts-based paradigm for migrants' involvement in research prioritisation. The work will be disseminated in Ireland and in the 53 Member States of the WHO Euro region.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , Humans , Ireland , Qualitative Research , State Medicine , Community-Based Participatory Research , Primary Health Care
3.
Rev. psicol. deport ; 31(3): 134-148, Oct 16, 2022. ilus, tab
Article in English | IBECS | ID: ibc-214727

ABSTRACT

The administration faces a hurdle in curriculum building while anticipating the future needs of the pupils. The industrialized nations have the proper system for curriculum development required for students' sustainable learning. There is a lack of emphasis on curriculum development in sports and psychology. This study examines the sports and psychology curriculum development and reform processes in Singapore, Ireland, Finland, Turkey and Hong Kong. This research is based on secondary data and makes use of document analysis. The findings indicate that countries, including Turkey, should prioritize the development of sports and psychological curricula for the optimal development and education of pupils. The study is based on a novel concept that examines the considerable knowledge gap regarding the creation and reform of sports and psychology curricula. Theoretically, this research is very significant because it has explored the sports and psychology curriculum development process and reforms. This research has addressed the practical challenges of the curriculum creation process and changes in Singapore, Ireland, Turkey, Finland, and Hong Kong, making it valuable from a practical standpoint. Future scholarly works that wish to make a substantial contribution to the body of literature are encouraged to follow the future directions advised by the research.(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Teaching , Curriculum , Students , Educational Measurement , Education , Psychology , Psychology, Sports , Sports Medicine , Turkey , Singapore , Ireland , Finland , Hong Kong
5.
Nutrients ; 15(2)2023 Jan 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36678183

ABSTRACT

The dietary role of meat is under scrutiny for health and environmental reasons, yet a growing body of evidence proposes that advice to limit red meat consumption is unnecessarily restrictive. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of 'fresh beef and lamb' in the diet of the population (5-90 years) in Ireland and its association with markers of nutrition and health status. Analyses are based on data from three nationally representative dietary surveys in the Republic of Ireland. Dietary intake data were estimated using food records, and nutrient intakes were estimated based on UK and Irish food composition tables. Biochemical samples were collected and analysed using standard procedures. 'Fresh beef and lamb' (defined as beef/lamb that had not undergone any preserving process other than chilling/freezing/quick-freezing) was consumed by 68-84% of the population and intakes ranged from 19 to 43 g/d across age groups. It made important contributions to intakes of protein, monounsaturated fat, vitamins D, B12, niacin, iron and zinc while also contributing relatively small proportions of total fat, saturated fat and salt. Higher consumption of 'fresh beef and lamb' was associated with higher intakes of protein, niacin, vitamins B6, B12, zinc and potassium (but also total fat) and lower intakes of carbohydrate and total sugars (but also dietary fibre). In adults, older adults and WCBA, higher consumption of 'fresh beef and lamb' was not associated with increased risk factors of cardio-metabolic diseases nor was it associated with better or poorer nutritional status for vitamins D, B12 or iron. This study adds to the evidence base on the contribution of 'fresh beef and lamb' in the diet and may be useful to policymakers updating guidance for healthy diets from sustainable food systems.


Subject(s)
Niacin , Red Meat , Animals , Cattle , Sheep , Nutritional Status , Ireland , Eating , Diet , Vitamins , Zinc , Iron , Nutrition Surveys , Dietary Fats , Energy Intake , Feeding Behavior
7.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 140, 2023 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36670399

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ireland has one of the lowest BF rates in the world. This study investigates the association between breastfeeding and infant health in Ireland. METHODS: A cross-sectional, secondary analysis of data collected from Growing Up in Ireland (GUI): the National Longitudinal Study of Children was conducted. The average morbidity for 2212. infants exclusively breastfed for at least 90 days (EBF90days) was compared to data for 3987 infants in the non-breastfed (Non-BF) group. Data were weighted using entropy balancing to ensure the comparability of groups. Sensitivity analyses considered alternative definitions of the breastfeeding group. RESULTS: Infants who were EBF90days were significantly less likely to be admitted to hospital (CI: - 0.06 to - 0.03), spent less nights in hospital (CI: - 0.37 to - 0.11), and were less likely to develop respiratory diseases including asthma (CI: - 0.03 to - 0.01), chest infections (CI: - 0.12 to - 0.08), snuffles/common colds (CI: - 0.07 to - 0.02), ear infections (CI: - 0.08 to - 0.04), eczema (CI: - 0.08 to - 0.04), skin problems (CI: - 0.04 to - 0.00), wheezing or asthma (CI: - 0.06 to - 0.03), vomiting (CI: - 0.03 to - 0.00), and colic (CI: - 0.04 to - 0.01). Further outcomes such as current health of the infant at time of interview (CI: - 0.04 to - 0.00), feeding problems (CI: - 0.04 to - 0.02) and sleeping problems (CI: - 0.02 to - 0.00) indicated a protective effect of EBF90days versus Non-BF. However, these infants were also more likely to fail to gain weight (CI: 0.01 to 0.02) and were at a slightly higher risk of developing nappy rash (CI: 0.00 to 0.02). CONCLUSION: Exclusive breastfeeding for 90+ days is associated with protection against childhood morbidity. Given the protective effect of breastfeeding on adverse health effects in infants, policy makers should prioritise policies that support, promote and protect exclusive breastfeeding.


Subject(s)
Asthma , Breast Feeding , Child , Female , Infant , Humans , Incidence , Ireland/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Longitudinal Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies
8.
PLoS One ; 18(1): e0276533, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36662752

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although there is a growing number of scientific publications on financial monitoring, combating money laundering, the shadow economy, and the impact of corruption on economic development, further research needs to determine the stability of the national financial system in dynamics. The dynamic stability of the national financial monitoring system subjects will allow to adequately assess the effectiveness of the existing national financial monitoring system in each country and determine the influential factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The article investigates an approach to identifying the dynamic stability of the national financial monitoring system subjects based on the calculation of the integrated indicator of the country's financial system propensity to ALM, vector autoregression (VAR) model taking into account time lag. The proposed integrated indicator allowed to adequately assess the existing financial monitoring systems of the countries (15 countries of the European Union for 2000-2020: Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Spain). In addition, vector autoregression models (VAR) of the dependence of the country's financial system propensity to ALM on the regressors Government Integrity, Index of economic freedom, Monetary Sector credit to the private sector (% GDP), were built, taking into account time lags in general and for each studied country. RESULTS: According to the modeling results, the national financial monitoring systems in Austria, Belgium, Estonia, Finland, France, Ireland, Netherlands, Slovak Republic, Spain were resistant to money laundering. It is vice versa in Malta, Greece, Cyprus, Portugal, Italy, Latvia. These conclusions are also confirmed based on a binary approach. Such exogenous variables as Government Integrity (with a lag of 2 years) and the Index of economic freedom (taking into account the time delays of the regression reflection under the influence of this regressor for 1 and 2 years) have a statistically significant effect on the country's financial system. CONCLUSION: The general vector autoregression (VAR) model shows that the current value of the country's financial system propensity to ALM by 92.78% is determined by its previous value. With an increase of Government Integrity by 1%, the country's financial system's propensity to ALM will decrease by 0.000616 units with a lag of two years. The nature of the impact made by the Index of economic freedom on the performance feature was specific-when this indicator increases by 1% for a lag delay in one year, the PFSALM value will decrease by 0.001997 units, and for a lag delay of two years it will change the trend and increase by 0.003076 units per unit, respectively.


Subject(s)
Financial Management , Humans , Europe , Greece , Ireland , Italy , Portugal , Spain
9.
PLoS One ; 18(1): e0277696, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36652433

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Physical activity (PA) is an established adjunct therapy for pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients to mitigate PH symptoms and improve quality of life. However, PA engagement within this population remains low. This study investigated PH patients' knowledge of PA, recalled advice, exercise preferences and PA support needs. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 adults (mean age 50 years; SD ±12 years) diagnosed with PH, living in Ireland. Interview scripts were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. RESULTS: Four key themes were identified: Lack of PA knowledge; exercise setting preference; accountability and monitoring; and clinician delivered PA information and guidance. CONCLUSION: This study found that PH clinicians provide suboptimal PA advice, yet patients desired clinician-delivered PA guidance. Home-based exercise was preferred with monitoring and external accountability deemed as important to facilitate sustained engagement. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: PH clinicians are well positioned to play a critical role in assisting and empowering PH patients to engage in PA. Providing training and education to PH clinicians regarding exercise prescription may be beneficial. Further research is needed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of home-based exercise interventions to improve quality of life and physical activity in PH.


Subject(s)
Hypertension, Pulmonary , Quality of Life , Adult , Humans , Middle Aged , Hypertension, Pulmonary/therapy , Exercise , Exercise Therapy , Ireland
10.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 817, 2023 Jan 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36646748

ABSTRACT

We combine forward stratigraphic models with a suite of uncertainty quantification and stochastic model calibration algorithms for the characterization of sedimentary successions in large scale systems. The analysis focuses on the information value provided by a probabilistic approach in the modelling of large-scale sedimentary basins. Stratigraphic forward models (SFMs) require a large number of input parameters usually affected by uncertainty. Thus, model calibration requires considerable time both in terms of human and computational resources, an issue currently limiting the applications of SFMs. Our work tackles this issue through the combination of sensitivity analysis, model reduction techniques and machine learning-based optimization algorithms. We first employ a two-step parameter screening procedure to identify relevant parameters and their assumed probability distributions. After selecting a restricted set of important parameters these are calibrated against available information, i.e., the depth of interpreted stratigraphic surfaces. Because of the large costs associated with SFM simulations, probability distributions of model parameters and outputs are obtained through a data driven reduced complexity model. Our study demonstrates the numerical approaches by considering a portion of the Porcupine Basin, Ireland. Results of the analysis are postprocessed to assess (i) the uncertainty and practical identifiability of model parameters given a set of observations, (ii) spatial distribution of lithologies. We analyse here the occurrences of sand bodies pinching against the continental slope, these systems likely resulting from gravity driven processes in deep sea environment.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Humans , Uncertainty , Probability , Ireland
11.
BMJ Open ; 13(1): e067544, 2023 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36639205

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Planetary health is a transdisciplinary field that explores the relationship between the escalating climate and environmental crises and human health. In light of the human health cost arising from planetary health issues, there is a need to educate future medical practitioners accordingly. This study investigates the factors influencing the integration of planetary health into undergraduate medical education at an Irish university and makes recommendations for future practice. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study design was employed. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with academic staff actively involved in teaching on the undergraduate medical curriculum at Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland University of Medicine and Health Sciences. Both barriers and facilitators to integrating planetary heath into the curriculum were explored. Braun and Clarke's thematic analysis was used to analyse the findings. RESULTS: Barriers to integration include: a lack of curricular space, a perceived lack of awareness among students and educators and a potential lack of knowledge among educators and senior management in relation to these issues. These barriers were tempered by significant facilitators suggesting a shifting paradigm within institutions, innovative approaches to content delivery and an increasing demand from undergraduate medical students. CONCLUSION: This study found a demand from medical educators for the integration of planetary health topics into the medical curriculum. It is suggested that significant adaptation of existing medical curricula is required both in Ireland and further afield, to meet this need. Recommendations based on the barriers and facilitators that emerged during the analysis include: emphasising the clinical relevance of these topics, as suggested by the current evidence base; promoting senior and departmental leadership; and emphasising the potential for improvements in institutional prestige.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Ireland , Curriculum , Qualitative Research
12.
Sci Justice ; 63(1): 1-8, 2023 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36631174

ABSTRACT

Geophysical investigation of a former convent graveyard for conversion to a community centre identified an unrecorded, unmarked burial below a later burial. Archaeological excavation confirmed the presence of skeletonized human remains, considered by police as a possible clandestine burial. Mortuary examination indicated the remains belonged to a mature adult female. To determine whether the deceased could be a recorded missing person, radiocarbon dating was undertaken on a femur and a rib bone. This is not always straightforward, and results showed two possible ages due to intercepts on either side of the nuclear weapons testing spike in atmospheric 14C; however, the later dated burial allowed us to constrain the date of a rib to CE 1959. This study demonstrates that dating a second tissue with a longer turnaround time, such as a femur, can help to constrain which side of the bomb spike is most probable. This paper documents in one work the search, scene and sample and then advances this to resolution by anthropological analysis and radiocarbon dating of human remains.


Subject(s)
Cemeteries , Forensic Anthropology , Adult , Humans , Female , Forensic Anthropology/methods , Ireland , Radiometric Dating , Body Remains , Burial
13.
Sci Justice ; 63(1): 90-108, 2023 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36631187

ABSTRACT

Experiments have been carried out by the UK and Ireland Association of Forensic Science Providers Body Fluid Forum (AFSP BFF) to determine the levels of male DNA, detected during Y-STR analysis, that may be expected on female underwear from non-sexual social interaction and digital penetration, versus non-sexual social interaction only. The data obtained strongly supports the existing assumptions made: whilst low levels of DNA may be inadvertently transferred to the inside surface of a female's underwear during social interaction with a male, there is a low expectation of detecting a matching Y-STR profile to that male, which is suitable for statistical evaluation, unless he is a co-habitant of that female.


Subject(s)
DNA Fingerprinting , Social Interaction , Humans , Male , Female , DNA Fingerprinting/methods , DNA , Chromosomes, Human, Y , Ireland , Microsatellite Repeats
14.
Radiography (Lond) ; 29(1): 247-254, 2023 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36608379

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Placement capacity is a challenge in supporting the clinical education of diagnostic radiography students within the UK at a time where growth in the workforce is required if service delivery needs are to be met. COVID-19 has been one of the catalysts in the growth of innovative and simulated clinical placement models. This survey seeks to understand the current picture of clinical education models and the drivers for it. METHODS: A short online MS Forms survey with mixed question types was distributed to higher education institutions (HEIs) delivering pre-registration diagnostic radiography programmes in the UK and Ireland. Descriptive and thematic analysis of data was undertaken to gain insight into the clinical placement models used. RESULTS: Responses related to 24 programmes from 17 HEIs were collated. Capacity issues, increased student numbers and ability to achieve the learning outcomes were the drivers for the model and arrangement of clinical placements. Clinical practice hours varied widely across programmes as did the proportion of simulation-based education. Respondents felt an increase in the use of placements in modalities and other settings could further increase training capacity. CONCLUSION: Opportunities to further change the clinical placement model have been identified which may alleviate some pressure points on capacity. Guidance around clinical practice hours may facilitate a sustainable approach to workforce training. Innovative placement models will require assessment strategies that align in order that students demonstrate relevant capabilities in a range of settings and value varied learning opportunities. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The collective engagement and innovation of higher education institutions and service providers will be needed to create sustainable quality models of clinical training and assessment to meet diagnostic radiography workforce requirements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Ireland , Radiography , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , COVID-19 Testing
15.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1055082, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36579071
16.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e060502, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36581975

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Individuals with multimorbidity use more health services and take more medicines. This can lead to high out-of-pocket (OOP) healthcare expenditure. This study, therefore, aimed to assess the association between multimorbidity (two or more chronic conditions) and OOP healthcare expenditure in a nationally representative sample of adults aged 50 years or over. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of data collected in 2016 from wave 4 of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing.SettingIreland.ParticipantsCommunity-dwelling adults aged 50 years and over.MethodA generalised linear model with log-link and gamma distributed errors was fitted to assess the association between multimorbidity and OOP healthcare expenditure (including general practitioner, emergency department, outpatients, specialist consultations, hospital admissions, home care and prescription drugs). RESULTS: Overall, 3453 (58.5%) participants had multimorbidity. Among those with any OOP healthcare expenditure, individuals with multimorbidity spent more on average per annum (€806.8 for two conditions, €885.8 for three or more conditions), than individuals with no conditions (€580.3). Pharmacy-dispensed medicine expenditure was the largest component of expenditure. People with multimorbidity on average spent more of their equivalised household income on healthcare (7.1% for two conditions, 9.7% for three or more conditions), than people with no conditions (5.0%). A strong positive association was found between number of conditions and OOP healthcare expenditure (p<0.001) and between having private health insurance and OOP healthcare expenditure (p<0.001). A strong negative association was found between eligibility for free primary/hospital care and heavily subsidised medicines and OOP healthcare expenditure (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that having multimorbidity in Ireland increases OOP healthcare expenditure, which is problematic for those with more conditions who have lower incomes. This highlights the need for this financial burden to be considered when designing healthcare/funding systems to address multimorbidity, so that access to essential healthcare can be maximised for those with greatest need.


Subject(s)
Health Expenditures , Multimorbidity , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Independent Living , Longitudinal Studies , Ireland/epidemiology
17.
PLoS One ; 17(12): e0279635, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36576936

ABSTRACT

AIM: Recruitment and retention remains a concern in obstetrics and gynecology, with consultants having a unique perspective on the daily challenges. We aimed to examine these and examine their solutions to future-proofing the workforce. METHODS: Primary data were collected from consultant obstetrician-gynecologists in the Republic of Ireland. Using a qualitative methodology, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 participants recruited through purposive sampling. Following transcription, deductive content analysis was conducted to identify themes and categories with respect to challenges and solutions in the specialty. RESULTS: Findings revealed four superordinate themes of professional and personal factors, opinions of the specialty and the role of the consultant. Respondents expressed fear about low morale in the specialty, but also threats posed by resource availability and training limitations, in addition to medico-legal and media challenges. Solutions centered around re-evaluating training pathways and implementing improved advocacy and support structures for the specialty and for those working within it. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a unique standpoint from which to explore an international in obstetrics and gynecology. Its solution-based outlook provides the framework to implement changes to protect and retain the current workforce as well as future-proofing recruitment to secure the specialty.


Subject(s)
Gynecology , Obstetrics , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Gynecology/education , Obstetrics/education , Consultants , Ireland , Health Personnel
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(24)2022 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36554841

ABSTRACT

Since Croatia joined the European Union, majority of the studies on Croatian emigrants have predominantly addressed the reasons for migration and their future predictions. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the sense of coherence, health behavior, acculturation, adaptation, perceived health, and quality of life (QoL) in first-generation Croatian migrants living in Austria and Ireland. Our study is the first study that addresses the perceived health and QoL of Croatian migrants since the last emigration wave in 2013. An online survey was conducted in Austria (n = 112) and Ireland (n = 116) using standardized questionnaires. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted for emigrated Croats to identify the predictors of perceived health and QoL. The analyses revealed that the sense of coherence and psychological adaptation were the strongest predictors of perceived health and QoL in Austria and Ireland. Furthermore, in the environmental domain of QoL, a higher education, higher net income, life in Austria rather than Ireland, better health behavior, higher sense of coherence, and better psychological and sociocultural adaptation explained 55.9% of the variance. Health policies and programs should use the salutogenic model to improve the health-related quality of life and psychological adaptation of Croatian migrants.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Transients and Migrants , Cross-Sectional Studies , Croatia , Austria , Ireland , Acculturation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adaptation, Psychological
19.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 994, 2022 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36550410

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The diversity of symptoms associated with Parkinson's and their impact on functioning have led to an increased interest in exploring factors that impact Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). Although the experience of Parkinson's is unique, some symptoms have a greater impact than others, e.g. depression. Moreover, as the risk of Parkinson's increases with age, the financial and public health impact of this condition is likely to increase, particularly within the context of a globally ageing population. In Ireland, research is ongoing in the pursuit of causes and effective treatments for Parkinson's; however, its impact on everyday living, functioning, and HRQoL is largely under-examined. This study aims to describe factors that influence HRQoL for people with Parkinson's (PwP) in one region of Ireland. METHODS: A cross-sectional postal survey was conducted among people living with Parkinson's (n = 208) in one area of Ireland. This survey included socio-demographic questions, Nonmotor Symptoms Questionnaire for Parkinson's disease (NMSQuest), the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), and the Parkinson's disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS, IBM version 25 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, II, USA). RESULTS: Participants reflected a predominantly older population who were married, and lived in their own homes (91%). Participants diagnosed the longest reported poorer HRQoL regarding mobility, activities of daily living, emotional well-being, social support, cognition, communication domains and overall HRQoL. Lower HRQoL correlated with higher depression scores p < 0.001 and participants in the lower HRQoL cohort experienced 2.25 times more non-motor symptoms (NMSs) than participants with higher HRQoL. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis predicted Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15) score, NMS burden, and years since diagnosis to negatively impact HRQoL. Principal component analysis (PCA) also indicated that for the population in this study, components measuring 1) independence/dependence 2) stigma 3) emotional well-being, and 4) pain were central to explaining core aspects of participants' HRQoL. CONCLUSIONS: Findings highlighted the negative impact of longer disease duration, NMS burden, depression, mobility impairments, and perceived dependence on HRQoL for PwP. The positive influence of perceived independence, social engagement along with close supportive relationships were also identified as key components determining HRQoL. Findings emphasised the importance of long-term healthcare commitment to sustaining social and community supports and therapeutic, rehabilitative initiatives to augment HRQoL for PwP.


Subject(s)
Parkinson Disease , Quality of Life , Humans , Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/complications , Activities of Daily Living , Ireland/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Pediatr Surg Int ; 39(1): 50, 2022 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36520301

ABSTRACT

The National Children's Research Centre (NCRC), the single largest paediatric research centre in Ireland, has been in existence for over 50 years and is located on the grounds of the largest children's hospital in Ireland; Children's Health Ireland at Crumlin. Professor Puri was appointed as the Director of the Research in 1989 and became President of the NCRC in 2009, a position he held until 2016. Professor Puri is one of the most cited paediatric surgical researchers in the world. His research work has been cited over 23,500 times in peer-reviewed articles with an h-index of 76 and i10-index of 494. The aim of this review is to analyse the most relevant areas of academic research at the NCRC, Dublin, during the years when Prof. Puri was Director/President of the NCRC. In addition, the relevant factors essential to create a successful paediatric surgical research centre will be discussed. A literature search using PubMed/Medline was carried out using the search terms "Prem Puri" over a 40-year period (1980-2020). Articles were analysed to identify the most significant research areas in the field of paediatric surgical research and the relevant laboratory and clinical findings. In addition, a separate analysis of successful funding and human factors, such as research fellows working at the NCRC, was also carried out. During the period under review, Professor Puri's team published 750 articles in peer-reviewed journals. Three main areas of research were reviewed with a total number of 391 articles: congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) was the topic with the largest number of publications (153), followed by Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) (144) and Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) (94). Eighty research fellows, all paediatric surgeons, from 18 different countries were trained in basic science under the supervision of Professor Puri at the NCRC. Over the last three decades, the NCRC has been one of the most successful centres for paediatric surgical research in the world. The three areas of research with the largest number of publications were identified as CDH, HSCR and VUR. Various factors can explain the success of the NCRC: (a) the constant presence, for over 30 years, of a very successful paediatric surgeon leading the centre, (b) a multicultural laboratory with research fellows from all over the world and (c) grants of more than 15 million raised over the years, which guaranteed a constant flow of resources for laboratory research.


Subject(s)
Translational Science, Biomedical , Child , Humans , Male , Ireland
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