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1.
J Affect Disord ; 300: 76-83, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587426

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Irritability is a transdiagnostic symptom that accompanies both internalizing and externalizing problems. However, there has been a scarcity of research concerning the relationships between irritability and mental health profiles among children and adolescents. AIM: This study aimed to identify latent profiles in children and adolescents using anxiety, depression, oppositionality, and irritability. In addition, the profiles were further examined in their relationships with mental health symptoms. METHOD: The study analyzed data from 1867 children and adolescents aged 6-15 years from the COVID-19 Online-Survey for Children and Adolescents in Japan (J-COSCA). Parent-reported questionnaires were used in this study. RESULTS: A latent profile analysis detected five latent profiles. High oppositionality characterized the first profile ("oppositional": n = 405, 22%). High levels of depression and other less pronounced symptoms characterized the second profile ("depressed": n = 276, 15%). The third profile ("average": n = 602, 33%) presented average symptoms of anxiety, depression and oppositionality and low irritability. The fourth profile ("well-adjusted": n = 235, 13%) presented low values for all the applicable symptoms. The last profile ("comorbid": n = 308, 17%) exhibited high values for all the symptoms and the highest level of irritability of the five profiles. LIMITATION: We analyzed the data from a community sample alone after capturing it using parent-reported questionnaires. CONCLUSION: This study revealed that the five profiles (oppositional, depressed, average, well-adjusted, and comorbid) were identified, and children and adolescents in the comorbid profiles had high irritability as well as high anxiety, depression, and oppositionality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Adolescent , Child , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Irritable Mood , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(10): 727-733, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440682

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of anxiety, depression, and irritability symptoms in children during the COVID-19 outbreak and to investigate the associated factors of these symptoms. This study was conducted with 1071 children aged 6 to 17. Results showed that 49.9% of the participants had anxiety symptoms, 29.5% had depression symptoms, and 51.4% had irritability symptoms. Low age was a potential risk factor for anxiety symptoms. Female sex was a potential risk factor for anxiety and depression symptoms. A COVID-19 death in the family or environment was a potential risk factor for depression and irritability symptoms. Exposure to COVID-19 information on television and on the internet was a potential risk factor for anxiety, depression, and irritability symptoms. In conclusion, this study revealed that the COVID-19 outbreak may have serious effects on the mental health of children, and the study highlighted potential risk factors.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Irritable Mood , Adolescent , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Internet , Life Change Events , Male , Mass Media , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
3.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(11): e14742, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367315

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the impact of COVID-19 home confinement on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms and irritability in children and adolescents with ASD. METHOD: The study participants included 46 drug-naive children aged 4-17 years diagnosed with ASD. Parents of the participants completed the Autism Behaviour Checklist (AuBC) and Affective Reactivity Index (ARI) scales for both normal conditions and COVID-19 home confinement. RESULTS: All subscale scores for AuBC (sensory, relating, body and object use, language, and social and self-help) and ARI scores significantly increased during the COVID-19 home confinement period (P < .05). The participants' irritability and ASD symptoms were significantly worse during the COVID-19 outbreak and home confinement period compared to normal conditions. The variables that predicted irritability were the social and self-help subscales of AuBC. DISCUSSION: These results have alerted us of the importance of focusing on the symptoms such as irritability exhibited by extremely vulnerable populations during disease outbreaks and of the necessity of developing new strategies to avoid such adverse outcomes in similar situations.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Irritable Mood , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Res Dev Disabil ; 116: 104038, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313412

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has generated a global crisis that has affected the emotional health of both the general and the clinical population. METHOD: The present study aimed to analyze the differences between the emotional states of a group of individuals with ASD and a neurotypical group both during and after the COVID-19 confinement. The study also examined the changes in autistic symptoms between a group of individuals with ASD who were confined during the COVID-19 pandemic and another group of individuals with ASD who were studied prior to the COVID-19 pandemic period. RESULTS: Higher levels of aggression, irritability, hyperactivity and impulsivity, lack of attention and anxiety, among other symptoms, were found in individuals with ASD during confinement when compared to healthy controls (p < .05; p < .01). Higher levels of repetitive, restrictive, and stereotyped behaviors were also found in pandemic-era ASD individuals when compared to the group of individuals with ASD who were assessed prior to the pandemic (p < .01). CONCLUSIONS: the confinement is related to an increase in symptomatology and dysfunctional behaviours characteristic of ASD, and therefore it is necessary to implement actions that help to reduce this impact now, as well as in future crisis events.


Subject(s)
Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Autistic Disorder/epidemiology , Humans , Irritable Mood , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(3)2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232621

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to an increased risk of psychiatric symptoms among frontline health care workers (FHCWs). In the current study, a novel "symptomics" approach was employed to examine the association between acute transdiagnostic symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and burnout and work and relationship difficulties in FHCWs at an urban tertiary care hospital in New York City. METHODS: Symptoms of COVID-19-related PTSD (4-item PTSD Checklist-5), MDD (Patient Health Questionnaire-8), GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), burnout (Single-Item Mini-Z Burnout Assessment), and functional difficulties (Brief Inventory of Psychosocial Functioning) were assessed. Relative importance analyses were conducted to identify PTSD, MDD, and GAD symptoms associated with burnout and functional difficulties. RESULTS: The total number of eligible participants included 6,026 presumed FHCWs, of which 3,360 (55.8%) completed the survey and 2,579 (76.8%) of whom endorsed directly treating patients with COVID-19 and provided sufficient responses to our outcome variables for analysis. Feeling tired/having little energy, being easily annoyed or irritable, and feeling nervous, anxious, or on edge were most strongly associated with burnout; feeling tired/having little energy accounted for the greatest amount of explained variance (> 15%). Negative expectations of oneself or the world, trouble concentrating, and feeling easily annoyed or irritable were most strongly associated with work difficulties; negative expectations of oneself or the world accounted for the greatest amount of explained variance (> 9%). Feeling easily annoyed or irritable, negative expectations about oneself or the world, and feeling bad about oneself were most strongly associated with relationship difficulties; feeling easily annoyed or irritable accounted for the greatest amount of explained variance (> 10%). CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study underscore the importance of a transdiagnostic, symptom-based approach when examining associations between acute psychopathology and burnout and functional difficulties in FHCWs. Further work is needed to determine if early interventions aimed at ameliorating specific psychiatric symptoms may help mitigate risk for peri- and posttraumatic burnout and functional difficulties in this population.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/physiopathology , Burnout, Professional/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Depressive Disorder, Major/physiopathology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Irritable Mood/physiology , Personnel, Hospital , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/physiopathology , Adult , Female , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City , Tertiary Care Centers
9.
Indian Pediatr ; 58(2): 126-128, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-984164

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the broader clinical spectrum of COVID-19 in children. METHODS: In this descriptive, prospective study, we included confirmed pediatric patients with COVID-19 who presented to the emergency department of a pediatric tertiary care center from April to July, 2020. All patients were confirmed by the SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test, and we analyzed 24 symptoms and 25 signs. RESULTS: Among the 50 patients with COVID-19, the most common symptoms were fever, excessive cry and dry cough; digestive symptoms were frequently found (24%). The most common signs were pharyngeal erythema and irritability. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should recognize that the clinical spectrum of COVID-19 in children is wider than previously described, often with nonspecific signs and symptoms, and digestive symptoms should raise suspicion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Digestive System Diseases , Symptom Assessment , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , Child , Child, Preschool , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/etiology , Digestive System Diseases/diagnosis , Digestive System Diseases/virology , Female , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/etiology , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Irritable Mood/physiology , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data
10.
Psychiatry Res ; 296: 113692, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989073

ABSTRACT

The current study examined the impact of the lockdown due to the Covid-19 disease on mood state and behaviours of children and adolescents with ADHD. Nine hundred ninety-two parents of children and adolescents with ADHD filled out an anonymous online survey through the ADHD family association website. The survey investigated the degree of severity of six emotional and mood states (sadness, boredom, little enjoyment/interest, irritability, temper tantrums, anxiety) and five disrupted behaviours (verbal and physical aggression, argument, opposition, restlessness) based on their frequency/week (absent; low: 1-2 days/week; moderate: 3-4 days/week; severe: 5-7 days/week) before and during the lockdown. Important fluctuations were found in all dimensions during the lockdown independently by the severity degree. Subjects with previous low severity degree of these behaviors significantly worsened in almost all dimensions during the lockdown. On the contrary, ADHD patients with moderate and severe degree showed important improvement during the lockdown. Little enjoyment/interests and boredom resulted the dimensions more strongly affected by the condition of restriction, overall in children. Children vs. adolescents showed substantially similar trend but the former resulted significantly more vulnerable to emotive changes. The results provided both the individuation of domains affected, and the indirect benefits produced by restriction condition.


Subject(s)
Affective Symptoms/psychology , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Child Behavior Disorders/psychology , Social Isolation , Adolescent , Aggression/psychology , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Boredom , Child , Female , Humans , Irritable Mood , Male , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Child Care Health Dev ; 47(1): 128-135, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-936678

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown is one of the prevalent tools that are used to control the spread of COVID-19 virus in India. Under the circumstances created during lockdown period, children are deprived from the social interaction and companionship; because of which, they are susceptible to psychiatric disorders. Therefore, in this study, efforts were to understand the impacts of lockdown on the mental status of the children of India and their specific causes. STUDY DESIGN: It is a questionnaire-based study. METHODS: A web-based questionnaire was prepared, and 400 parents from four districts of Punjab, India, namely, Ludhiana, Sahibzada Ajit Singh (SAS) Nagar, Sangrur and Ferozepur, were telephonically interviewed. Further, the information collected from the interviews was statistically analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. RESULTS: Findings from this study revealed that 73.15% and 51.25% of the children were having signs of increased irritation and anger, respectively; 18.7% and 17.6% of the parents also mentioned the symptoms of depression and anxiety, respectively, among their children, which were also augmented by the changes in their diet, sleep, weight and more usage of the electronic equipment. Children (~76.3%) persistently urge to go outdoors and play with their friends; therefore, they could lag in social development. Further, observations from Pearson's correlation revealed that during lockdown, children's mental health is significantly related to the area of their house, number of children in the family, qualification of their mother and socio-economic status of their family. CONCLUSIONS: This study made it evident that the mental health of the children residing in Punjab, India, was compromised during the lockdown period induced by the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings of this study may also trigger the international authorities to frame the guidelines of lockdown in the interest of mental health of their native children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Child Behavior/psychology , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology , Anger , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India , Irritable Mood , Male , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
J Acoust Soc Am ; 148(4): 1824, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901218

ABSTRACT

Peru declared a state of emergency on March 16 in order to prevent SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) transmissions; thus, the International Airport was closed and the soundscape of urban zones under the flight tracks have been changed in view of the fact that airplane traffic was suspended. The authors have been conducting noise monitoring since February and because of that sufficient noise data for knowing the soundscape before and during the lockdown were obtained. This article presents a case of aircraft annoyance noise in one of Lima's city districts, which is near the aircraft climbing curve, toward the ocean on departure from Lima.


Subject(s)
Air Travel , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Environmental Exposure/prevention & control , Irritable Mood , Noise, Transportation/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Social Isolation , Urban Health , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Environmental Monitoring , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peru , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Sound Spectrography , Time Factors
14.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14161, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695322

ABSTRACT

There is a sparsity of data regarding the mental health status of dermatologists during COVID-19 pandemic. Evaluate the effects of pandemic on mental health of dermatologists on a large scale and identify risk factors for mental distress. 733 dermatologists were included in this cross-sectional, web-based survey. Mental distress was reported by 77.2% of responders. Considerable percentages of participants experienced stress (73.9%), irritation (33.7%), insomnia (30%), or depression (27.6%), and 78.6% were overwhelmed with the amount of pandemic information they were receiving. Mental distress was significantly associated with practice years, volume of patients seen per week before pandemic, personal protective equipment availability at hospital (P = .001 for each), practice location (continent; P < .001), and participant's assessment that the healthcare system was not equipped for the pandemic (P = .003). Stress was associated with hospital service (P = .003), and depression with being overwhelmed with the amount of pandemic information received (P = .004). In a logistic model, teledermatology use was the most powerful predictor of mental distress (OR, 1.57 [95% CI, 1.07-2.32]). Mental distress was common among dermatologists during this pandemic. Teledermatology use was the most powerful predictor of mental distress. Preventative strategies and psychosocial interventions should be implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatologists/psychology , Mental Health , Occupational Health , Occupational Stress/etiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/psychology , Health Surveys , Humans , Irritable Mood , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/psychology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology
16.
Br J Psychiatry ; 217(3): 475-476, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-268978

ABSTRACT

The evolving COVID-19 pandemic and its likely consequences add to the already substantial psychosocial burden caused by global problems, existential threats and heightened uncertainty, which are increasingly confronting communities worldwide. Here we briefly outline three challenges for clinical psychiatry and research, related to coping with the social epidemiology of negative moods, stress and socially mediated traumatic experiences brought on by these adverse developments.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Coronavirus Infections , Mental Health/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Psychology , Stress, Psychological , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Global Health , Humans , Irritable Mood , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Social Media , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Uncertainty
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