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1.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 10(14): e021046, 2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463078

ABSTRACT

Background Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) in the context of COVID-19 has received considerable attention for its propensity to affect patients of all ages. We aimed to evaluate the effect of age on functional outcome and mortality following an acute ischemic event. Methods and Results A prospectively maintained database from comprehensive stroke centers in Canada and the United States was analyzed for patients with AIS from March 14 to September 30, 2020 who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. The primary outcome was Modified Rankin Scale score at discharge, and the secondary outcome was mortality. Baseline characteristics, laboratory values, imaging, and thrombectomy workflow process times were assessed. Among all 126 patients with COVID-19 who were diagnosed with AIS, the median age was 63 years (range, 27-94). There were 35 (27.8%) patients with AIS in the aged ≤55 years group, 47 (37.3%) in the aged 56 to 70 group, and 44 (34.9%) in the aged >70 group. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and thrombectomy rates were comparable across these groups, (P=0.331 and 0.212, respectively). There was a significantly lower rate of mortality between each group favoring younger age (21.9% versus 45.0% versus 48.8%, P=0.047). After multivariable adjustment for possible confounders, a 1-year increase in age was significantly associated with fewer instances of a favorable outcome of Modified Rankin Scale 0 to 2 (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; 95 CI%, 0.90-0.99; P=0.048) and higher mortality (OR, 1.06; 95 CI%, 1.02-1.10; P=0.007). Conclusions AIS in the context of COVID-19 affects young patients at much greater rates than pre-pandemic controls. Nevertheless, instances of poor functional outcome and mortality are closely tied to increasing age.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Canada , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , United States
2.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(12): 106121, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415617

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is little information regarding the safety of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) in patients with stroke and COVID-19. METHODS: This multicenter study included consecutive stroke patients with and without COVID-19 treated with IV-tPA between February 18, 2019, to December 31, 2020, at 9 centers participating in the CASCADE initiative. Clinical outcomes included modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at hospital discharge, in-hospital mortality, the rate of hemorrhagic transformation. Using Bayesian multiple regression and after adjusting for variables with significant value in univariable analysis, we reported the posterior adjusted odds ratio (OR, with 95% Credible Intervals [CrI]) of the main outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 545 stroke patients, including 101 patients with COVID-19 were evaluated. Patients with COVID-19 had a more severe stroke at admission. In the study cohort, 85 (15.9%) patients had a hemorrhagic transformation, and 72 (13.1%) died in the hospital. After adjustment for confounding variables, discharge mRS score ≥2 (OR: 0.73, 95% CrI: 0.16, 3.05), in-hospital mortality (OR: 2.06, 95% CrI: 0.76, 5.53), and hemorrhagic transformation (OR: 1.514, 95% CrI: 0.66, 3.31) were similar in COVID-19 and non COVID-19 patients. High-sensitivity C reactive protein level was a predictor of hemorrhagic transformation in all cases (OR:1.01, 95%CI: 1.0026, 1.018), including those with COVID-19 (OR:1.024, 95%CI:1.002, 1.054). CONCLUSION: IV-tPA treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke and COVID-19 was not associated with an increased risk of disability, mortality, and hemorrhagic transformation compared to those without COVID-19. IV-tPA should continue to be considered as the standard of care in patients with hyper acute stroke and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Ischemic Stroke/drug therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Disability Evaluation , Europe , Female , Fibrinolytic Agents/adverse effects , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Intracranial Hemorrhages/chemically induced , Iran , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thrombolytic Therapy/adverse effects , Thrombolytic Therapy/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
3.
Cerebrovasc Dis ; 50(2): 185-199, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Posterior circulation stroke is characterized by poor prognosis because its optimal thrombolysis "time window" is always missed. After mechanical thrombectomy (MT), the recanalization rate of posterior circulation obstruction is significantly increased, but prognosis remains poor. To best manage patients, prognostic factors are needed to inform MT triaging after posterior circulation stroke. METHODS: A systematic literature search was done for the period through April 2020. Studies included those with posterior circulation stroke cases that underwent MT. The primary outcome measure in this study was the modified Rankin Scale on day 90. RESULTS: No outcome differences were found in gender, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and coronary artery disease (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.90-1.28; OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.82-1.26; OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 0.94-1.68; and OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.58-1.22, respectively). Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and previous stroke correlated with poorer prognosis (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.48-0.77; OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.50-0.73; and OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55-0.99, respectively). However, hyperlipidemia correlated with better prognosis (OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.04-1.58). CONCLUSION: Our analysis indicates that hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or previous stroke correlate with poorer outcomes. Intriguingly, hyperlipidemia correlates with better prognosis. These factors may help inform triage decisions when considering MT for posterior circulation stroke patients. However, large, multicenter, randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these observations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Thrombectomy/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Recovery of Function , Referral and Consultation/trends , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Thrombectomy/mortality , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Treatment Outcome
4.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(11): 105953, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275544

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose; Chile has been one of the most affected countries by the COVID-19 pandemic, with one of the highest case rates per population. This has affected the epidemiological behaviour of various pathologies. We analyze the impact of the pandemic on the number of admissions due to stroke, its severity and mortality in Santiago, Chile. METHODS: a multicenter observational study based on the records of the 3 hospitals of the South East health service in Santiago, Chile. We recorded the number of patients admitted for ischemic stroke between 01 January 2020 and 30 June 2020. We grouped the cases into two periods, pre-pandemic and pandemic, according to the setting of the state of emergency in Chile. RESULTS: 431 patients were admitted with ischemic stroke during the study period. There was a non-significant decrease in weekly admissions (17 vs 15 patients per week). No differences were observed in the proportion of patients with medical treatment (p = 0.810), IVT (p = 0.638), EVT (p = 0.503) or IVT + EVT (p = 0.501). There was a statistically significant increase in the NIHSS on admission (7.23 vs 8.78, p = 0.009) and mortality (5.2% vs 12.4%, p = 0.012). In a multivariate analysis the NIHSS on admission was associated with the increased mortality (RR 1.11, CI 1.04-1.19, p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: We found an increase in the severity of ischemic stroke on admission and in-hospital mortality during the pandemic period. The main factor to increase in-hospital mortality was the NIHSS on admission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Chile/epidemiology , Disability Evaluation , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
5.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(7): 105805, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171128

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is limited literature on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID -19) complications such as thromboembolism, cardiac complications etc. as possible trigger for stroke. Hence, we aim to evaluate the prevalence and outcomes of COVID-19 related cardiovascular complications and secondary infection and their possibility as potential triggers for the stroke. METHODS: Data from observational studies describing the complications [acute cardiac injury (ACI), cardiac arrhythmias (CA), disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), septic shock, secondary infection] and outcomes of COVID-19 hospitalized patients from December 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020, were extracted following PRISMA guidelines. Adverse outcomes defined as intensive care units, oxygen saturation less than 90%, invasive mechanical ventilation, severe disease, and in-hospital mortality. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were obtained, and forest plots were created using random-effects models. A short review of these complications as triggers of stroke was conducted. RESULTS: 16 studies with 3480 confirmed COVID-19 patients, prevalence of ACI [38%vs5.9%], CA [26%vs5.3%], DIC [4%vs0.74%], septic shock [18%vs0.36%], and infection [30%vs12.5%] was higher among patients with poor outcomes. In meta-analysis, ACI [aOR:9.93(95%CI:3.95-25.00], CA [7.52(3.29-17.18)], DIC [7.36(1.24-43.73)], septic shock [30.12(7.56-120.10)], and infection [10.41(4.47-24.27)] had higher odds of adverse outcomes. Patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage, had complications like pulmonary embolism, venous thromboembolism, DIC, etc. and had poor outcomes CONCLUSION: The complications like acute cardiac injury, cardiac arrhythmias, DIC, septic shock, and secondary infection had poor outcomes. Patients with stroke were having history of these complications. Long term monitoring is required in such patients to prevent stroke and mitigate adverse outcomes.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/mortality , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/diagnosis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/mortality , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Observational Studies as Topic , Prevalence , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/mortality , Venous Thromboembolism/therapy
6.
Cerebrovasc Dis ; 50(3): 326-331, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153755

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Increasing evidence suggests patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may develop thrombosis and thrombosis-related complications. Some previous evidence has suggested COVID-19-associated strokes are more severe with worse outcomes for patients, but further studies are needed to confirm these findings. The aim of this study was to determine the association between COVID-19 and mortality for patients with ischaemic stroke in a large multicentre study. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using electronic medical records of inpatients from 50 healthcare organizations, predominately from the USA. Patients with ischaemic stroke within 30 days of COVID-19 were identified. COVID-19 was determined from diagnosis codes or a positive test result identified with CO-VID-19-specific laboratory codes between January 20, 2020, and October 1, 2020. Historical controls with ischaemic stroke without COVID-19 were identified in the period January 20, 2019, to October 1, 2019. 1:1 propensity score matching was used to balance the cohorts with and without CO-VID-19 on characteristics including age, sex, race and comorbidities. Kaplan-Meier survival curves for all-cause 60-day mortality by COVID-19 status were produced. RESULTS: During the study period, there were 954 inpatients with ischaemic stroke and COVID-19. During the same time period in 2019, there were 48,363 inpatients with ischaemic stroke without COVID-19 (historical controls). Compared to patients with ischaemic stroke without COVID-19, patients with ischaemic stroke and COVID-19 had a lower mean age, had a lower prevalence of white patients, a higher prevalence of black or African American patients and a higher prevalence of hypertension, previous cerebrovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, liver disease, neoplasms, and mental disorders due to known physiological conditions. After propensity score matching, there were 952 cases and 952 historical controls; cases and historical controls were better balanced on all included characteristics (all p > 0.05). After propensity score matching, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed the survival probability was significantly lower in ischaemic stroke patients with COVID-19 (78.3% vs. 91.0%, log-rank test p < 0.0001). The odds of 60-day mortality were significantly higher for patients with ischaemic stroke and COVID-19 compared to the propensity score-matched historical controls (odds ratio: 2.51 [95% confidence interval 1.88-3.34]). DISCUSSION/CONCLUSIONS: Ischaemic stroke patients with COVID-19 had significantly higher 60-day all-cause mortality compared to propensity score-matched historical controls (ischaemic stroke patients without COVID-19).


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Stroke/mortality , Age Factors , Aged , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
7.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 43, 2021 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054807

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with a small but clinically significant risk of stroke, the cause of which is frequently cryptogenic. In a large multinational cohort of consecutive COVID-19 patients with stroke, we evaluated clinical predictors of cryptogenic stroke, short-term functional outcomes and in-hospital mortality among patients according to stroke etiology. METHODS: We explored clinical characteristics and short-term outcomes of consecutively evaluated patients 18 years of age or older with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from 31 hospitals in 4 countries (3/1/20-6/16/20). RESULTS: Of the 14.483 laboratory-confirmed patients with COVID-19, 156 (1.1%) were diagnosed with AIS. Sixty-one (39.4%) were female, 84 (67.2%) white, and 88 (61.5%) were between 60 and 79 years of age. The most frequently reported etiology of AIS was cryptogenic (55/129, 42.6%), which was associated with significantly higher white blood cell count, c-reactive protein, and D-dimer levels than non-cryptogenic AIS patients (p

Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospital Mortality , Ischemic Stroke/virology , Registries , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Computed Tomography Angiography , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/blood , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Stroke , United States/epidemiology
8.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(3): 105552, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is primarily known as a respiratory illness; however, a wide variety of symptoms and complications of the central nervous system (CNS), such as ischemic cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) have been reported. Hereby, we provide a systematic review and a meta-analysis of the literature, investigating the incidence of ischemic CVA and the mortality due to it in the setting of COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our search databases included Google Scholar, MEDLINE via PubMed, and Scopus. We searched the databases up to July 22, 2020. The primary outcome was the incidence of ischemic CVA in COVID-19 cases, while the secondary outcomes were the ratio of mortality in these cases. Standard meta-analysis methods used to measure the pooled incidence and mortality rates of ischemic CVA in COVID-19 cases. RESULTS: After excluding studies with reasons, only 20 articles were eligible to be included in our qualitative synthesis, and 17 studies were evaluated quantitatively in our meta-analysis. Included studies reported a pooled average incidence of 1.7% for ischemic CVA, ranging from 1.3% to 2.3%. Mortality in patients of ischemic CVA to all COVID-19 cases was 0.5%, ranging from 0.4% to 0.6%. The mortality rate of patients with CVA to those who suffered from COVID-19 infection and ischemic CVA simultaneously was 29.2% ranging from 21.6% to 38.2%. Overall, the heterogeneity of the studies was high. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis revealed a pooled incidence of 1.7% for ischemic CVA in the setting of COVID-19 infection, with a mortality rate of 29.2% amongst the COVID-19 patients who are suffering ischemic CVA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Incidence , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Treatment Outcome
9.
Int J Stroke ; 16(4): 429-436, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-968101

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19-related strokes are increasingly being diagnosed across the world. Knowledge about the clinical profile, imaging findings, and outcomes is still evolving. Here we describe the characteristics of a cohort of 62 COVID-19-related stroke patients from 13 hospitals, from Bangalore city, south India. OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical profile, neuroimaging findings, interventions, and outcomes in COVID-19-related stroke patients. METHODS: This is a multicenter retrospective study of all COVID-19-related stroke patients from 13 hospitals from south India; 1st June 2020-31st August 2020. The demographic, clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging data were collected along with treatment administered and outcomes. SARS-CoV-2 infection was confirmed in all cases by RT-PCR testing. The data obtained from the case records were entered in SPSS 25 for statistical analysis. RESULTS: During the three-month period, we had 62 COVID-19-related stroke patients, across 13 centers; 60 (97%) had ischemic strokes, while 2 (3%) had hemorrhagic strokes. The mean age of patients was 55.66 ± 13.20 years, with 34 (77.4%) males. Twenty-six percent (16/62) of patients did not have any conventional risk factors for stroke. Diabetes mellitus was seen in 54.8%, hypertension was present in 61.3%, coronary artery disease in 8%, and atrial fibrillation in 4.8%. Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 12.7 ± 6.44. Stroke severity was moderate (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 5-15) in 27 (61.3%) patients, moderate to severe (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 16-20) in 13 (20.9%) patients and severe (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 21-42) in 11 (17.7%) patients. According to TOAST classification, 48.3% was stroke of undetermined etiology, 36.6% had large artery atherosclerosis, 10% had small vessel occlusion, and 5% had cardioembolic strokes. Three (5%) received intravenous thrombolysis with tenecteplase 0.2 mg/kg and 3 (5%) underwent mechanical thrombectomy, two endovascular and one surgical. Duration of hospital stay was 16.16 ± 6.39 days; 21% (13/62) died in hospital, while 37 (59.7%) had a modified Rankin score of 3-5 at discharge. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores were associated with increased mortality. A comparison to 111 historical controls during the non-COVID period showed a higher proportion of strokes of undetermined etiology, higher mortality, and higher morbidity in COVID-19-related stroke patients. CONCLUSION: COVID-19-related strokes are increasingly being recognized in developing countries, like India. Stroke of undetermined etiology appears to be the most common TOAST subtype of COVID-19-related strokes. COVID-19-related strokes were more severe in nature and resulted in higher mortality and morbidity. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores were associated with increased mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Testing , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Female , Humans , Hypertension/complications , India/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Intracranial Hemorrhages/mortality , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Neuroimaging , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Thrombolytic Therapy , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
10.
Stroke ; 52(1): 31-39, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Acute ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion can be concurrent with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Outcomes after mechanical thrombectomy (MT) for large vessel occlusion in patients with COVID-19 are substantially unknown. Our aim was to study early outcomes after MT in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Multicenter, European, cohort study involving 34 stroke centers in France, Italy, Spain, and Belgium. Data were collected between March 1, 2020 and May 5, 2020. Consecutive laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases with large vessel occlusion, who were treated with MT, were included. Primary investigated outcome: 30-day mortality. SECONDARY OUTCOMES: early neurological improvement (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale improvement ≥8 points or 24 hours National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 0-1), successful reperfusion (modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction grade ≥2b), and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. RESULTS: We evaluated 93 patients with COVID-19 with large vessel occlusion who underwent MT (median age, 71 years [interquartile range, 59-79]; 63 men [67.7%]). Median pretreatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score were 17 (interquartile range, 11-21) and 8 (interquartile range, 7-9), respectively. Anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke represented 93.5% of cases. The rate modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction 2b to 3 was 79.6% (74 patients [95% CI, 71.3-87.8]). Thirty-day mortality was 29% (27 patients [95% CI, 20-39.4]). Early neurological improvement was 19.5% (17 patients [95% CI, 11.8-29.5]), and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was 5.4% (5 patients [95% CI, 1.7-12.1]). Patients who died at 30 days exhibited significantly lower lymphocyte count, higher levels of aspartate, and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase). After adjustment for age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score, and successful reperfusion, these biological markers remained associated with increased odds of 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio of 2.70 [95% CI, 1.21-5.98] per SD-log decrease in lymphocyte count, 2.66 [95% CI, 1.22-5.77] per SD-log increase in aspartate, and 4.30 [95% CI, 1.43-12.91] per SD-log increase in LDH). CONCLUSIONS: The 29% rate of 30-day mortality after MT among patients with COVID-19 is not negligible. Abnormalities of lymphocyte count, LDH and aspartate may depict a patient's profiles with poorer outcomes after MT. Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT04406090.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Endovascular Procedures , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Endovascular Procedures/mortality , Europe , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombectomy/mortality , Treatment Outcome
11.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(2): 105429, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-899244

ABSTRACT

The current Coronavirus pandemic due to the novel SARS-Cov-2 virus has proven to have systemic and multi-organ involvement with high acuity neurological conditions including acute ischemic strokes. We present a case series of consecutive COVID-19 patients with cerebrovascular disease treated at our institution including 3 cases of cerebral artery dissection including subarachnoid hemorrhage. Knowledge of the varied presentations including dissections will help treating clinicians at the bedside monitor and manage these complications preemptively.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Dissecting/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Hemorrhagic Stroke/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Intensive Care Units , Intracranial Aneurysm/mortality , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Patient Admission , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aneurysm, Dissecting/diagnosis , Aneurysm, Dissecting/therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hemorrhagic Stroke/diagnosis , Hemorrhagic Stroke/therapy , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/diagnosis , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
12.
Eur J Neurol ; 27(12): 2641-2645, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-877180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Comorbidity of acute ischaemic stroke with Covid-19 is a challenging condition, potentially influencing the decision of whether to administer intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). We aimed to assess the 1-month outcome in ischaemic stroke patients with Covid-19 infection who received IVT alone or before thrombectomy (bridging therapy). METHODS: As a collaboration initiative promoted by the Italian Stroke Organization, all Italian stroke units (n = 190) were contacted and invited to participate in data collection on stroke patients with Covid-19 who received IVT. RESULTS: Seventy-five invited centers agreed to participate. Thirty patients received IVT alone and 17 received bridging therapy between 21 February 2020 and 30 April 2020 in 20 centers (n = 18, Northern Italy; n = 2, Central Italy). At 1 month, 14 (30.4%) patients died and 20 (62.5%) survivors had a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 3 to 5. At 24 to 36 hours, asymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) was reported in eight (17.4%) patients and symptomatic ICH (sICH) in two (4.3%) patients. Causes of death were severe ischaemic stroke (n = 8), a new ischaemic stroke (n = 2), acute respiratory failure (n = 1), acute renal failure (n = 1), acute myocardial infarction (n = 1), and endocarditis (n = 1). In survivors with a 1-month mRS score of 3 to 5, baseline glucose level was higher, whereas endovascular procedure time in cases of bridging therapy was longer. Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale glucose and creatinine levels were higher in patients who died. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous thrombolysis for patients with stroke and Covid-19 was not a rare event in the most affected areas by pandemic, and rates of 1-month unfavorable outcomes were high compared to previous data from the pre-Covid-19 literature. However, risk of sICH was not increased.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Creatinine/blood , Female , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Injections, Intravenous , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Survival Analysis , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome
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