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1.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 17(7): 102799, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231223

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The DaR Global survey was conducted to observe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the intentions to fast and the outcomes of fasting in people with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). METHODS: Muslim people with diabetes and CKD were surveyed in 13 countries shortly after the end of Ramadan 2020, using a simple Survey Monkey questionnaire. RESULTS: This survey recruited 6736 people with diabetes, of which 707 (10.49%) had CKD. There were 118 (16.69%) people with type1 diabetes (T1D), and 589 (83.31%) were with type2 diabetes (T2D). 62 (65.24%) people with T1D and 448 (76.06%) people with T2D had fasted with CKD. Episodes of hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia were more frequent among people with T1D compared to T2D, 64.52% and 43.54% vs 25.22% and 22.32% respectively. Visits to the emergency department and hospitalization were more frequent among people with CKD, however no significant difference was found between people with T1D and T2D. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic had only a minor effect on the intention to fast during Ramadan in people with diabetes and CKD. However, hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia were found to be more frequent, as well as emergency visits and hospital admissions among people with diabetic kidney disease. Prospective studies are needed in future to evaluate the risk indicators of hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia among fasting people with CKD, especially in the context of different stages of kidney disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Hyperglycemia , Hypoglycemia , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Fasting , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Hypoglycemia/epidemiology , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Islam , Hypoglycemic Agents
2.
Brain Behav ; 13(5): e2990, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304319

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Muslims fast every year during the month of Ramadan from dawn until dusk. This study examined mental well-being and correlating factors among Nigerian adults who observed Ramadan intermittent fasting (RIF). METHODS: A validated generalized anxiety disorder-2 and Patient Health Questionnaire-2, the four-item spiritual well-being index, and the Islamic intrinsic religiosity questionnaire were used to collect data about mental well-being (depression, anxiety), spirituality, and intrinsic religiosity through a web-based survey between the May 9, 2021 (27th of Ramadan, 1442) and the June 4, 2021 (29th of Shawwal, 1442). We studied the mental well-being of respondents over a period of 4 weeks before Ramadan (BR) and during the 4 weeks of Ramadan between the April 12, 2021 and the May 12, 2021(DR). Multinomial regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with depression and anxiety. This research did not receive any grant or funding. RESULTS: A total of 770 adult Nigerians who observed RIF study were included in this cross-sectional study. When compared to mental well-being BR, observing RIF by Nigerian adult respondents was associated with a significant improvement in their mental well-being. A higher proportion of respondents felt less depressed DR (61.3% vs. 56.5%. < .001). Interest and pleasure in doing things improved DR than BR (p= 0.007) and respondents felt less nervous and anxious (60.7% vs. 57.1%, respectively; p <.001). Mental well-being was independently associated with sociodemographic characteristics, physical activity, and perceived relationships. CONCLUSIONS: This study found significant improvement in mental well-being DR compared to BR despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The effect of RIF on mental well-being needs further research with multicentric studies among different sets of ethnic populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intermittent Fasting , Adult , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Fasting , Islam
3.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol ; 28(4): 533-543, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304696

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine perceptions and experiences of adversity and resilience among Somalis living in San Diego. METHOD: A community-driven, qualitative investigation was conducted through virtual focus group discussions (n = 4) with male and female Somali refugee adults in San Diego (a total of 22 individuals). Barriers to well-being and the historical, religious, and cultural supports that enable participants to overcome adversity were discussed. Qualitative data were analyzed in Dedoose using thematic analysis to identify the most salient themes and relationships between them. RESULTS: Participants identified the primary barriers to good mental health as difficulties in accessing resources (housing, employment, healthcare) and discrimination due to racism, xenophobia, and Islamophobia. In contrast, resilient responses to adversity are supported by a collective identity as survivors, their Islamic faith and its perspective on making sense of adversity, and a sense of communal oneness that encourages reciprocal helping behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that resilient outcomes among Somalis in San Diego are more likely to be promoted by community-based interventions that promote existing strengths and supports rather than focusing on individual coping mechanisms. There is a benefit to investing in community organizations and programs that support resilience-based interventions to overcome common mental disorders in this high-risk population. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Refugees , Adult , Male , Humans , Female , Somalia , Refugees/psychology , Focus Groups , Adaptation, Psychological , Islam
4.
Can J Public Health ; 114(3): 378-388, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278046

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Older Muslim immigrants experience multiple vulnerabilities living in Canada. This study explores the experiences of Muslim older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic to identify ways to build community resilience as part of a community-based participatory research partnership with a mosque in Edmonton, Alberta. METHODS: Using a mixed-methods approach, check-in surveys (n = 88) followed by semi-structured interviews (n = 16) were conducted to assess the impact of COVID-19 on older adults from the mosque congregation. Quantitative findings were reported through descriptive statistics, and thematic analysis guided the identification of key findings from the interviews using the socio-ecological model. RESULTS: Three major themes were identified in consultation with a Muslim community advisory committee: (a) triple jeopardy leading to loneliness, (b) decreased access to resources for connectivity, and (c) organizational struggles to provide support during the pandemic. The findings from the survey and interviews highlight various supports that were missing during the pandemic for this population. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the challenges associated with aging in the Muslim population and contributed to further marginalization, with mosques being sites of support during times of crises. Policymakers and service providers must explore ways of engaging mosque-based support systems in meeting the needs of older Muslim adults during pandemics.


RéSUMé: OBJECTIF: Les immigrants musulmans âgés vivant au Canada sont confrontés à des vulnérabilités multiples. Cette étude explore les expériences des personnes âgées musulmanes durant la pandémie de COVID-19 afin d'identifier des moyens pour renforcer la résilience communautaire dans le cadre d'un partenariat de recherche participative communautaire (CBPR) avec une mosquée à Edmonton, en Alberta. MéTHODES: À l'aide d'une approche à méthodes mixtes, des enquêtes de contrôle (n = 88) suivies d'entretiens semi-dirigés (n = 16) ont été menés pour évaluer l'impact du COVID-19 sur les personnes âgées de la congrégation de la mosquée. Les résultats quantitatifs ont été rapportés au moyen de statistiques descriptives, tandis que l'analyse thématique a guidé l'identification des principaux résultats des entretiens à l'aide du modèle socio-écologique. RéSULTATS: Trois thèmes majeurs ont été identifiés en concertation avec un comité consultatif de la communauté musulmane : a) triple péril menant à la solitude, b) accès réduit aux ressources pour la connectivité, et c) luttes organisationnelles pour fournir un soutien pendant la pandémie. Les résultats de l'enquête et des entretiens mettent en évidence le manque d'aides diverses à cette population durant la pandémie. CONCLUSION: La pandémie de COVID-19 a exacerbé les défis associés au vieillissement de cette population et a contribué à une marginalisation supplémentaire, les mosquées étant des sites de soutien en temps de crise. Les décideurs politiques et les prestataires de services doivent explorer les moyens d'engager les systèmes d'aide basés dans les mosquées pour répondre aux besoins des adultes musulmans âgés pendant les pandémies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emigrants and Immigrants , Humans , Aged , Islam , Pandemics , Alberta/epidemiology , Community-Based Participatory Research , COVID-19/epidemiology
5.
J Relig Health ; 62(2): 1379-1393, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2250607

ABSTRACT

The current study seeks to analyze Muslim experiences of communicative diseases with a focus on the psychosocial impacts and public, communal, and personal responses of Muslim populations throughout history. By examining a selection of plague outbreaks between the 8-19th centuries across the lands broadly defined as the Islamic Mediterranean (Varlik, 2017), the guidelines and coping mechanisms that Muslims extracted from their traditional sources are highlighted. This historical perspective contributes to a better understanding of the psychological and social aspects of pandemics for the Muslim community, specifically for the role played by faith and spirituality as determinants of psychological well-being in Muslims' perceptions and responses. We suggest that such an understanding is especially useful for contemporary mental health practitioners working with Muslim patients through the global COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Plague , Humans , Islam/psychology , Pandemics , Civilization
6.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 17(2): 102707, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241369

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of iGlarLixi in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) fasting during Ramadan. METHODS: SoliRam was a multinational, prospective, single-arm, real-world observational study conducted during Ramadan 2020 and 2021 in adults with T2D treated with iGlarLixi ≥3 months at study entry. The primary endpoint was the percentage of participants experiencing ≥1 episode of severe and/or symptomatic documented hypoglycemia (<70 mg/dL [<3.9 mmol/L]). RESULTS: Among the 409 eligible participants followed during Ramadan, 96.8% fasted for ≥25 days and 92.4% did not break fasting during Ramadan. Four participants broke their fast due to hypoglycemia. Minimal adjustments were seen in antihyperglycemic therapies from pre to during Ramadan. Documented symptomatic hypoglycemia was experienced by 1.0%, 2.3%, and 0.3% of participants, respectively, during the last month of pre-Ramadan, Ramadan, and first month post-Ramadan. Mean change in HbA1c from pre-to post-Ramadan periods was -0.75% (-8.2 mmol/mol), and participants with HbA1c <7% (<53 mmol/mol) increased from 7.9% pre-Ramadan to 28.6% post-Ramadan. CONCLUSIONS: iGlarLixi is an effective and well-tolerated therapy for people with T2D, including those who intend to fast during Ramadan, and is associated with a low risk of hypoglycemia; benefits were observed both during and after Ramadan.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Hypoglycemia , Adult , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Blood Glucose , Prospective Studies , Glycated Hemoglobin , Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects , Hypoglycemia/chemically induced , Hypoglycemia/prevention & control , Islam , Fasting
7.
Br J Soc Psychol ; 62(3): 1141-1157, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2223273

ABSTRACT

The comprehensive analysis of social identity cannot simply focus on individuals' cognitive self-definition. Rather it should also theorize the social conditions that affect individuals' opportunities to act in terms of those self-definitions. We argue that the social distancing interventions associated with Covid-19 provide an opportunity to explore the significance of otherwise taken-for-granted social factors which routinely support and sustain individuals' identity enactments. Using qualitative data gathered with 20 members of the Scottish Muslim community (19 diary entries and 20 post-diary interviews), we explore their experiences of restricted access to community-relevant social spaces (e.g., mosques and prayer rooms). Our analysis shows that while these regulations could result in new opportunities for Muslims' religious identity enactments, they also impeded their abilities to act in terms of their religious identification. Addressing such impediments, we develop our understanding of the contextual factors that shape individuals' abilities to enact identity-defining norms and values.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Identification , Humans , Islam/psychology , Pandemics , Scotland
8.
J Relig Health ; 61(6): 4913-4922, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513729

ABSTRACT

Technologies used in medicine have meant that treatments can keep people biologically alive but often fail to provide meaningful recovery and quality of life. Many of those from the Islamic faith have relied on these technologies for recovery on religious grounds, even when it may be against clinical advice. This commentary seeks to challenge this notion among many Muslims and suggests there is a psycho-spiritual motivation within the Islamic tradition in not pursuing intensive care treatment that is deemed futile by clinicians. A wish to embrace death in these situations should be expressed to loved ones, and the dying person's loved ones should be encouraged to embrace death, in order to minimise harm from disagreements between clinical staff and family.


Subject(s)
Islam , Religion and Medicine , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Quality of Life
9.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1061072, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2199545

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is one of the most significant public health emergencies in decades and has affected all countries worldwide. Religious leaders have been recognized as playing a pivotal role in health promotion during times of crisis. This study explored the role that Muslim and Christian religious leaders played in Israel during the pandemic, and the impact that their activities had on the community. Methods: A qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews was conducted with Muslim and Christian religious leaders and health policy makers from the Arab community. Intensive purposeful sampling was used to locate the two target audiences. Interview protocols were developed and included questions about the role they played during the pandemic, challenges they faced, and dialogue and partnerships they had. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic content analysis. Results: Ten Muslim Sheikhs, three Christian clergy, and four health policy makers were interviewed. Religious leaders played a predominant role in promoting health during the COVID-19 crisis. Both religious leaders and health policy makers reported similar challenges including dealing with fake news and the conspiracy theory, social events and gatherings, frustrations about gaps in policy toward religious institutions, and lack of trust toward State. Health policy makers recognized the key role religious leaders played and emphasized the importance of engaging religious leaders. Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for partnership between health policy makers and religious leaders. Religious leaders should play an integral and integrated role in promoting health during future health crises, not only in implementation of guidelines but also in development of policy so that the guidelines are tailored and sensitive to specific communities to avoid conflicts. As trusted authorities, religious leaders serve as a bridge between health authorities and communities and can be mediators who reconcile science, policy and religious perspectives. The routine cooperation between decision makers, opinion leaders, and religious leaders as social gatekeepers can increase the public's level of trust in the system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Islam , Humans , Israel , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Arabs
10.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 27(1): 352-358, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2205447

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current study explores the impact of Prophetic medicine's knowledge, attitudes, and practices on the Saudi population during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This study used a web-based cross-sectional design. A self-selected nonprobability sampling technique was utilized to recruit social media users in Saudi Arabia aged ≥18. RESULTS: Four statements were used to evaluate participants' knowledge of the role of prophetic medicine in preventing and treating COVID-19. The participants had significant levels of knowledge, with an average of 90.3% correct answers. They strongly agreed with prophetic advice, including quarantine, travel bans and hand washing to prevent COVID-19 infection, with a mean of 4.3. In addition, the participants followed prophetic advice, including walking for half an hour, keeping social distance, wearing masks, and taking vaccines to prevent COVID-19 infection, with a mean of 4.2. CONCLUSIONS: The current study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Muslim residents of Saudi Arabia concerning prophetic medicine during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study revealed that participants had good knowledge of prophetic medicine, including the use of natural products such as honey, ginger, garlic, and olive oil, as well as herbal products such as black seeds, and practices such as cupping. The study also showed that participants strongly believed that COVID-19 preventative measures - including quarantine, travel bans, and handwashing - were introduced by prophetic medicine. Practices including self-isolation, hand washing, and travel bans help prevent, treat and control diseases. They assist in maintaining good health and developing resistance to diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Islam , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Religion and Medicine , Islam/psychology
11.
Heart ; 108(4): 258-265, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137872

ABSTRACT

Ramadan fasting is observed by most of the 1.8 billion Muslims around the world. It lasts for 1 month per the lunar calendar year and is the abstention from any food and drink from dawn to sunset. While recommendations on 'safe' fasting exist for patients with some chronic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, guidance for patients with cardiovascular disease is lacking. We reviewed the literature to help healthcare professionals educate, discuss and manage patients with cardiovascular conditions, who are considering fasting. Studies on the safety of Ramadan fasting in patients with cardiac disease are sparse, observational, of small sample size and have short follow-up. Using expert consensus and a recognised framework, we risk stratified patients into 'low or moderate risk', for example, stable angina or non-severe heart failure; 'high risk', for example, poorly controlled arrhythmias or recent myocardial infarction; and 'very high risk', for example, advanced heart failure. The 'low-moderate risk' group may fast, provided their medications and clinical conditions allow. The 'high' or 'very high risk' groups should not fast and may consider safe alternatives such as non-consecutive fasts or fasting shorter days, for example, during winter. All patients who are fasting should be educated before Ramadan on their risk and management (including the risk of dehydration, fluid overload and terminating the fast if they become unwell) and reviewed after Ramadan to reassess their risk status and condition. Further studies to clarify the benefits and risks of fasting on the cardiovascular system in patients with different cardiovascular conditions should help refine these recommendations.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Failure , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Fasting/adverse effects , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Islam
12.
Curr Opin Pulm Med ; 28(3): 192-198, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077951

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Mass gathering (MG) religious events provide ideal conditions for transmission and globalization of respiratory tract infections (RTIs). We review recent literature on COVID-19 and other RTIs at recurring international annual MG religious and sporting events. RECENT FINDINGS: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic organizers of MG religious and sporting events introduced risk-based infection control measures that limited transmission of RTIs. The 2020 and 2021 Hajj were conducted with limited numbers of pilgrims compared to the annual millions of pilgrims. The Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games were cancelled and held in 2021. The success of the COVID-19 countermeasures at the 2021 Hajj and 2021 Tokyo Olympics was based on implementing good public health and social measures alongside a comprehensive testing strategy. SUMMARY: MG events are associated with transmission of a range of bacterial and viral RTIs. Introducing risk based a multitude of public health interventions can reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and other RTIs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Tract Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Islam , Mass Gatherings , Pandemics/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel
13.
BMC Nephrol ; 23(1): 304, 2022 09 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038672

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a growing literature on guidelines regarding Ramadan fasting for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. However, most studies only consider the impact of fasting on renal function. This study additionally aims to assess factors influencing Ramadan fasting in patients with CKD. METHOD: This is a prospective before and after cohort study. CKD patients were counseled regarding fasting and followed-up post-Ramadan for renal function status, actual fasting behavior, and other relevant outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 360 patients who attended the pre-Ramadan consultation, 306 were reachable after Ramadan of whom 55.3% were female. Of these 306 67.1% reported that they had fasted, 4.9% had attempted to fast but stopped, and 28% did not fast at all. Of these 74 has a post-fasting kidney test. Of the patients, 68.1% had stage 3A CKD, 21.7% had stage 3B, 7.9% stage 4, and only 2% stage 5. Of those who fasted, 11.1% had a drop in Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) of 20% or more. Those who did not fast (16.7%) presented a similar drop. Conversely, among the few who attempted to fast and had to stop, half showed a drop in eGFR of more than 20%. In linear regression, fasting was not associated with post-Ramadan eGFR, when controlling for age and baseline eGRF. There were 17 (5.6%) significant events, including one death. More significant events occurred among the group who fasted some of Ramadan days, 26.7% of the subjects experienced an adverse event-while 4.7% of the group who did not fast had a significant adverse event compared to 4.4% among those who fasted all Ramadan. CONCLUSION: Fasting was not a significant determining factor in renal function deterioration in the study's population, nor did it have any significant association with adverse events.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Female , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Humans , Islam , Male , Prospective Studies
14.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1649, 2022 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021263

ABSTRACT

Severe procedures were undertaken globally because of the COVID-19 pandemic to overcome the spread of the disease and to prevent catastrophic results affecting the health care system including social distancing, lockdowns, and quarantines. Despite the widely known health benefits of Ramadan fasting, there was a general concern regarding the lifestyle of people during Ramadan 2020 that accompanied the period of COVID-19 pandemic and the home confinement applied. The main objective for the current cross-sectional investigation was to investigate the influence of Covid-19 lockdown during Ramadan fasting on weight change on 481 participants in Saudi Arabia. Identifying the contributing risk factors to weight gain were also addressed. Around 42% of the participants had gained weight and around 38% of the participants had lost weight. Physical activity level was shown to be considered as a protective factor against weight gain (OR = 1.03 with P = 0.008), while increasing the number of meals and not adapting healthy cooking methods can both be considered as contributing factors to weight gain (OR = 1.03 with P = 0.009, and OR = 1.03 with P = 0.004, respectively). Assessing these changes during Ramadan of COVID-19 quarantine provided valuable perspective on the health and wellbeing of Saudi Arabia citizens. These findings should be considered in future studies to explore the persistence of Covid-19 related weight status and habit change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Habits , Humans , Islam , Life Style , Pandemics/prevention & control , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Weight Gain
15.
J Relig Health ; 61(5): 3567-3570, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2014289

ABSTRACT

In this fifth issue of the Journal of Religion and Health for 2022, four key themes are revisited: (1) mental health, (2) Islam, (3) various clinical issues relating to religiosity and/or spirituality and (4) the ongoing concerns of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Islam , Humans , Islam/psychology , Mental Health , Religion , Spirituality
16.
J Relig Health ; 61(5): 4155-4168, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2014287

ABSTRACT

While many have implemented best practices intended to help stem the spread of COVID-19, there are also a substantial number of citizens, both domestically and abroad, who have resisted these practices. We argue that public health authorities, as well as scientific researchers and funders, should help address this resistance by putting greater effort into ascertaining how existing religious practices and beliefs align with COVID-19 guidelines. In particular, we contend that Euro-American scholars-who have often tended to implicitly favor secular and Christian worldviews-should put added focus on how Islamic commitments may (or may not) support COVID-19 best practices, including practices that extend beyond the domain of support for mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Islam , Christianity , Humans , Religion
17.
Eur J Public Health ; 32(6): 985-987, 2022 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001268

ABSTRACT

Vaccination campaigns amid the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have been extensively politicized in a number of countries. Controlling for a number of demographic, social and economic factors, we find a negative statistical relationship between the aggregate vote share of the populist-right wing Forum for Democracy and the vaccination rate against COVID-19 across Dutch municipalities. We also find a negative relationship between the proportion of individuals with reformed Protestant and Muslim religious beliefs. These relationships can possibly be related to religious worldviews or mistrust towards authority. These results show that the politicization of health behaviours can have detrimental effects on public health campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cities , Islam , Vaccination
18.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 49: 102418, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1977870

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms are frequent in pilgrims at the Grand Magal of Touba (GMT). METHODS: Pilgrims were prospectively investigated in 2017-2021 for demographics, chronic conditions, preventive measures, respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms, and pathogen carriage using PCR assays. RESULTS: 535 pilgrims were included. 54.8% and 13.3% reported respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms, respectively. 18.4% acquired respiratory viruses, notably rhinovirus (10.1%) and coronaviruses (5.6%) and 39.9% bacteria, notably Haemophilus influenzae (18.9%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (14.1%). The acquisition of gastrointestinal pathogens was lower, with enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (18.9%) and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (10.5%) being the most frequent. A decrease was observed in the acquisition rates of pathogens in 2020-2021 GMT. Female pilgrims were more at risk of respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms. Respiratory symptoms were associated with virus acquisition (aRR: 2.20, 95%CI [1.38-3.50]) and S. pneumoniae acquisition (aRR: 2.76, 95%CI = [1.64-4.62]). Using hand soap was associated with a decrease in the acquisition of rhinovirus (aRR: 0.42, 95%CI [0.22-0.80]) and coronavirus (aRR: 0.42, 95%CI [0.22-0.81]). Using face masks was associated with a decrease in reporting of respiratory symptoms (aRR: 0.54, 95% [0.35-0.86]). CONCLUSION: Hand washing with soap and wearing face masks should be recommended to GMT pilgrims.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Tract Infections , Viruses , Bacteria , Female , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Islam , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Risk Factors , Saudi Arabia , Soaps , Travel , Viruses/genetics
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957312

ABSTRACT

The paper explores how COVID-19-related moral panics have led to fear and othering practices among returnee Nepalese migrants from India and Muslims living in Nepal. This qualitative study included in-depth interviews with 15 returnee migrants, 15 Muslims from Kapilvastu and Banke districts of Nepal, and eight interviews with media and health professionals, and representatives from migration organisations. Four themes emerged from our data analysis: (1) rumours and mis/disinformation; (2) impact of rumours on marginalised groups (with three sub-themes: (i) perceived fear; (ii) othering practices; (iii) health and social impact); (3) resistance; and (4) institutional response against rumours. Findings suggest that rumours and misinformation were fuelled by various media platforms, especially social media (e.g., Facebook, YouTube) during the initial months of the lockdown. This created a moral panic which led to returnee migrants and Muslim populations experiencing fear and social isolation. Resistance and effective institutional responses to dispel rumours were limited. A key contribution of the paper is to highlight the lived experiences of COVID-19 related rumours on marginalised groups. The paper argues that there is a need for clear government action using health promotion messages to tackle rumours (health-related or otherwise), mis/disinformation and mitigating the consequences (hatred and tensions) at the community level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Fear , Humans , Islam , Nepal
20.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 16(8): 102567, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1936311

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are advised to have a "pre-Ramadan" visit to receive the assessment and education needed to safely fast during the holy month of Ramadan. The COVID-19 lockdown has interrupted this standard of care in Muslim-majority countries where telemedicine is not well-established. Here, we examined the impact of virtual"pre-Ramadan" visits, as an alternative option to the traditional (in-person) visits, on fasting experience and glycemic control during Ramadan in people with T1D. METHOD: 151 individuals with T1D were categorized into 3 groups according to the type of"pre-Ramadan" visit that they attended in 2020: virtual (n = 50), in-person (n = 56), and no visit (n = 45). Number of days fast was broken and CGM metrics were retrospectively compared across the groups. RESULT: Patients who had a virtual"pre-Ramadan" visit were more likely to use continuous glucose monitors (CGM) than those who had no visit (61.7% and 38.6%, respectively, p < 0.05). Attending a virtual"pre-Ramadan" visit was associated with the least number of days fast was broken compared to those who had no visit (p < 0.01) or in-person visit (p = 0.02). CGM time in range (TIR) during Ramadan was the highest in those who had virtual "Pre-Ramadan" visits compared to those who had no visit or in-person visits (59%, 44%, and 47%,respectively). After adjusting for age, gender, pre-Ramadan A1c, and CGM use, the odds of fasting most days of Ramadan were highest in the virtual group [OR (CI): 9.13 (1.43, 58.22)] followed by the in-person group [3.02 (0.54,16.68)] compared to the no visit group. CONCLUSION: Virtual"pre-Ramadan" visits are effective alternative to in-person visits when managing people with T1D who plan to fast during Ramadan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Telemedicine , Blood Glucose , Communicable Disease Control , Fasting , Glycemic Control , Humans , Islam , Retrospective Studies
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