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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855631

ABSTRACT

This study explored the living situations, financial conditions, religious obligations, and social distancing of Muslims during the COVID-19 pandemic. In total, 28 Muslim community members living in the Kanto region were recruited; 18 of them were included in in-depth qualitative interviews and 10 in two focus group interviews. The snowball method was used, and the questionnaires were divided into four themes. The audio/video interviews were conducted via Zoom, and NAVIO was used to analyse the data thematically. The major Muslim events were cancelled, and the recommended physical distancing was maintained even during the prayers at home and in the mosques. The Japanese government's financial support to each person was a beneficial step towards social protection, which was highlighted and praised by every single participant. Regardless of religious obligations, the closing of all major mosques in Tokyo demonstrates to the Japanese community how Muslims are serious about adhering to the public health guidelines during the pandemic. This study highlights that the pandemic has affected the religious patterns and behaviour of Muslims from inclusive to exclusive in a community, and recounts the significance of religious commitments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Islam , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
2.
BMJ Open ; 12(5): e058739, 2022 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846525

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This pilot study aimed to evaluate the acceptability of a codesigned, culturally tailored, faith-based online intervention to increase uptake of breast, colorectal and cervical screening in Scottish Muslim women. The intervention was codesigned with Scottish Muslim women (n=10) and underpinned by the reframe, reprioritise and reform model and the behaviour change wheel. SETTING: The study was conducted online, using Zoom, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. PARTICIPANTS: Participants (n=18) taking part in the intervention and subsequently in its evaluation, were Muslim women residing in Scotland, recruited through purposive and snowball sampling from a mosque and community organisations. Participants were aged between 25 years and 54 years and of Asian and Arab ethnicity. DESIGN: The study's codesigned intervention included (1) a peer-led discussion of barriers to screening, (2) a health education session led by a healthcare provider, (3) videos of Muslim women's experiences of cancer or screening, and (4) a religious perspective on cancer screening delivered by a female religious scholar (alimah). The intervention was delivered twice online in March 2021, followed 1 week later by two focus groups, consisting of the same participants, respectively, to discuss participants' experiences of the intervention. Focus group transcripts were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Participants accepted the content and delivery of the intervention and were positive about their experience of the intervention. Participants reported their knowledge of screening had increased and shared positive views towards cancer screening. They valued the multidimensional delivery of the intervention, appreciated the faith-based perspective, and in particular liked the personal stories and input from a healthcare provider. CONCLUSION: Participatory and community-centred approaches can play an important role in tackling health inequalities in cancer and its screening. Despite limitations, the intervention showed potential and was positively received by participants. Feasibility testing is needed to investigate effectiveness on a larger scale in a full trial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Adult , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/prevention & control , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Islam , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Qualitative Research , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control
3.
J Relig Health ; 61(3): 2198-2211, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1844427

ABSTRACT

We examined the effects of religiosity on COVID-19 vaccination rates using a cross-national comparison while controlling for socio-economic factors and culture. Our analysis, conducted on data from 90 countries representing 86% of the world population, showed that Christianity was negatively related to vaccination, while there was no relation with Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and nonbelief. The importance of religion, freedom of expression and belief, sex ratio, median age, and almost all cultural factors were not related to vaccination, whereas Human Development Index was. The influence of different religions on vaccination rates has also been described.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Christianity , Hinduism , Humans , Islam , Religion , Vaccination
4.
Health Promot Int ; 37(1)2022 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806409

ABSTRACT

Social distancing is crucial in breaking the cycle of transmission of COVID-19. However, many religions require the faithful to congregate. In Malaysia, the number of COVID-19 cases spiked up from below 30 in February 2020 to more than a thousand a month later. The sudden increase was mostly linked to a large Islamic gathering attended by 16,000 near the capital, Kuala Lumpur. Another large COVID-19 cluster was from a church gathering in Kuching, Sarawak. Within a few weeks, Malaysia became the worst hit country by COVID-19 in Southeast Asia. While religious leaders have advised social distancing among their congregants, the belief that "God is our shield" is often cited for gathering. There is a need to promote sound decision-making among religious adherents so that they will not prioritize their loyalty to the subjective interpretation of religion over evidence-based medicine. Malaysia, a multi-cultural and multi-faith country, is an example of how religious beliefs could strongly influence health behaviours at individual and community levels. In this article, we detail the religious aspects of COVID-19 prevention and control in Malaysia and discuss the possible role of religious organizations in encouraging sound decision-making among religious adherents in mitigating this crisis. We make recommendations on how to promote a partnership between the healthcare system and religious organizations, and how religion and faith could be integrated into health promotion channels and resources in the response of COVID-19 and future communicable diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Promotion , Humans , Islam , Pandemics , Religion , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(5): 2045855, 2022 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795431

ABSTRACT

This study aims to assess COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among Muslims in Malaysia. A cross-sectional internet-based survey was to determine acceptance of COVID-19 vaccine. Other influential factors, namely socio-demographics, COVID-19 experience, self-perceived level of religiosity, support in immunization, COVID-19 immunization attitudes, and health fatalistic beliefs (measured using the Helpless Inevitability Subscale of the Religious Health Fatalism Questionnaire, RHFQ-HI) were investigated. The majority reported a definite intent to receive the COVID-19 vaccine (57.3%; 95% CI 55.0-59.6) followed by a probable intent (42.7%; 95% CI 40.4-45.0%). COVID-19 immunization attitudes measured by attitudinal barriers to vaccination scores were found to be the strongest influence of COVID-19 vaccination intent, whereby participants who have lower attitudinal barrier scores reported higher COVID-19 vaccination intent (OR = 6.75 ; 95% 5.20-8.75). Although religious health fatalism was not significantly associated with vaccination intent, a significantly higher proportion of participants with score 4-9 (61.9%) in the RHFQ-HI reported intent to receive COVID-19 vaccine than those with a score of 10-20 (53.5%), p < .001. Intervention for people with skeptical attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Islam , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination
6.
J Glob Health ; 12: 04023, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776559

ABSTRACT

Background: Asthma was one of the top causes of hospitalization and unscheduled medical attendances due to acute exacerbations and its complications. In Malaysia, all pilgrims must undergo a mandatory health examination and certified fit to perform pilgrimage. We studied the current organisational and clinical routines of Hajj health examination in Malaysia with a focus on the delivery of care for pilgrims with asthma. Methods: We conducted non-participant observation to obtain ethnographic understanding of Hajj health examination activities for 2019. Observations were guided by a checklist and recorded as notes that were analysed thematically. The study was conducted at 11 public (from each region in Malaysia, namely, North, South, East, West of Peninsular Malaysia, and Sabah and Sarawak of East Malaysia) and two private primary care clinics. Results: We observed considerable variation in the implementation and practice of Hajj health examinations among the 11 public clinics but no marked variation among the private clinics. The short time span of between three to four months was inadequate for disease control measures and had put pressure on health care providers. They mostly viewed the Hajj health examination as merely a certification of fitness to perform the pilgrimage, though respiratory health assessment was often inadequate. The opportunity to optimise the health of pilgrims with asthma by providing the appropriate medications, asthma action plan and asthma education including the preventive measures was disregarded. The preliminary health screening, which aimed to optimise pilgrims' health before the actual Hajj health examination was not appreciated by either pilgrims or health care providers. Conclusions: There is great potential to reform the current system of Hajj health certification in order to optimise its potential benefits for pilgrims with asthma. A systematic approach to restructuring the delivery of Hajj health examination could address the time constraints, clinical competency of primary health care providers and resources limitations.


Subject(s)
Asthma , Travel , Asthma/diagnosis , Humans , Islam , Malaysia
7.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 37: 101692, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764004

ABSTRACT

Social distancing at its various levels has been a key measure to mitigate the transmission of COVID-19. The implementation of strict measures for social distancing is challenging, including in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) due to its level of urbanization, its social and religious norms and its annual hosting of high visibility international religious mass gatherings. KSA started introducing decisive social distancing measures early before the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the Kingdom. These ranged from suspension or cancelations of religious, entertainment and sporting mass gatherings and events such as the Umrah, temporary closure of educational establishments and mosques and postponing all non-essential gatherings, to imposing a curfew. These measures were taken in spite of their socio-economic, political and religious challenges in the interest of public and global health. The effect of these actions on the epidemic curve of the Kingdom and on the global fight against COVID-19 remains to be seen. However, given the current COVID-19 situation, further bold and probably unpopular measures are likely to be introduced in the future.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Crowding , Humans , Islam , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Social Isolation , Travel
8.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 186: 109812, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739664

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Muslim people with T1DM should be actively discouraged from fasting during the COVID-19 pandemic, as diabetes has emerged as a significant risk factor for adverse outcomes of COVID-19 infection. We report the experience of young patients with type 1, type 2 and other types diabetes who fasted during Ramadan 2020 at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic time lockdown. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A Post- Ramadan survey was designed for young patients who fasted during Ramadan in 2020 during COVID pandemic time. The study was conducted to compared the basal characteristics and other parameters in children and adolescents (<18 years), with young adults (≥18 years) with diabetes at Paediatric Diabetes Center in BIRDEM in Bangladesh. RESULTS: Among the study participants, a significantly higher number of participants were in older age group who fasted for more than 15 days (p = 0.045). A considerable proportion (30.7%) of patients developed mild hypoglycaemia, and only eight patients (2.6%) developed moderate to severe hypoglycemia. There was significant reduction of post Ramadan basal insulin dose in both groups (p = 0.001). Although increased bolus insulin dose requirements were observed in older age group, but decreased requirement was observed in younger age group during Ramadan (p = 0.001). Post Ramadan median HbA1C in both groups was increased with marked increase in older age group compared to younger age group though it did not reach the statistical significance. (p = 0.239) CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 pandemic had minor impact on fasting during Ramadan in our cohort, they could fast safely with less complications during Ramadan. Our data supports Ramadan focused diabetes education with ample self-care, young people with diabetes can fast safely during Ramadan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Hypoglycemia , Adolescent , Aged , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Fasting/adverse effects , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Hypoglycemia/epidemiology , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Insulin/therapeutic use , Islam , Pandemics , Young Adult
9.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 3652, 2022 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730320

ABSTRACT

With the increasing global adoption of COVID-19 vaccines, limitations on mass gathering events have started to gradually loosen. However, the large vaccine inequality recorded among different countries is an important aspect that policymakers must address when implementing control measures for such events. In this paper, we propose a model for the assessment of different control measures with the consideration of vaccine inequality in the population. Two control measures are considered: selecting participants based on vaccine efficacy and restricting the event capacity. We build the model using agent-based modeling to capture the spatiotemporal crowd dynamics and utilize a genetic algorithm to assess the control strategies. This assessment is based on factors that are important for policymakers such as disease prevalence, vaccine diversity, and event capacity. A quantitative evaluation of vaccine diversity using the Simpson's Diversity Index is also provided. The Hajj ritual is used as a case study. We show that strategies that prioritized lowering the prevalence resulted in low event capacity but facilitated vaccine diversity. Moreover, strategies that prioritized diversity resulted in high infection rates. However, increasing the prioritization of participants with high vaccine efficacy significantly decreased the disease prevalence. Strategies that prioritized ritual capacity did not show clear trends.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Algorithms , Humans , Islam , Models, Statistical , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
11.
Curr Opin Pulm Med ; 28(3): 192-198, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662145

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Mass gathering (MG) religious events provide ideal conditions for transmission and globalization of respiratory tract infections (RTIs). We review recent literature on COVID-19 and other RTIs at recurring international annual MG religious and sporting events. RECENT FINDINGS: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic organizers of MG religious and sporting events introduced risk-based infection control measures that limited transmission of RTIs. The 2020 and 2021 Hajj were conducted with limited numbers of pilgrims compared to the annual millions of pilgrims. The Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games were cancelled and held in 2021. The success of the COVID-19 countermeasures at the 2021 Hajj and 2021 Tokyo Olympics was based on implementing good public health and social measures alongside a comprehensive testing strategy. SUMMARY: MG events are associated with transmission of a range of bacterial and viral RTIs. Introducing risk based a multitude of public health interventions can reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and other RTIs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Tract Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Islam , Pandemics/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel
12.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262530, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1627791

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effect of fasting on immunity is unclear. Prolonged fasting is thought to increase the risk of infection due to dehydration. This study describes antibiotic prescribing patterns before, during, and after Ramadan in a primary care setting within the Pakistani and Bangladeshi populations in the UK, most of whom are Muslims, compared to those who do not observe Ramadan. METHOD: Retrospective controlled interrupted time series analysis of electronic health record data from primary care practices. The study consists of two groups: Pakistanis/Bangladeshis and white populations. For each group, we constructed a series of aggregated, daily prescription data from 2007 to 2017 for the 30 days preceding, during, and after Ramadan, respectively. FINDINGS: Controlling for the rate in the white population, there was no evidence of increased antibiotic prescription in the Pakistani/Bangladeshi population during Ramadan, as compared to before Ramadan (IRR: 0.994; 95% CI: 0.988-1.001, p = 0.082) or after Ramadan (IRR: 1.006; 95% CI: 0.999-1.013, p = 0.082). INTERPRETATION: In this large, population-based study, we did not find any evidence to suggest that fasting was associated with an increased susceptibility to infection.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Disease Susceptibility/metabolism , Fasting/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , Arabs , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Diseases/drug therapy , Communicable Diseases/transmission , Electronic Health Records , Female , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis/methods , Islam , Male , Middle Aged , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Primary Health Care/trends , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology
13.
J Relig Health ; 61(1): 79-92, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607603

ABSTRACT

Religiously integrated interventions for treating mental illnesses have proved effective. However, many studies have yet to adequately address the effects of Islamic religious-based rituals on mental health among Muslims. The present study investigated the impact of a purposefully designed Islamic religion-based intervention on reducing depression and anxiety disorders among Muslim patients using a randomised controlled trial design. A total of 62 Muslim patients (30 women and 32 men) were divided by gender into two groups, with each group assigned randomly to either treatment or control groups. The participants who received the Islamic-based intervention were compared to participants who received the control intervention. Taylor's (cite date) manifest anxiety scale and Steer and Beck's (cite the date) depression scale were used to examine the effects on depression and anxiety levels. ANCOVA results revealed that the Islamic intervention significantly reduced anxiety levels in women (d = 0.75) and depression levels in men (d = 0.80) compared to the typical care control groups.


Subject(s)
Depression , Islam , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Depression/therapy , Female , Humans , Malaysia , Male
14.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 122(12): 918, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572766

ABSTRACT

No abstract Keywords.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Islam , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(9): 1281-1285, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478142

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic influences the spirituality and mental health of individuals. It also has caused a global economic recession. COVID-19 is easily transmitted and causes death. Consequently, severe prevention and control measures of COVID 19 are required in this situation. This study aims to analyze the relationship between anxiety, stigma, religiosity, economic conditions, and the prevention of COVID-19. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional study was designed. The data collection was taken through online surveys. The population in this study is ninety-two lecturers from the College of Health Sciences and the State Islamic Institute who were chosen using a non-probability snowball sampling technique. Data analysis used logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The results showed that there was a relationship between anxiety (p = 0.001), stigma (p = 0.008), religiosity (p = 0.005) and the efforts to prevent COVID-19, while economic conditions (p = 0.882) were not related to the preventive efforts. The results of multivariate analysis indicated that the most influential variable affecting COVID-19 preventions was the level of anxiety, with an Odds Ratio of 4.9. CONCLUSIONS: There was a relationship between anxiety, stigma, religiosity, and COVID-19 preventions, while there was no relationship between economic conditions and COVID-19 preventions. The most influencing variable was anxiety. Respondents must be able to manage anxiety levels related to COVID-19 with good coping strategies.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Faculty , Social Stigma , Spirituality , Adult , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Islam , Male , Mental Health , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Nurs Sci Q ; 34(4): 448-453, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416774

ABSTRACT

The authors in this article seek to describe the importance of keeping one's beliefs and spiritual practices alive during the COVID-19 pandemic from a Muslim perspective, and it considers this challenge in light of the theory of religious coping and the growing literature on the benefits of mindfulness. It provides nurses and other healthcare providers a view into the beliefs and practices of a Muslim-American family and shows how faith practices can help people not only cope but grow in difficult times. Implications for nursing and healthcare are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Islam , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
18.
J Relig Health ; 60(6): 4579-4599, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404660

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a global phenomenon defined by uncertainty, fear and grief which has resulted in record high levels of stress and anxiety in the first half of 2020. It also led to an increased interest in the study of the role of belief, religion, and spirituality as responses to coping with and responding to the pandemic throughout different societal domains. This study explores the impact of anxiety and stress caused by the pandemic on Muslim academics' subjective well-being. It also explores correlations between coping and spirituality by assessing Muslim academics' coping strategies in overcoming stress and anxiety. To this end, this study sampled 480 Muslim academics ages 25-60 years residing in Muslim countries. The findings show a negative yet significant correlation between anxiety and well-being while also showing a positive and significant correlation between coping strategies and subjective well-being. The research also points to the role of coping strategies in reducing anxiety and stress, the resulting improvements in well-being for Muslim academics, and the mediating effect of coping strategies between anxiety, stress, and well-being for Muslim academics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Humans , Islam , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
19.
S Afr Med J ; 111(9): 13348, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404041

ABSTRACT

Letter by Omar on letter by Jassat et al. (Jassat W, Brey Z, Parker S, et al. A call to action: Temporal trends of COVID-19 deaths in the South African Muslim community. S Afr Med J 2021;111(8):692-694. https://doi.org/10.7196/SAMJ.2021.v111i8.15878); and response by Jassat et al.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Islam , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa
20.
J Relig Health ; 60(5): 3418-3433, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1391938

ABSTRACT

Controversies surrounding the handling of corpses have been amplified during the present COVID-19 pandemic. According to Indonesian scholars, certain perspectives driving these controversies inhibit the implementation of health protocols issued by the government. This study comprehensively explores the diverse perceptions and responses of religious leaders regarding COVID-19 funeral management. Participants comprised six scholars from major Islamic religious organizations, two community leaders, and two families representing COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, content analysis was used to analyze the data. The results showed that the religious leaders, all men aged over 50 years, supported the health directives designed to reduce high transmission risk. However, there were substantial disparities in corpse preparation processes, potentially due to organizational beliefs around burial rites. Some religious leaders aligned their protocols with their religious beliefs. Conversely, families of the deceased insisted that the approved protocol for handling corpses went against their religious and cultural values. Therefore, promotion of protocols and coordination among the government, religious leaders, and the community are needed to decrease the misperceptions and misinformation surrounding the new COVID-19 funeral protocols.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Indonesia , Islam , Male , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
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