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1.
Clin Exp Dermatol ; 47(3): 600-602, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706275

ABSTRACT

We performed a cost estimation of dermatology residency applications prior to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions (2016-2020) and during the COVID-19 pandemic (2021) and surveyed dermatology programme directors to assess the impact of virtual interviews. We found that COVID-19 virtual interviews significantly reduced the cost of applications. We understand that the changes forced by the pandemic were challenging and not ideal; however, the online aspect of interviews provided a way for applicants to save a significant amount of money.


Subject(s)
Dermatology , Internship and Residency/economics , Interviews as Topic , Job Application , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , United States
2.
Clin Exp Dermatol ; 47(3): 600-602, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501386

ABSTRACT

We performed a cost estimation of dermatology residency applications prior to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions (2016-2020) and during the COVID-19 pandemic (2021) and surveyed dermatology programme directors to assess the impact of virtual interviews. We found that COVID-19 virtual interviews significantly reduced the cost of applications. We understand that the changes forced by the pandemic were challenging and not ideal; however, the online aspect of interviews provided a way for applicants to save a significant amount of money.


Subject(s)
Dermatology , Internship and Residency/economics , Interviews as Topic , Job Application , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , United States
4.
Urology ; 159: 22-27, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457368

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To define urology applicant attitudes and usage trends of social media (SM) during the 2021 urology match cycle. METHODS: We emailed an anonymous, de-identified 22-question, multiple choice survey to all applicants to our institution for the 2021 Urology Residency Match. We asked participants about use of SM and which aspects they found useful in the application process. Univariate descriptive analyses were conducted based on survey responses. Chi-square analyses were performed to define significant differences in use of social media and resultant match outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 528 students who registered for the 2021 AUA Match, 398 received our survey (75%), and 144 responded (27% of applicants nationwide). Of survey participants, 49% made a new account on Twitter while 30% had a preexisting account. Most participants (71%) had a preexisting Instagram account, while only 3% made a new account. Most participants agreed Twitter was used as a source to gather information about programs (84%) and learn about events (89%). Participants found SM most helpful for announcing event dates (71%) and highlighting resident social life (59%). Applicants did not match more highly on their rank lists if they used Twitter (P = .427) or Instagram (P = .166) and were not more likely to get more interviews if they used Twitter (P = .246) or Instagram (P = .114) CONCLUSION: Applicants found Twitter to be an important source of information through the virtual interview process. Despite the use of SM by most applicants, published content did not impact rank list decisions nor did SM engagement predict match outcomes.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Job Application , Social Media , Urology/education , Female , Humans , Male
5.
Pediatrics ; 148(4)2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443877

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic significantly impacted undergraduate and graduate medical education and created challenges that prevented a traditional approach to residency and fellowship recruitment and interviews. Early in the pandemic, the pediatric education community came together to support applicants and training programs and to foster an equitable recruitment process. We describe many of our community's innovations, including the use of virtual cafés to educate programs and highlight best practices for virtual recruitment and the use of regional webinars to highlight residency programs and provide information to applicants. Surveys of applicants and programs suggest that the virtual interview process worked well overall, with applicants and programs saving both time and money and programs maintaining a high rate of filling their positions. On the basis of this experience, we highlight the strengths and weaknesses of 3 potential models for future interview seasons. We close with a series of questions that need further investigation to create an effective and equitable recruitment process for the future.


Subject(s)
Fellowships and Scholarships , Internet , Internship and Residency , Interviews as Topic/methods , Pediatrics/education , Personnel Selection/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Job Application , Pandemics , Pediatrics/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
6.
World Neurosurg ; 155: e412-e417, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364511

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the ACGME recommended all interviews for the 2021 residency application cycle be held virtually. Because this is major shift from neurosurgical interviews in past years, this study aims to evaluate both applicant and interviewer satisfaction of conducting interviews virtually. METHODS: For faculty, an 11-question online survey was sent to 116 United States neurosurgery training programs. A 14-question online survey was sent to 255 neurosurgery applicants. The resulting data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. RESULTS: From applicants, 118 responses were received. From faculty, 171 individual responses were received. Thirty-five percent (34.7%) of applicants agreed that they were satisfied with the virtual interview process as a whole. Although 44.5% of faculty disagreed with the statement "I would like to replace in-person interviews with virtual interviews in the future", 57.3% of faculty agreed that they were likely to implement virtual interviews in the future. CONCLUSIONS: Some things might be better assessed through in-person interviews, but there are clear benefits to virtual interviews. Future iterations of the interview process, incorporating virtual interviews, might help determine how and in which situations virtual interviews can be utilized in future residency application cycles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty, Medical/trends , Internship and Residency/trends , Job Application , Neurosurgery/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19/prevention & control , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Neurosurgery/education , Online Systems/trends , United States/epidemiology
8.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(7): 975-989, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354076

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused tremendous job loss and made it difficult for unemployed individuals to search for new jobs. Specifically, the pandemic has created numerous job search obstacles, such as increased childcare and community responsibilities, that interfere with job seekers' ability to search for a job. Yet, the job search literature has scantily examined the implications of such job search constraints for job seekers even in normal times, and the limited studies that do exist have produced mostly null findings. Drawing from self-regulation theories, we position COVID-19 job search constraints as a catalyst for lower hopeful search cognitions but greater reflective metacognitive activities. To account for the distinct mechanism via which health concerns highlighted by the pandemic influence job search, we further contend that job search self-regulation is contingent upon job seekers' COVID-19 invulnerability, a novel resource-protective cognition that reflects an optimistic perception regarding how at risk job seekers feel to catching and falling ill due to COVID-19. In turn, we link such self-regulatory cognition and effort to seekers' job search distress, and job search behaviors and outcomes (i.e., number of job interviews), respectively. We also identify health-related resource loss risk factors (i.e., health status and share of family and friends' COVID-19 exposure) that impact COVID-19 invulnerability perceptions. Collecting three waves of data from 228 unemployed job seekers, we found general support for our model. Theoretical and practical implications of the current research for now and after the pandemic are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Behavior , Job Application , Pandemics , Self-Control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Urology ; 158: 26-32, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331279

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess whether pandemic-related restrictions with video-based interviewing increased geographic clustering of urology applicants matching at a residency program near where they were raised or attended medical school. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We utilized publicly available data from the urology match to compare dispersal patterns between applicants matching during the COVID-19 application cycle (2021) and those matching in the 5 prior application cycles (2016-2020). Variables included home state, undergraduate institution, medical school, and residency. Latitudes and longitudes were obtained for each institution and home state. The primary endpoint was distance (miles, as the most direct path) between medical school and residency program. We also assessed dispersal patterns by American Urological Association section. RESULTS: Of the 1965 applicants matching to a urology program between 2016 and 2021, medical school was identified for 1956 (99.7%) applicants, undergraduate program for 1551 (79%) applicants, and home state for 1351 (69%) applicants. Comparing the COVID-19 application cycle to the 5 prior application cycles, there was no significant difference in the median distance between medical school and residency, undergraduate university and residency, or home state and residency. Similarly, there was no significant difference in the proportion of applicants matching at their home institution, matching from medical schools without a home urology program, matching from medical schools with a historically low volume of urology applicants (<1 matched applicant per year), or matching from a D.O. CONCLUSION: Virtual interviewing and the loss of in-person clinical rotations did not significantly alter dispersal patterns or hamper an applicant's ability to match at program outside their geographic region.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Job Application , Urology/education , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Geography , Schools, Medical , United States
10.
Urology ; 158: 33-38, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313474

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To define applicant response to the 2021 Urology Residency Match Process in the COVID-19 Pandemic and to extrapolate lessons to optimize the urology resident selection process after the pandemic. METHODS: We emailed an anonymous, de-identified 22-question, multiple choice survey to all applicants to our institution for the 2021 Urology Residency Match, including a summary of the study with a survey link (RedCap). RESULTS: Of the 398 survey recipients, 144 responded (36%). Even if the match process were not limited by COVID-19, 39% of applicants thought interviews should remain in virtual format, 23% said "no," and 30% said "not sure." Nearly all applicants (97%) thought all interview offers should be released on the same day. Regarding the early match, 84% thought this should remain. When asked what factors had the most impact on rank lists, faculty and resident interviews were overwhelmingly favored. Open houses and resident "happy hours" were less important. Most applicants agreed that the faculty and resident interviews and informational talks were adequately replicated on the virtual platform. A majority of applicants (65%) spent under $2000 for the application cycle. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically changed the urology match process. The faculty and resident interviews remained the most important factors in program ranking, and most applicants agreed those were adequately replicated in the virtual format. A plurality of applicants felt that the interview process should remain virtual in a post-COVID-19 environment. The virtual application cycle reduced the cost of applying to residency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Job Application , Online Systems , Urology/education , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
11.
Urology ; 157: 44-50, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313473

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess interviewing applicant perceptions of a virtual urology residency interview in the setting of changes mandated by COVID-19 and to determine applicant preference for virtual or in person interviews. Applicant perceptions of multiple interview components were queried to identify program specific and interview modality specific strengths or weaknesses in the 2020 to 2021 Urology Match. METHODS: A 12 question multiple choice and free text survey was emailed to 66 virtually interviewed applicants for open residency positions at a metropolitan training program after conclusion of interviews. Items of interest included interview type preference, overall interview impression, and recommendations for improvement. RESULTS: A total of 50 of 66 (76%) applicants completed the survey corresponding to approximately 11% of the 2020 national urology applicant pool. A total of 49 of 50 (96%) respondents assessed faculty interaction and the virtual platform positively. A total of 38 of 50 (76%) was satisfied with their resident interaction and 32 of 50 (64%) applicants stated they were able to satisfactorily evaluate the site and program. Ultimately, 39 of 50 (78%) respondents would have preferred an in person interview to our virtual interview. Respondents cited challenges in assessing program culture and program physical site virtually. CONCLUSION: The majority of survey respondents indicated a preference for in person interviews. A smaller proportion of applicants preferred virtual interviews citing their convenience and lower cost. Efforts to improve the virtual interview experience may focus on improving applicant-resident interaction and remote site assessment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Interviews as Topic , Job Application , Online Systems , Urology/education , Adult , Female , Humans , Male
13.
Soc Sci Med ; 283: 114181, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284538

ABSTRACT

Mental health problems are associated with poor labour market outcomes. Based on data from a field experiment, this article investigates the extent to which hiring discrimination limits the job opportunities of young applicants who disclose a history of mental health problems. From September 2019 to December 2020, 1398 job applications were sent in pairs to 699 employers with job openings in a broad selection of occupations in the Norwegian labour market. The applicants were equally qualified except that, in each pair, one applicant informed about mental health problems as an explanation for a past employment break. The results show that applicants who disclose mental health problems are discriminated against in hiring processes. Applicants with mental health problems have about 27% lower probability of receiving an invitation to a job interview and about 22% lower probability of receiving any positive employer response. These results do not seem to have been driven by the COVID-19 crisis that unfolded during the course of the study. As such, the study provides suggestive evidence that uncertain economic times might not necessarily increase the level of discrimination against applicants with mental health problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Job Application , Mental Health , Personnel Selection , SARS-CoV-2
15.
JAMA Neurol ; 78(6): 645-646, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269082
16.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(5): 657-673, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258552

ABSTRACT

New labor market entrants face significant hurdles when searching for a job, with these stressors likely amplified during the COVID-19 pandemic. Here, we consider how COVID-induced job search anxiety-feeling anxious about one's job search due to issues imposed by the pandemic-has the potential to affect adaptive, goal-directed efforts, and maladaptive, goal-avoidant reactions. We theorize that this anxiety can prompt job seekers to engage in problem-solving pondering and affect-focused rumination, with these experiences relating to whether job seekers engage in various forms of search-related efforts the following week. In particular, we consider whether job seekers are engaging in dream job search effort (i.e., effort toward pursuing one's dream job), as well as focused (i.e., effort toward a selection of carefully screened jobs), exploratory (i.e., effort toward a wide swath of jobs in a broad manner), and haphazard (i.e., effort toward applying for any job without a clear plan) job search effort. Further, we consider how stable beliefs relevant to the pandemic (i.e., belief in conspiracy theories; belief in COVID-19 being a public health crisis) affect the aforementioned relationships. Using a weekly study of 162 new labor market entrants, results indicated that COVID-induced job search anxiety positively related to problem-solving pondering and affect-focused rumination; problem-solving pondering promoted dream, focused, and exploratory job search effort the following week, whereas affect-focused rumination hindered dream job search effort. Finally, the detrimental effects of COVID-induced job search anxiety via affect-focused rumination were amplified for those who held higher levels of conspiracy theory beliefs. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Job Application , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Problem Solving , Psychological Tests , Rumination, Cognitive , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
17.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 207: 106717, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252595

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine how neurology departments and residency programs in the United States used virtual communication to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic, we investigated the presence and use of social media pages, virtual outreach events, and virtual internship opportunities. METHODS: Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook accounts were identified (or noted as nonexistent) for 159 accredited neurology departments and residency programs. Google searches and social media site specific searches were performed. For existing pages, the date of creation was determined and all posts on and after March 1st, 2020, were assessed to investigate the presence of virtual open house advertisements. Each program was also assessed for virtual sub-internship and elective opportunities on the Visiting Student Application Service (VSAS). RESULTS: A majority of neurology residency programs (110) had a social media presence, particularly on Twitter and Instagram. Most residency program Twitter and Instagram accounts were created after March 1st, 2020, and this was not the case on Facebook. Twitter and Instagram were used most to advertise virtual opportunities. A correlation was observed between presence and number of social media accounts and program prestige. Few programs offered virtual opportunities on VSAS for the 2020-2021 year. CONCLUSION: Neurology residency programs adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic by creating residency social media accounts, primarily on Instagram and Twitter, and hosting virtual informational events. We recommend that neurology residency applicants create professional Instagram and Twitter accounts to network with programs and receive updates about virtual events. Similarly, going forward, we recommend continued social media use by neurology residency programs for applicant outreach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurology/education , Neurology/trends , Social Media/trends , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Job Application , Retrospective Studies , United States
18.
Fertil Steril ; 116(3): 872-881, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233425

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the experience and perceptions of reproductive endocrinology and infertility fellowship applicants and program directors (PDs) regarding the current and future use of web-based interviews (WBIs). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Nationwide cohort. PATIENT(S): Reproductive endocrinology and infertility fellowship applicants and PDs participating in the 2020 application cycle. INTERVENTION(S): Anonymous survey sent to applicants and PDs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Descriptive study evaluating the experience and satisfaction of applicants and PDs with WBIs. RESULT(S): Forty-six percent of applicants and eligible PDs responded to our survey. Most applicants and PDs responded that WBIs were adequate for conveying a sense of a program's strengths, faculty, diversity, clinical training, and research opportunities, but less than half responded that WBIs were adequate in providing a sense of the program's clinical site and facilities. After WBIs, both applicants (73%) and PDs (86%) were able to rank with confidence. The cost of WBIs was significantly lower for both applicants (median: $100) and programs (median: $100) than the costs previously reported for in-person interviews. The applicants interviewed at more programs than they would have if the interviews were on-site, and Zoom was the highest rated platform used. Most applicants and PDs responded that WBIs were an adequate substitute, and that they should continue after the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Furthermore, most of the PDs were planning to continue to use WBIs in some capacity. CONCLUSION(S): Both applicants and PDs had favorable experiences with and perceptions of WBIs, and most endorse the continued use of this interview modality. The findings of this study can help guide and optimize future WBI practices.


Subject(s)
Endocrinology/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Interviews as Topic/methods , Physicians/psychology , Reproductive Medicine/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endocrinology/education , Endocrinology/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Female , Humans , Infertility/therapy , Internet , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Interpersonal Relations , Interviews as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Job Application , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perception , Personal Satisfaction , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Reproductive Medicine/education , Reproductive Medicine/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
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