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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522936

ABSTRACT

After radical nephrectomy, clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) recurs locally in <3% of patients. Recurrences typically occur 1-2 years postoperatively and grow at 5-20 mm per year. In contrast, this patient's recurrence was unexpectedly large and swift. A 71-year-old woman was initially found on workup for recurrent urinary tract infections to have a 12 cm left renal tumour. After negative staging scans, she progressed to left open radical nephrectomy. Histology revealed a stage T2b 12 cm ccRCCwith sarcomatoid differentiation, International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grade 4, with clear margins. Only 3 months later, the patient developed left-sided abdominal pain, and CT scans revealed a 15 cm left retroperitoneal local recurrence, as well as widespread peritoneal tumours. In discussion with her treating team, the patient and her family elected not to undergo biopsy or systemic therapy. The patient was palliated and passed away 8 days after re-presentation.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Renal Cell , Kidney Neoplasms , Aged , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/diagnostic imaging , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Female , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/surgery , Nephrectomy , Treatment Outcome
2.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 32(1): 33-38, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454337

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine effect of body mass index (BMI) on safety and cancer-related outcomes of thermal ablation for renal cell carcinoma (RRC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study evaluated 427 patients (287 men and 140 women; mean [SD] age, 72 [12] y) who were treated with thermal ablation for RCC between October 2006 and December 2017. Patients were stratified by BMI into 3 categories: normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥ 30 kg/m2). Of 427 patients, 71 (16%) were normal weight, 157 (37%) were overweight, and 199 (47%) were obese. Complication rates, local recurrence, and residual disease were compared in the 3 cohorts. RESULTS: No differences in technical success between normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients were identified (P = .72). Primary technique efficacy rates for normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients were 91%, 94%, and 93% (P = .71). There was no significant difference in RCC specific-free survival, disease-free survival, and metastasis-free survival between obese, overweight, and normal-weight groups (P = .72, P = .43, P = .99). Complication rates between the 3 cohorts were similar (normal weight 4%, overweight 2%, obese 3%; P = .71). CONCLUSIONS: CT-guided renal ablation is safe, feasible, and effective regardless of BMI.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Cryosurgery , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Microwaves/therapeutic use , Obesity/diagnosis , Radiofrequency Ablation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/mortality , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/secondary , Cryosurgery/adverse effects , Cryosurgery/mortality , Disease Progression , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Microwaves/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Obesity/mortality , Patient Safety , Radiofrequency Ablation/adverse effects , Radiofrequency Ablation/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
3.
Contemp Clin Trials ; 108: 106482, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427719

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: 20-60% of patients with initially locally advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) develop metastatic disease despite optimal surgical excision. Adjuvant strategies have been tested in RCC including cytokines, radiotherapy, hormones and oral tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs), with limited success. The predominant global standard-of-care after nephrectomy remains active monitoring. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) are effective in the treatment of metastatic RCC; RAMPART will investigate these agents in the adjuvant setting. METHODS/DESIGN: RAMPART is an international, UK-led trial investigating the addition of ICIs after nephrectomy in patients with resected locally advanced RCC. RAMPART is a multi-arm multi-stage (MAMS) platform trial, upon which additional research questions may be addressed over time. The target population is patients with histologically proven resected locally advanced RCC (clear cell and non-clear cell histological subtypes), with no residual macroscopic disease, who are at high or intermediate risk of relapse (Leibovich score 3-11). Patients with fully resected synchronous ipsilateral adrenal metastases are included. Participants are randomly assigned (3,2:2) to Arm A - active monitoring (no placebo) for one year, Arm B - durvalumab (PD-L1 inhibitor) 4-weekly for one year; or Arm C - combination therapy with durvalumab 4-weekly for one year plus two doses of tremelimumab (CTLA-4 inhibitor) at day 1 of the first two 4-weekly cycles. The co-primary outcomes are disease-free-survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes include safety, metastasis-free survival, RCC specific survival, quality of life, and patient and clinician preferences. Tumour tissue, plasma and urine are collected for molecular analysis (TransRAMPART). TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN #: ISRCTN53348826, NCT #: NCT03288532, EUDRACT #: 2017-002329-39, CTA #: 20363/0380/001-0001, MREC #: 17/LO/1875, ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03288532, RAMPART grant number: MC_UU_12023/25, TransRAMPART grant number: A28690 Cancer Research UK, RAMPART Protocol version 5.0.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Renal Cell , Kidney Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Chronic Disease , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Quality of Life , Recurrence
4.
World J Urol ; 39(12): 4295-4303, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241604

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the cancellation or deferment of many elective cancer surgeries. We performed a systematic review on the oncological effects of delayed surgery for patients with localised or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the targeted therapy (TT) era. METHOD: The protocol of this review is registered on PROSPERO(CRD42020190882). A comprehensive literature search was performed on Medline, Embase and Cochrane CENTRAL using MeSH terms and keywords for randomised controlled trials and observational studies on the topic. Risks of biases were assessed using the Cochrane RoB tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. For localised RCC, immediate surgery [including partial nephrectomy (PN) and radical nephrectomy (RN)] and delayed surgery [including active surveillance (AS) and delayed intervention (DI)] were compared. For metastatic RCC, upfront versus deferred cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) were compared. RESULTS: Eleven studies were included for quantitative analysis. Delayed surgery was significantly associated with worse cancer-specific survival (HR 1.67, 95% CI 1.23-2.27, p < 0.01) in T1a RCC, but no significant difference was noted for overall survival. For localised ≥ T1b RCC, there were insufficient data for meta-analysis and the results from the individual reports were contradictory. For metastatic RCC, upfront TT followed by deferred CN was associated with better overall survival when compared to upfront CN followed by deferred TT (HR 0.61, 95% CI 0.43-0.86, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Noting potential selection bias, there is insufficient evidence to support the notion that delayed surgery is safe in localised RCC. For metastatic RCC, upfront TT followed by deferred CN should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/mortality , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Nephrectomy , Survival Rate
5.
Urologia ; 88(1): 3-8, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105635

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically hit all Europe and Northern Italy in particular. The reallocation of medical resources has caused a sharp reduction in the activity of many medical disciplines, including urology. The restricted availability of resources is expected to cause a delay in the treatment of urological cancers and to negatively influence the clinical history of many cancer patients. In this study, we describe COVID-19 impact on uro-oncological management in Piedmont/Valle d'Aosta, estimating its future impact. METHODS: We performed an online survey in 12 urological centers, belonging to the Oncological Network of Piedmont/Valle d'Aosta, to estimate the impact of COVID-19 emergency on their practice. On this basis, we then estimated the medical working capacity needed to absorb all postponed uro-oncological procedures. RESULTS: Most centers (77%) declared to be "much"/"very much" affected by COVID-19 emergency. If uro-oncological consultations for newly diagnosed cancers were often maintained, follow-up consultations were more than halved or even suspended in around two out of three centers. In-office and day-hospital procedures were generally only mildly reduced, whereas major uro-oncological procedures were more than halved or even suspended in 60% of centers. To clear waiting list backlog, the urological working capacity should dramatically increase in the next months; delays greater than 1 month are expected for more than 50% of uro-oncological procedures. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 emergency has dramatically slowed down uro-oncological activity in Piedmont and Valle d'Aosta. Ideally, uro-oncological patients should be referred to COVID-19-free tertiary urological centers to ensure a timely management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care , Health Services Accessibility , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Appointments and Schedules , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Kidney Neoplasms/epidemiology , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/epidemiology , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery , Urologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Urologic Neoplasms/surgery , Urology/organization & administration
7.
Anticancer Res ; 41(1): 335-340, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Large or bilateral multiple renal cell carcinoma (RCC) without/with tumor thrombus (TT) in the renal vein (RV) or inferior vena cava (IVC) poses a challenge to the surgeon due to the potential for massive hemorrhage, tumor thromboemboli and dialysis, and the situation is more critical due to Covid-19 pandemic. We report our experience and measures in dealing with challenging cases of large or multiple RCCs without/with TT during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 4/2020-10/2020, five patients underwent RCC resection with/without TT. Patients 1 and 2 had RCCs/TT in RV; Patient 3 had RCC/TT supradiaphragmatic below right atrium; Patient-4 had a 26 cm RCC; Patient-5 had multiple RCCS as part of Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome. RESULTS: Patients were preoperatively tested negative for Covid-19. Operation times were 105, 85, 255, 200 and 247 minutes for Patients 1-5. Estimated blood loss was: 100, 50, 3,900,100 and 50 ml, respectively. Patient 3 underwent RCC resection en bloc with IVC/TT. Patients 1 and 2 underwent resections of RCC/TT in RV. Patient 4 underwent a 26 cm RCC resection. Patient 5 underwent laparoscopic bilateral radical nephrectomies. No immediate postoperative complications were reported. CONCLUSION: We successfully managed 5 challenging cases of RCCs despite the recommendations imposed by hospitals due to Covid-19 pandemic, with favorable outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/complications , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/diagnosis , Kidney Neoplasms/complications , Kidney Neoplasms/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/etiology , Aged , Biopsy , COVID-19/virology , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplastic Cells, Circulating , Nephrectomy , Renal Veins/pathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
8.
Urol Oncol ; 39(5): 247-257, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-880620

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During COVID-19, many operating rooms were reserved exclusively for emergent cases. As a result, many elective surgeries for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) were deferred, with an unknown impact on outcomes. Since surveillance is commonplace for small renal masses, we focused on larger, organ-confined RCCs. Our primary endpoint was pT3a upstaging and our secondary endpoint was overall survival. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively abstracted cT1b-T2bN0M0 RCC patients from the National Cancer Database, stratifying them by clinical stage and time from diagnosis to surgery. We selected only those patients who underwent surgery. Patients were grouped by having surgery within 1 month, 1-3 months, or >3 months after diagnosis. Logistic regression models measured pT3a upstaging risk. Kaplan Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards models assessed overall survival. RESULTS: A total of 29,746 patients underwent partial or radical nephrectomy. Delaying surgery >3 months after diagnosis did not confer pT3a upstaging risk among cT1b (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.77-1.05, P = 0.170), cT2a (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.69-1.19, P = 0.454), or cT2b (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.62-1.51, P = 0.873). In all clinical stage strata, nonclear cell RCCs were significantly less likely to be upstaged (P <0.001). A sensitivity analysis, performed for delays of <1, 1-3, 3-6, and >6 months, also showed no increase in upstaging risk. CONCLUSION: Delaying surgery up to, and even beyond, 3 months does not significantly increase risk of tumor progression in clinically localized RCC. However, if deciding to delay surgery due to COVID-19, tumor histology, growth kinetics, patient comorbidities, and hospital capacity/resources, should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Medical Oncology/methods , Nephrectomy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology , Epidemics , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Neoplasm Staging , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Time-to-Treatment
9.
Urology ; 147: 50-56, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-779729

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To test for an association between surgical delay and overall survival (OS) for patients with T2 renal masses. Many health care systems are balancing resources to manage the current COVID-19 pandemic, which may result in surgical delay for patients with large renal masses. METHODS: Using Cox proportional hazard models, we analyzed data from the National Cancer Database for patients undergoing extirpative surgery for clinical T2N0M0 renal masses between 2004 and 2015. Study outcomes were to assess for an association between surgical delay with OS and pathologic stage. RESULTS: We identified 11,848 patients who underwent extirpative surgery for clinical T2 renal masses. Compared with patients undergoing surgery within 2 months of diagnosis, we found worse OS for patients with a surgical delay of 3-4 months (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.25) or 5-6 months (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.19-1.91). Considering only healthy patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index = 0, worse OS was associated with surgical delay of 5-6 months (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.21-2.34, P= .002) but not 3-4 months (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.93-1.26, P = 309). Pathologic stage (pT or pN) was not associated with surgical delay. CONCLUSION: Prolonged surgical delay (5-6 months) for patients with T2 renal tumors appears to have a negative impact on OS while shorter surgical delay (3-4 months) was not associated with worse OS in healthy patients. The data presented in this study may help patients and providers to weigh the risk of surgical delay versus the risk of iatrogenic SARS-CoV-2 exposure during resurgent waves of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Decision-Making , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Nephrectomy/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Databases, Factual/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Neoplasm Staging , Nephrectomy/standards , Nephrectomy/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Proportional Hazards Models , Puerto Rico/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends , United States/epidemiology
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