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1.
Comput Math Methods Med ; 2022: 9604456, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704361

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential pharmacological value of extracts from honeysuckle on patients with mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. METHODS: The active components and targets of honeysuckle were screened by Traditional Chinese Medicine Database and Analysis Platform (TCMSP). SwissADME and pkCSM databases predict pharmacokinetics of ingredients. The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database collected transcriptome data for mild COVID-19. Data quality control, differentially expressed gene (DEG) identification, enrichment analysis, and correlation analysis were implemented by R toolkit. CIBERSORT evaluated the infiltration of 22 immune cells. RESULTS: The seven active ingredients of honeysuckle had good oral absorption and medicinal properties. Both the active ingredient targets of honeysuckle and differentially expressed genes of mild COVID-19 were significantly enriched in immune signaling pathways. There were five overlapping immunosignature genes, among which RELA and MAP3K7 expressions were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Finally, immune cell infiltration and correlation analysis showed that RELA, MAP3K7, and natural killer (NK) cell are with highly positive correlation and highly negatively correlated with hematopoietic stem cells. CONCLUSION: Our analysis suggested that honeysuckle extract had a safe and effective protective effect against mild COVID-19 by regulating a complex molecular network. The main mechanism was related to the proportion of infiltration between NK cells and hematopoietic stem cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Lonicera , Phytotherapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Computational Biology , Databases, Pharmaceutical/statistics & numerical data , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/chemistry , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacokinetics , Gene Expression/drug effects , Gene Ontology , Gene Regulatory Networks/drug effects , Gene Regulatory Networks/immunology , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/drug effects , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/immunology , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lonicera/chemistry , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
2.
Clin Transl Sci ; 14(6): 2556-2565, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526359

ABSTRACT

Nezulcitinib (TD-0903), a lung-selective pan-Janus-associated kinase (JAK) inhibitor designed for inhaled delivery, is under development for treatment of acute lung injury associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This two-part, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose (part A) and multiple ascending dose (part B) phase I study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of nezulcitinib in healthy participants. Part A included three cohorts randomized 6:2 to receive a single inhaled dose of nezulcitinib (1, 3, or 10 mg) or matching placebo. Part B included three cohorts randomized 8:2 to receive inhaled nezulcitinib (1, 3, or 10 mg) or matching placebo for 7 days. The primary outcome was nezulcitinib safety and tolerability assessed from treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). The secondary outcome was nezulcitinib PK. All participants completed the study. All TEAEs were mild or moderate in severity, and none led to treatment discontinuation. Overall (area under the plasma concentration-time curve) and peak (maximal plasma concentration) plasma exposures of nezulcitinib were low and increased in a dose-proportional manner from 1 to 10 mg in both parts, with no suggestion of clinically meaningful drug accumulation. Maximal plasma exposures were below levels expected to result in systemic target engagement, consistent with a lung-selective profile. No reductions in natural killer cell counts were observed, consistent with the lack of a systemic pharmacological effect and the observed PK. In summary, single and multiple doses of inhaled nezulcitinib at 1, 3, and 10 mg were well-tolerated in healthy participants, with dose-proportional PK supporting once-daily administration.


Subject(s)
Azetidines/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Imidazoles/adverse effects , Indazoles/adverse effects , Piperidines/adverse effects , Administration, Inhalation , Adult , Area Under Curve , Azetidines/administration & dosage , Azetidines/pharmacokinetics , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Imidazoles/administration & dosage , Imidazoles/pharmacokinetics , Indazoles/administration & dosage , Indazoles/pharmacokinetics , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Piperidines/pharmacokinetics , Young Adult
3.
Clin Transl Sci ; 14(6): 2556-2565, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328998

ABSTRACT

Nezulcitinib (TD-0903), a lung-selective pan-Janus-associated kinase (JAK) inhibitor designed for inhaled delivery, is under development for treatment of acute lung injury associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This two-part, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose (part A) and multiple ascending dose (part B) phase I study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of nezulcitinib in healthy participants. Part A included three cohorts randomized 6:2 to receive a single inhaled dose of nezulcitinib (1, 3, or 10 mg) or matching placebo. Part B included three cohorts randomized 8:2 to receive inhaled nezulcitinib (1, 3, or 10 mg) or matching placebo for 7 days. The primary outcome was nezulcitinib safety and tolerability assessed from treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). The secondary outcome was nezulcitinib PK. All participants completed the study. All TEAEs were mild or moderate in severity, and none led to treatment discontinuation. Overall (area under the plasma concentration-time curve) and peak (maximal plasma concentration) plasma exposures of nezulcitinib were low and increased in a dose-proportional manner from 1 to 10 mg in both parts, with no suggestion of clinically meaningful drug accumulation. Maximal plasma exposures were below levels expected to result in systemic target engagement, consistent with a lung-selective profile. No reductions in natural killer cell counts were observed, consistent with the lack of a systemic pharmacological effect and the observed PK. In summary, single and multiple doses of inhaled nezulcitinib at 1, 3, and 10 mg were well-tolerated in healthy participants, with dose-proportional PK supporting once-daily administration.


Subject(s)
Azetidines/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Imidazoles/adverse effects , Indazoles/adverse effects , Piperidines/adverse effects , Administration, Inhalation , Adult , Area Under Curve , Azetidines/administration & dosage , Azetidines/pharmacokinetics , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Imidazoles/administration & dosage , Imidazoles/pharmacokinetics , Indazoles/administration & dosage , Indazoles/pharmacokinetics , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Piperidines/pharmacokinetics , Young Adult
4.
Mo Med ; 118(1): 68-73, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068428

ABSTRACT

Magnesium and vitamin D each have the possibility of affecting the immune system and consequently the cytokine storm and coagulation cascade in COVID-19 infections. Vitamin D is important for reducing the risk of upper respiratory tract infections and plays a role in pulmonary epithelial health. While the importance of vitamin D for a healthy immune system has been known for decades, the benefits of magnesium has only recently been elucidated. Indeed, magnesium is important for activating vitamin D and has a protective role against oxidative stress. Magnesium deficiency increases endothelial cell susceptibility to oxidative stress, promotes endothelial dysfunction, reduces fibrinolysis and increases coagulation. Furthermore, magnesium deficient animals and humans have depressed immune responses, which, when supplemented with magnesium, a partial or near full reversal of the immunodeficiency occurs. Moreover, intracellular free magnesium levels in natural killer cells and CD8 killer T cells regulates their cytotoxicity. Considering that magnesium and vitamin D are important for immune function and cellular resilience, a deficiency in either may contribute to cytokine storm in the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Immune System Diseases/etiology , Magnesium Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Animals , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Magnesium/administration & dosage , Magnesium/pharmacology , Magnesium/therapeutic use , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Vitamins/pharmacology , Vitamins/therapeutic use
5.
EMBO Mol Med ; 13(1): e12828, 2021 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-914845

ABSTRACT

To circumvent the devastating pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, a humanized decoy antibody (ACE2-Fc fusion protein) was designed to target the interaction between viral spike protein and its cellular receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). First, we demonstrated that ACE2-Fc could specifically abrogate virus replication by blocking the entry of SARS-CoV-2 spike-expressing pseudotyped virus into both ACE2-expressing lung cells and lung organoids. The impairment of viral entry was not affected by virus variants, since efficient inhibition was also observed in six SARS-CoV-2 clinical strains, including the D614G variants which have been shown to exhibit increased infectivity. The preservation of peptidase activity also enables ACE2-Fc to reduce the angiotensin II-mediated cytokine cascade. Furthermore, this Fc domain of ACE2-Fc was shown to activate NK cell degranulation after co-incubation with Spike-expressing H1975 cells. These promising characteristics potentiate the therapeutic prospects of ACE2-Fc as an effective treatment for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells
7.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1512, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-642764

ABSTRACT

Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate immune responders critical for viral clearance and immunomodulation. Despite their vital role in viral infection, the contribution of NK cells in fighting SARS-CoV-2 has not yet been directly investigated. Insights into pathophysiology and therapeutic opportunities can therefore be inferred from studies assessing NK cell phenotype and function during SARS, MERS, and COVID-19. These studies suggest a reduction in circulating NK cell numbers and/or an exhausted phenotype following infection and hint toward the dampening of NK cell responses by coronaviruses. Reduced circulating NK cell levels and exhaustion may be directly responsible for the progression and severity of COVID-19. Conversely, in light of data linking inflammation with coronavirus disease severity, it is necessary to examine NK cell potential in mediating immunopathology. A common feature of coronavirus infections is that significant morbidity and mortality is associated with lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome resulting from an exaggerated immune response, of which NK cells are an important component. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how NK cells respond in both early and late coronavirus infections, and the implication for ongoing COVID-19 clinical trials. Using this immunological lens, we outline recommendations for therapeutic strategies against COVID-19 in clearing the virus while preventing the harm of immunopathological responses.


Subject(s)
Adoptive Transfer/methods , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interferon Type I/therapeutic use , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Mice , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 17(9): 995-997, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-625131

Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Apyrase/antagonists & inhibitors , Apyrase/genetics , Apyrase/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/pathology , B7-H1 Antigen/antagonists & inhibitors , B7-H1 Antigen/genetics , B7-H1 Antigen/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Gene Expression/drug effects , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily C/antagonists & inhibitors , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily C/genetics , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily C/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/genetics , Pneumonia/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/genetics , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/pathology
9.
Cell Biol Int ; 44(9): 1792-1797, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-382103

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is uncontrollably spread all over the world. The host immune responses strongly try to confront it with all the potential cells and cytokines. With chronically condition of SARS-CoV-2, natural killer cells and T cells become exhausted and decreasing their count leads to lymphopenia. Inability to eradicate the infected organ makes hyperinitiation of the immune system, which releases the excessive inflammatory cytokines to compensate the exhausted one as well as the low lymphocytes counts; it consequently leads to the cytokine storm syndrome. These mechanisms and the potential therapeutic targeting are discussed in this paper.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Immunotherapy/methods , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
10.
Nature ; 583(7815): 290-295, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-291856

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a newly emerged coronavirus that is responsible for the current pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which has resulted in more than 3.7 million infections and 260,000 deaths as of 6 May 20201,2. Vaccine and therapeutic discovery efforts are paramount to curb the pandemic spread of this zoonotic virus. The SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) glycoprotein promotes entry into host cells and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. Here we describe several monoclonal antibodies that target the S glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2, which we identified from memory B cells of an individual who was infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2003. One antibody (named S309) potently neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV pseudoviruses as well as authentic SARS-CoV-2, by engaging the receptor-binding domain of the S glycoprotein. Using cryo-electron microscopy and binding assays, we show that S309 recognizes an epitope containing a glycan that is conserved within the Sarbecovirus subgenus, without competing with receptor attachment. Antibody cocktails that include S309 in combination with other antibodies that we identified further enhanced SARS-CoV-2 neutralization, and may limit the emergence of neutralization-escape mutants. These results pave the way for using S309 and antibody cocktails containing S309 for prophylaxis in individuals at a high risk of exposure or as a post-exposure therapy to limit or treat severe disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/drug effects , Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross Reactions/drug effects , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immune Evasion/immunology , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/chemistry , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/immunology , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/pharmacology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/drug effects , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Models, Molecular , Neutralization Tests , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS Virus/chemistry , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Vero Cells
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