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1.
Biomedica ; 41(Sp. 2): 86-102, 2021 10 15.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1529016

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Immunological markers have been described during COVID-19 and persist after recovery. These immune markers are associated with clinical features among SARSCoV-2 infected individuals. Nevertheless, studies reporting a comprehensive analysis of the immune changes occurring during SARS-CoV-2 infection are still limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the antibody response, and the phenotype and function of NK cells and T cells in a Colombian family cluster with SARS-CoV-2 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated by RT-PCR and ELISA. The frequency, phenotype, and function of NK cells (cocultures with K562 cells) and T-cells (stimulated with spike/RdRp peptides) were assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were determined using indirect immunofluorescence and plaque reduction neutralization assay. RESULTS: During COVID-19, we observed a high proinflammatory-cytokine production and a reduced CD56bright-NK cell and cytotoxic response. Compared with healthy controls, infected individuals had a higher frequency of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells CD38+HLA-DR-. During the acute phase, CD8+ T cells stimulated with viral peptides exhibited a monofunctional response characterized by high IL-10 production. However, during recovery, we observed a bifunctional response characterized by the co-expression of CD107a and granzyme B or perforin. CONCLUSION: Although the proinflammatory response is a hallmark of SARS-CoV-2 infection, other phenotypic and functional alterations in NK cells and CD8+ T cells could be associated with the outcome of COVID-19. However, additional studies are required to understand these alterations and to guide future immunotherapy strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , CD56 Antigen/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Colombia , Family Health , Granzymes/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , K562 Cells , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Perforin/metabolism , Phenotype , Receptors, CCR7/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Young Adult
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 697622, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518482

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The longitudinal and systematic evaluation of immunity in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients is rarely reported. Methods: Parameters involved in innate, adaptive, and humoral immunity were continuously monitored in COVID-19 patients from onset of illness until 45 days after symptom onset. Results: This study enrolled 27 mild, 47 severe, and 46 deceased COVID-19 patients. Generally, deceased patients demonstrated a gradual increase of neutrophils and IL-6 but a decrease of lymphocytes and platelets after the onset of illness. Specifically, sustained low numbers of CD8+ T cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells were noted in deceased patients, while these cells gradually restored in mild and severe patients. Furthermore, deceased patients displayed a rapid increase of HLA-DR expression on CD4+ T cells in the early phase, but with a low level of overall CD45RO and HLA-DR expressions on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. Notably, in the early phase, deceased patients showed a lower level of plasma cells and antigen-specific IgG, but higher expansion of CD16+CD14+ proinflammatory monocytes and HLA-DR-CD14+ monocytic-myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) than mild or severe patients. Among these immunological parameters, M-MDSCs showed the best performance in predicting COVID-19 mortality, when using a cutoff value of ≥10%. Cluster analysis found a typical immunological pattern in deceased patients on day 9 after onset, which was characterized as the increase of inflammatory markers (M-MDSCs, neutrophils, CD16+CD14+ monocytes, and IL-6) but a decrease of host immunity markers. Conclusions: This study systemically characterizes the kinetics of immunity of COVID-19, highlighting the importance of immunity in patient prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adaptive Immunity , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/blood , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokines/blood , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 738073, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497076

ABSTRACT

The mechanisms underlying the immune remodeling and severity response in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are yet to be fully elucidated. Our comprehensive integrative analyses of single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq) data from four published studies, in patients with mild/moderate and severe infections, indicate a robust expansion and mobilization of the innate immune response and highlight mechanisms by which low-density neutrophils and megakaryocytes play a crucial role in the cross talk between lymphoid and myeloid lineages. We also document a marked reduction of several lymphoid cell types, particularly natural killer cells, mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, and gamma-delta T (γδT) cells, and a robust expansion and extensive heterogeneity within plasmablasts, especially in severe COVID-19 patients. We confirm the changes in cellular abundances for certain immune cell types within a new patient cohort. While the cellular heterogeneity in COVID-19 extends across cells in both lineages, we consistently observe certain subsets respond more potently to interferon type I (IFN-I) and display increased cellular abundances across the spectrum of severity, as compared with healthy subjects. However, we identify these expanded subsets to have a more muted response to IFN-I within severe disease compared to non-severe disease. Our analyses further highlight an increased aggregation potential of the myeloid subsets, particularly monocytes, in COVID-19. Finally, we provide detailed mechanistic insights into the interaction between lymphoid and myeloid lineages, which contributes to the multisystemic phenotype of COVID-19, distinguishing severe from non-severe responses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cell Differentiation , Cell Proliferation , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Lymphopoiesis , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta/metabolism , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Single-Cell Analysis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Thrombopoiesis
4.
J Clin Invest ; 131(21)2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495789

ABSTRACT

To explore how the immune system controls clearance of SARS-CoV-2, we used a single-cell, mass cytometry-based proteomics platform to profile the immune systems of 21 patients who had recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection without need for admission to an intensive care unit or for mechanical ventilation. We focused on receptors involved in interactions between immune cells and virus-infected cells. We found that the diversity of receptor repertoires on natural killer (NK) cells was negatively correlated with the viral clearance rate. In addition, NK subsets expressing the receptor DNAM1 were increased in patients who more rapidly recovered from infection. Ex vivo functional studies revealed that NK subpopulations with high DNAM1 expression had cytolytic activities in response to target cell stimulation. We also found that SARS-CoV-2 infection induced the expression of CD155 and nectin-4, ligands of DNAM1 and its paired coinhibitory receptor TIGIT, which counterbalanced the cytolytic activities of NK cells. Collectively, our results link the cytolytic immune responses of NK cells to the clearance of SARS-CoV-2 and show that the DNAM1 pathway modulates host-pathogen interactions during SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Receptors, Natural Killer Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Animals , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/immunology , Cohort Studies , Cytotoxicity, Immunologic , Female , Heterografts , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunophenotyping , In Vitro Techniques , Ligands , Male , Mice , Mice, SCID , Middle Aged , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily D/immunology , Pandemics , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , Receptors, Virus/immunology , Viral Load , Young Adult
5.
J Immunol Res ; 2021: 8669098, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476888

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study explored the consistency and differences in the immune cells and cytokines between patients with COVID-19 or cancer. We further analyzed the correlations between the acute inflammation and cancer-related immune disorder. Methods: This retrospective study involved 167 COVID-19 patients and 218 cancer patients. COVID-19 and cancer were each further divided into two subgroups. Quantitative and qualitative variables were measured by one-way ANOVA and chi-square test, respectively. Herein, we carried out a correlation analysis between immune cells and cytokines and used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to discover the optimal diagnostic index. Results: COVID-19 and cancers were associated with lymphopenia and high levels of monocytes, neutrophils, IL-6, and IL-10. IL-2 was the optimal indicator to differentiate the two diseases. Compared with respiratory cancer patients, COVID-19 patients had lower levels of IL-2 and higher levels of CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells. In the subgroup analysis, IL-6 was the optimal differential diagnostic parameter that had the ability to identify if COVID-19 patients would be severely affected, and severe COVID-19 patients had lower levels of lymphocyte subsets (CD3+ T cells, CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD3+CD8+T cells, and CD19+ B cells) and CD16+CD56+ NK cells and higher level of neutrophils. There were significant differences in the levels of CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells between T1-2 and T3-4 stages as well as IL-2 and CD19+ B cells between N0-1 and N2-3 stages while no significant differences between the metastatic and nonmetastatic cancer patients. Additionally, there were higher correlations between IL-2 and IL-4, TNF-α and IL-2, TNF-α and IL-4, TNF-α and IFN-γ, and CD16+CD56+NK cells and various subsets of T cells in COVID-19 patients. There was a higher correlation between CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in cancer patients. Conclusion: Inflammation associated with COVID-19 or cancer had effects on patients' outcomes. Accompanied by changes in immune cells and cytokines, there were consistencies, differences, and satisfactory correlations between patients with COVID-19 and those with cancers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Lymphopenia/blood , Monocytes/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Young Adult
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470886

ABSTRACT

During the last decade, we have persistently addressed the question, "how can the innate immune system be used as a therapeutic tool to eliminate cancer?" A cancerous tumor harbors innate immune cells such as macrophages, which are held in the tumor-promoting M2 state by tumor-cell-released cytokines. We have discovered that these tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are repolarized into the nitric oxide (NO)-generating tumoricidal M1 state by the dietary agent curcumin (CC), which also causes recruitment of activated natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T (Tc) cells into the tumor, thereby eliminating cancer cells as well as cancer stem cells. Indications are that this process may be NO-dependent. Intriguingly, the maximum blood concentration of CC in mice never exceeds nanomolar levels. Thus, our results submit that even low, transient levels of curcumin in vivo are enough to cause repolarization of the TAM and recruitment NK cells as well as Tc cells to eliminate the tumor. We have observed this phenomenon in two cancer models, glioblastoma and cervical cancer. Therefore, this approach may yield a general strategy to fight cancer. Our mechanistic studies have so far implicated induction of STAT-1 in this M2→M1 switch, but further studies are needed to understand the involvement of other factors such as the lipid metabolites resolvins in the CC-evoked anticancer pathways.


Subject(s)
Curcumin/therapeutic use , Glioblastoma/drug therapy , Neoplasms, Experimental/drug therapy , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/drug therapy , Animals , Female , Glioblastoma/immunology , Glioblastoma/pathology , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Mice , Neoplasms, Experimental/immunology , Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology , Nitric Oxide/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/pathology , Tumor-Associated Macrophages/immunology , Tumor-Associated Macrophages/pathology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/immunology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/pathology
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463713

ABSTRACT

We report a lymphoma patient with profound B-cell deficiency after chemotherapy combined with anti-CD20 antibody successfully treated with remdesivir and convalescent plasma for prolonged SARS-CoV-2 infection. Viral clearance was likely attributed to the robust expansion and activation of TCR Vß2 CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and CD16 + CD56- NK cells. This is the first presentation of TCR-specific T cell oligoclonal response in COVID-19. Our study suggests that B-cell depleted patients may effectively respond to anti-SARS-CoV-2 treatment when NK and antigen-specific Tc cell response is induced.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunization, Passive , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 705646, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450806

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a disease with a spectrum of clinical responses ranging from moderate to critical. To study and control its effects, a large number of researchers are focused on two substantial aims. On the one hand, the discovery of diverse biomarkers to classify and potentially anticipate the disease severity of patients. These biomarkers could serve as a medical criterion to prioritize attention to those patients with higher prone to severe responses. On the other hand, understanding how the immune system orchestrates its responses in this spectrum of disease severities is a fundamental issue required to design new and optimized therapeutic strategies. In this work, using single-cell RNAseq of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of nine patients with COVID-19 and three healthy controls, we contribute to both aspects. First, we presented computational supervised machine-learning models with high accuracy in classifying the disease severity (moderate and severe) in patients with COVID-19 starting from single-cell data from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Second, we identified regulatory mechanisms from the heterogeneous cell populations in the lungs microenvironment that correlated with different clinical responses. Given the results, patients with moderate COVID-19 symptoms showed an activation/inactivation profile for their analyzed cells leading to a sequential and innocuous immune response. In comparison, severe patients might be promoting cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory responses in a systemic fashion involving epithelial and immune cells without the possibility to develop viral clearance and immune memory. Consequently, we present an in-depth landscape analysis of how transcriptional factors and pathways from these heterogeneous populations can regulate their expression to promote or restrain an effective immune response directly linked to the patients prognosis.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Lung/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Biomarkers , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lung/chemistry , Machine Learning , Macrophages/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
9.
Immunity ; 54(11): 2650-2669.e14, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442406

ABSTRACT

Longitudinal analyses of the innate immune system, including the earliest time points, are essential to understand the immunopathogenesis and clinical course of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Here, we performed a detailed characterization of natural killer (NK) cells in 205 patients (403 samples; days 2 to 41 after symptom onset) from four independent cohorts using single-cell transcriptomics and proteomics together with functional studies. We found elevated interferon (IFN)-α plasma levels in early severe COVD-19 alongside increased NK cell expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and genes involved in IFN-α signaling, while upregulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced genes was observed in moderate diseases. NK cells exert anti-SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) activity but are functionally impaired in severe COVID-19. Further, NK cell dysfunction may be relevant for the development of fibrotic lung disease in severe COVID-19, as NK cells exhibited impaired anti-fibrotic activity. Our study indicates preferential IFN-α and TNF responses in severe and moderate COVID-19, respectively, and associates a prolonged IFN-α-induced NK cell response with poorer disease outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Base Sequence , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Interferon-alpha/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , RNA-Seq , Severity of Illness Index , Transcriptome/genetics , United Kingdom , United States
10.
Scand J Immunol ; 94(5): e13102, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434833

ABSTRACT

During COVID-19 infection, reduced function of natural killer (NK) cells can lead to both compromised viral clearance and dysregulation of the immune response. Such dysregulation leads to overproduction of cytokines, a raised neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and monocytosis. This in turn increases IL-6 expression, which promotes scar and thrombus formation. Excess IL-6 also leads to a further reduction in NK function through downregulation of perforin expression, therefore forming a pathogenic auto-inflammatory feedback loop. The perforin/granzyme system of cytotoxicity is the main mechanism through which NK cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes eliminate virally infected host cells, as well as being central to their role in regulating immune responses to microbial infection. Here, we present epidemiological evidence suggesting an association between perforin expression and resistance to COVID-19. In addition, we outline the manner in which a pathogenic auto-inflammatory feedback loop could operate and the relationship of this loop to genes associated with severe COVID-19. Such an auto-inflammatory loop may be amenable to synergistic multimodal therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Perforin/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Autoimmunity/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/epidemiology , Disease Resistance , Humans , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/epidemiology , Perforin/genetics
11.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5376, 2021 09 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402068

ABSTRACT

Natural killer (NK) cells are important early responders against viral infections. Changes in metabolism are crucial to fuel NK cell responses, and altered metabolism is linked to NK cell dysfunction in obesity and cancer. However, very little is known about the metabolic requirements of NK cells during acute retroviral infection and their importance for antiviral immunity. Here, using the Friend retrovirus mouse model, we show that following infection NK cells increase nutrient uptake, including amino acids and iron, and reprogram their metabolic machinery by increasing glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism. Specific deletion of the amino acid transporter Slc7a5 has only discrete effects on NK cells, but iron deficiency profoundly impaires NK cell antiviral functions, leading to increased viral loads. Our study thus shows the requirement of nutrients and metabolism for the antiviral activity of NK cells, and has important implications for viral infections associated with altered iron levels such as HIV and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Retroviridae Infections/immunology , Animals , Bone Marrow , COVID-19 , Cytokines , HIV , HIV Infections , Large Neutral Amino Acid-Transporter 1/genetics , Large Neutral Amino Acid-Transporter 1/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mitochondria , Retroviridae , Retroviridae Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 722979, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399139

ABSTRACT

The immunopathology of type I diabetes (T1D) presents a complicated case in part because of the multifactorial origin of this disease. Typically, T1D is thought to occur as a result of autoimmunity toward islets of Langerhans, resulting in the destruction of insulin-producing cells (ß cells) and thus lifelong reliance on exogenous insulin. However, that explanation obscures much of the underlying mechanism, and the actual precipitating events along with the associated actors (latent viral infection, diverse immune cell types and their roles) are not completely understood. Notably, there is a malfunctioning in the regulation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells that target endocrine cells through antigen-mediated attack. Further examination has revealed the likelihood of an imbalance in distinct subpopulations of tolerogenic and cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cells that may be the catalyst of adaptive immune system malfunction. The contributions of components outside the immune system, including environmental factors such as chronic viral infection also need more consideration, and much of the recent literature investigating the origins of this disease have focused on these factors. In this review, the details of the immunopathology of T1D regarding NK cell disfunction is discussed, along with how those mechanisms stand within the context of general autoimmune disorders. Finally, the rarer cases of latent autoimmune, COVID-19 (viral), and immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) induced diabetes are discussed as their exceptional pathology offers insight into the evolution of the disease as a whole.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Autoantibodies/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/etiology , Humans , Insulin/metabolism , Insulin-Secreting Cells/immunology , Virus Diseases/complications
13.
Mol Syst Biol ; 17(9): e10243, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395372

ABSTRACT

Systems serology provides a broad view of humoral immunity by profiling both the antigen-binding and Fc properties of antibodies. These studies contain structured biophysical profiling across disease-relevant antigen targets, alongside additional measurements made for single antigens or in an antigen-generic manner. Identifying patterns in these measurements helps guide vaccine and therapeutic antibody development, improve our understanding of diseases, and discover conserved regulatory mechanisms. Here, we report that coupled matrix-tensor factorization (CMTF) can reduce these data into consistent patterns by recognizing the intrinsic structure of these data. We use measurements from two previous studies of HIV- and SARS-CoV-2-infected subjects as examples. CMTF outperforms standard methods like principal components analysis in the extent of data reduction while maintaining equivalent prediction of immune functional responses and disease status. Under CMTF, model interpretation improves through effective data reduction, separation of the Fc and antigen-binding effects, and recognition of consistent patterns across individual measurements. Data reduction also helps make prediction models more replicable. Therefore, we propose that CMTF is an effective general strategy for data exploration in systems serology.


Subject(s)
AIDS Serodiagnosis , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/immunology , Data Interpretation, Statistical , HIV Infections/immunology , AIDS Serodiagnosis/methods , AIDS Serodiagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19 Serological Testing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Logistic Models , Receptors, Fc/immunology , Receptors, IgG/immunology
14.
Immunity ; 54(4): 753-768.e5, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385739

ABSTRACT

Viral infections induce a conserved host response distinct from bacterial infections. We hypothesized that the conserved response is associated with disease severity and is distinct between patients with different outcomes. To test this, we integrated 4,780 blood transcriptome profiles from patients aged 0 to 90 years infected with one of 16 viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, Ebola, chikungunya, and influenza, across 34 cohorts from 18 countries, and single-cell RNA sequencing profiles of 702,970 immune cells from 289 samples across three cohorts. Severe viral infection was associated with increased hematopoiesis, myelopoiesis, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We identified protective and detrimental gene modules that defined distinct trajectories associated with mild versus severe outcomes. The interferon response was decoupled from the protective host response in patients with severe outcomes. These findings were consistent, irrespective of age and virus, and provide insights to accelerate the development of diagnostics and host-directed therapies to improve global pandemic preparedness.


Subject(s)
Immunity/genetics , Virus Diseases/immunology , Antigen Presentation/genetics , Cohort Studies , Hematopoiesis/genetics , Humans , Interferons/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Myeloid Cells/pathology , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index , Systems Biology , Transcriptome , Virus Diseases/blood , Virus Diseases/classification , Virus Diseases/genetics , Viruses/classification , Viruses/pathogenicity
16.
Front Immunol ; 12: 721738, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378191

ABSTRACT

Here, we described the case of a B cell-deficient patient after CD19 CAR-T cell therapy for refractory B cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with protracted coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). For weeks, this patient only inefficiently contained the virus while convalescent plasma transfusion correlated with virus clearance. Interestingly, following convalescent plasma therapy natural killer cells matured and virus-specific T cells expanded, presumably allowing virus clearance and recovery from the disease. Our findings, thus, suggest that convalescent plasma therapy can activate cellular immune responses to clear SARS-CoV-2 infections. If confirmed in larger clinical studies, these data could be of general importance for the treatment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/immunology , Immunotherapy, Adoptive , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/complications , Lymphocyte Activation , Lymphopoiesis , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load
17.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374306

ABSTRACT

The cellular immune response plays an important role in COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2. This feature makes use of in vitro models' useful tools to evaluate vaccines and biopharmaceutical effects. Here, we developed a two-step model to evaluate the cellular immune response after SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced or spike protein stimulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both unexposed and COVID-19 (primo-infected) individuals (Step1). Moreover, the supernatants of these cultures were used to evaluate its effects on lung cell lines (A549) (Step2). When PBMC from the unexposed were infected by SARS-CoV-2, cytotoxic natural killer and nonclassical monocytes expressing inflammatory cytokines genes were raised. The supernatant of these cells can induce apoptosis of A549 cells (mock vs. Step2 [mean]: 6.4% × 17.7%). Meanwhile, PBMCs from primo-infected presented their memory CD4+ T cells activated with a high production of IFNG and antiviral genes. Supernatant from past COVID-19 subjects contributed to reduce apoptosis (mock vs. Step2 [ratio]: 7.2 × 1.4) and to elevate the antiviral activity (iNOS) of A549 cells (mock vs. Step2 [mean]: 31.5% × 55.7%). Our findings showed features of immune primary cells and lung cell lines response after SARS-CoV-2 or spike protein stimulation that can be used as an in vitro model to study the immunity effects after SARS-CoV-2 antigen exposure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Immunity, Cellular , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/genetics , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Virus Replication/physiology , Young Adult
18.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4854, 2021 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354099

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) presents with fever, inflammation and pathology of multiple organs in individuals under 21 years of age in the weeks following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Although an autoimmune pathogenesis has been proposed, the genes, pathways and cell types causal to this new disease remain unknown. Here we perform RNA sequencing of blood from patients with MIS-C and controls to find disease-associated genes clustered in a co-expression module annotated to CD56dimCD57+ natural killer (NK) cells and exhausted CD8+ T cells. A similar transcriptome signature is replicated in an independent cohort of Kawasaki disease (KD), the related condition after which MIS-C was initially named. Probing a probabilistic causal network previously constructed from over 1,000 blood transcriptomes both validates the structure of this module and reveals nine key regulators, including TBX21, a central coordinator of exhausted CD8+ T cell differentiation. Together, this unbiased, transcriptome-wide survey implicates downregulation of NK cells and cytotoxic T cell exhaustion in the pathogenesis of MIS-C.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Transcriptome/immunology , Adolescent , CD56 Antigen/metabolism , CD57 Antigens/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , Child , Child, Preschool , Down-Regulation , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/genetics , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/genetics , Young Adult
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 652223, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348483

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is highly contagious and presents a significant public health issue. Current therapies used to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) include monoclonal antibody cocktail, convalescent plasma, antivirals, immunomodulators, and anticoagulants. The vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna have recently been authorized for emergency use, which are invaluable for the prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, their long-term side effects are not yet documented, and populations with immunocompromised conditions (e.g., organ-transplantation and immunodeficient patients) may not be able to mount an effective immune response. In addition, there are concerns that wide-scale immunity to SARS-CoV-2 may introduce immune pressure that could select for escape mutants to the existing vaccines and monoclonal antibody therapies. Emerging evidence has shown that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)- natural killer (NK) immunotherapy has potent antitumor response in hematologic cancers with minimal adverse effects in recent studies, however, the potentials of CAR-NK cells in treating COVID-19 has not yet been fully exploited. Here, we improve upon a novel approach for the generation of CAR-NK cells for targeting SARS-CoV-2 and its various mutants. CAR-NK cells were generated using the scFv domain of S309 (henceforward, S309-CAR-NK), a SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody (NAbs) that targets the highly conserved region of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) glycoprotein and is therefore more likely to recognize different variants of SARS-CoV-2 isolates. S309-CAR-NK cells can specifically bind to pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2 virus and its D614G, N501Y, and E484K mutants. Furthermore, S309-CAR-NK cells can specifically kill target cells expressing SARS-CoV-2 S protein in vitro and show superior killing activity and cytokine production, compared to that of the recently reported CR3022-CAR-NK cells. Thus, these results pave the way for generating 'off-the-shelf' S309-CAR-NK cells for treatment in high-risk individuals as well as provide an alternative strategy for patients unresponsive to current vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , A549 Cells , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
20.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(15): 5057-5062, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346860

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Complete blood count parameters are frequently altered in COVID-19 patients. Leucopenia and lymphopenia are the most common findings. This is not specific to COVID-19 as similar alterations are found in various other viral infections. This work is intended to summarize the evidence regarding white blood cell and lymphocyte subset alterations in COVID-19 and their clinical implications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A PubMed search was conducted to identify relevant original studies. Articles not available in English or referring exclusively to pediatric patients were excluded. The study was designed as a narrative review from its inception. RESULTS: Complete white blood cell number and lymphocytes may be reduced in COVID-19 patients. Circulating CD4+ cells (helper T lymphocytes), CD8+ cells (cytotoxic T lymphocytes), regulatory T cells and natural killer (NK) cells may be reduced, with a greater reduction observed in critically ill patients. CD4+ and regulatory cell deficiencies may contribute to the cytokine storm and subsequent tissue damage observed in severe COVID-19 infection. NK and CD8+ cell deficiency might delay infection clearance. These aberrations of cellular immunity may contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of the disease. Alterations observed in monocyte function can also be implicated as they are effector cells responsible for tissue damage and remodeling. B cell dysfunction and maturation abnormalities have also been reported, suggesting that the virus also impairs humoral immunity. CONCLUSIONS: Lymphocyte subset abnormalities may be useful prognostic biomarkers for COVID-19, with circulating CD8+ cell count being the most promising as a predictor of severe disease requiring mechanical ventilation and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Lymphocyte Subsets/virology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/virology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/virology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/virology
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