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1.
Am J Case Rep ; 23: e936498, 2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957594

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Multi-resistant microorganisms are a public health problem. Their incidence has risen due to COVID-19, indiscriminate antibiotics use, corticosteroid treatments, and higher admissions to intensive care units (ICUs) of patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. These are risk factors for bacterial over-infection. The present case study that is relevant because of the multiple isolated strains with a resistance pattern: Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC), extended-spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL) and New Delhi metallo-ß-lactamase (NDM) in a patient without comorbidities. CASE REPORT A 53-year-old Ecuadorian man with no past medical history arrived at the Emergency Department (ED) with dyspnea, nasopharyngeal swab with a positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for SARS-CoV2, and a chest computed tomography (CT) scan showing bilateral ground-glass pulmonary infiltrates with 40% involvement. On day 10 in the ICU, the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae KPC strain was reported in an axillary swab culture. Consequently, the antibiotic was rotated to vancomycin 1 g intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h and meropenem 1 g i.v. every 8 h. On day 15 in the ICU, a tracheal secretion culture was reported with the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae ESBL and a blood culture with Klebsiella pneumoniae NDM. CONCLUSIONS The COVID-19 pandemic is a perfect scenario for superinfection with multi-resistant pathogens such as carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP), due to the increase in patients admitted to ICUs requiring invasive mechanical ventilation, the use of corticosteroids, and empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic management based on guidelines. The emergence of combined multidrug-resistant strains is a challenge for laboratory detection and the selection of antimicrobial treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Klebsiella Infections , Pneumonia , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Ecuador , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Klebsiella Infections/diagnosis , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Male , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Pandemics , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Rev Esp Quimioter ; 35(1): 80-83, 2022 Feb.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1609053

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We carry out an analysis of the bacteremia diagnosed in the Emergency Department during 2020, coinciding with the period of the pandemic. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis from March 4, 2020 to December 31, 2020. RESULTS: The number of patients who went to the Emergency Department during the study period and the number of extracted blood cultures decreased by 46.79% and 35.7% compared to the same period in 2019 (p <0.05). 320 bacteremia occurred while 507 occurred in 2019, assuming a decrease of 36.8% (p <0.05). The positivity rate of blood cultures was 7.09% in 2020 and 7.23% in 2019 and the contamination rate was 7.07 % in 2020 and 5.67% in 2019. The most frequently isolated microorganism was Escherichia coli, followed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. A 6.62% of the isolated E. coli were carriers of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL). The percentage of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was 12.9 % and that of K. pneumoniae ESBL was 11.54%. CONCLUSIONS: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic there has been a decrease in the number of bacteremia diagnoses, it is possible that attention was focused especially on COVID, forgetting other diseases, such as bacteremia.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia , COVID-19 , Escherichia coli Infections , Klebsiella Infections , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteremia/diagnosis , Bacteremia/drug therapy , Bacteremia/epidemiology , Escherichia coli , Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers , beta-Lactamases
4.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 41(3): 495-500, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603573

ABSTRACT

The objective was to study ceftazidime-avibactam resistant and susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from a patient admitted to the Policlinico Umberto I of Rome for SARS-CoV2. Data on the evolution of patient's conditions, antimicrobial therapies, and microbiological data were collected. Whole-genome sequencing performed by Illumina and Nanopore sequencing methods were used to type the strains. During the hospitalization, a SARS-CoV2-infected patient was colonized by a KPC-producing K. pneumoniae strain and empirically treated with ceftazidime-avibactam (CZA) when presenting spiking fever symptoms. Successively, ST2502 CZA-resistant strain producing the KPC-31 variant gave a pulmonary infection to the patient. The infection was treated with high doses of meropenem. The KPC-31-producing strain disappeared but the patient remained colonized by a KPC-3-producing K. pneumoniae strain. An interplay between highly conserved KPC-31- and KPC-3-producing ST2502 strains occurred in the SARS-CoV2 patient during the hospitalization, selected by CZA and carbapenem treatments, respectively.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents , COVID-19 , Klebsiella Infections , Meropenem , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , COVID-19/complications , Ceftazidime/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae/genetics , Meropenem/therapeutic use , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , beta-Lactamases/genetics
5.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 2347872, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582891

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at risk for superadded infections, especially infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogens. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the prevalence of MDR infections, including infections caused by MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), was very high in Iran. This study is aimed at assessing the genetic diversity, antimicrobial resistance pattern, and biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae isolates obtained from patients with COVID-19 and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) hospitalized in an intensive care unit (ICU) in Iran. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, seventy K. pneumoniae isolates were obtained from seventy patients with COVID-19 hospitalized in the ICU of Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran, from May to September, 2020. K. pneumoniae was detected through the ureD gene. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method, and biofilm was detected using the microtiter plate assay method. Genetic diversity was also analyzed through polymerase chain reaction based on enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR). The BioNumerics software (v. 8.0, Applied Maths, Belgium) was used for analyzing the data and drawing dendrogram and minimum spanning tree. Findings. K. pneumoniae isolates had varying levels of resistance to antibiotics meropenem (80.4%), cefepime-aztreonam-piperacillin/tazobactam (70%), tobramycin (61.4%), ciprofloxacin (57.7%), gentamicin (55.7%), and imipenem (50%). Around 77.14% of isolates were MDR, and 42.8% of them formed biofilm. Genetic diversity analysis revealed 28 genotypes (E1-E28) and 74.28% of isolates were grouped into ten clusters (i.e., clusters A-J). Clusters were further categorized into three major clusters, i.e., clusters E, H, and J. Antimicrobial resistance to meropenem, tobramycin, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin in cluster J was significantly higher than cluster H, denoting significant relationship between ERIC clusters and antimicrobial resistance. However, there was no significant difference among major clusters E, H, and J respecting biofilm formation. CONCLUSION: K. pneumoniae isolates obtained from patients with COVID-19 have high antimicrobial resistance, and 44.2% of them have genetic similarity and can be clustered in three major clusters. There is a significant difference among clusters respecting antimicrobial resistance.


Subject(s)
Biofilms/growth & development , COVID-19/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/genetics , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/microbiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Biofilms/drug effects , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Iran , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Microbial Sensitivity Tests/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/virology
6.
Retina ; 41(8): 1709-1714, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503647

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe endogenous endophthalmitis in the setting of COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: Patients recovering from COVID-19 pneumonia who presented to our department with any or all of the following complaints: pain, watering, redness, and decreased vision were identified. All relevant data were collected for analysis. RESULTS: Three patients with endogenous endophthalmitis were identified. All patients had been treated for COVID-19 pneumonia and therefore had received remdesivir and systemic steroids; 2 of the 3 patients received tocilizumab. All patients received vitreous biopsy, vitrectomy, and intraocular antibiotic injection. Patient 1 demonstrated Klebsiella pneumoniae in blood culture, K. pneumoniae and Escherichia coli in urine culture, and K. pneumoniae in vitreous fluid, whereas Patients 2 and 3 demonstrated Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the blood and nasopharyngeal culture, respectively. Correspondingly, the same organism was cultured from vitreous in Patients 2 and 3. The visual acuity at the last follow-up in Patients 1 to 3 was 20/100, 20/80, and 20/40, respectively. The probable source of infection was identified in each as renal calculi, dental caries, and the pharynx, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated the presence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in the vitreous fluid of Patient 1. CONCLUSION: We report good outcomes of early intervention for endogenous endophthalmitis in the setting of COVID-19 infection. We also document the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in vitreous.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Endophthalmitis/microbiology , Eye Infections, Bacterial/microbiology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/isolation & purification , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stenotrophomonas maltophilia/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Endophthalmitis/diagnosis , Endophthalmitis/drug therapy , Eye Infections, Bacterial/diagnosis , Eye Infections, Bacterial/drug therapy , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/diagnosis , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Male , Middle Aged , Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Vitrectomy , Vitreous Body/microbiology , Vitreous Body/virology
7.
Microb Drug Resist ; 27(9): 1167-1175, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406451

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to assess the drivers of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infection development in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its impact on patient outcome. Methods: Retrospective analysis on data from 32 consecutive patients with COVID-19, admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) from March to May 2020. Outcomes considered were MDR infection and ICU mortality. Results: Fifty percent of patients developed an MDR infection during ICU stay after a median time of 8 [4-11] days. Most common MDR pathogens were carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii, causing bloodstream infections and pneumonia. MDR infections were linked to a higher length of ICU stay (p = 0.002), steroid therapy (p = 0.011), and associated with a lower ICU mortality (odds ratio: 0.439, 95% confidence interval: 0.251-0.763; p < 0.001). Low-dose aspirin intake was associated with both MDR infection (p = 0.043) and survival (p = 0.015). Among MDR patients, mortality was related with piperacillin-tazobactam use (p = 0.035) and an earlier onset of MDR infection (p = 0.042). Conclusions: MDR infections were a common complication in critically ill COVID-19 patients at our center. MDR risk was higher among those dwelling longer in the ICU and receiving steroids. However, MDR infections were not associated with a worse outcome.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter Infections/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Klebsiella Infections/mortality , Opportunistic Infections/mortality , Pneumonia/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Acinetobacter Infections/drug therapy , Acinetobacter Infections/microbiology , Acinetobacter Infections/virology , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Acinetobacter baumannii/growth & development , Acinetobacter baumannii/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Carbapenems/therapeutic use , Critical Illness , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella Infections/virology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/growth & development , Klebsiella pneumoniae/pathogenicity , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Piperacillin, Tazobactam Drug Combination/therapeutic use , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Steroids/therapeutic use , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
8.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(4)2021 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197249

ABSTRACT

A 35-year-old Hispanic man presented with fever, chills, dysuria, diarrhoea, scleral icterus, tachycardia and tachypnea. He was found to be COVID-19 positive, CT of the pelvis revealed prostatic abscess, and urine culture grew Klebsiella pneumoniae Additionally, he was found to have diabetes and cirrhosis. During treatment, the patient developed vision loss, and was diagnosed with endogenous Klebsiella endophthalmitis. The patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics, pars plana vitrectomy, intravitreal antibiotics and cystoscopy/suprapubic catheter placement. On follow-up, the patient has had the suprapubic catheter removed, and successfully passed a voiding trial, but suffers permanent vision loss in both eyes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Endophthalmitis , Klebsiella Infections , Prostatitis , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Blindness , COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Endophthalmitis/complications , Endophthalmitis/diagnosis , Endophthalmitis/therapy , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/complications , Klebsiella Infections/diagnosis , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/virology , Male , Prostatitis/complications , Prostatitis/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitrectomy
9.
Retina ; 41(8): 1709-1714, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140026

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe endogenous endophthalmitis in the setting of COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: Patients recovering from COVID-19 pneumonia who presented to our department with any or all of the following complaints: pain, watering, redness, and decreased vision were identified. All relevant data were collected for analysis. RESULTS: Three patients with endogenous endophthalmitis were identified. All patients had been treated for COVID-19 pneumonia and therefore had received remdesivir and systemic steroids; 2 of the 3 patients received tocilizumab. All patients received vitreous biopsy, vitrectomy, and intraocular antibiotic injection. Patient 1 demonstrated Klebsiella pneumoniae in blood culture, K. pneumoniae and Escherichia coli in urine culture, and K. pneumoniae in vitreous fluid, whereas Patients 2 and 3 demonstrated Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the blood and nasopharyngeal culture, respectively. Correspondingly, the same organism was cultured from vitreous in Patients 2 and 3. The visual acuity at the last follow-up in Patients 1 to 3 was 20/100, 20/80, and 20/40, respectively. The probable source of infection was identified in each as renal calculi, dental caries, and the pharynx, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated the presence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in the vitreous fluid of Patient 1. CONCLUSION: We report good outcomes of early intervention for endogenous endophthalmitis in the setting of COVID-19 infection. We also document the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in vitreous.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Endophthalmitis/microbiology , Eye Infections, Bacterial/microbiology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/isolation & purification , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stenotrophomonas maltophilia/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Endophthalmitis/diagnosis , Endophthalmitis/drug therapy , Eye Infections, Bacterial/diagnosis , Eye Infections, Bacterial/drug therapy , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/diagnosis , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Male , Middle Aged , Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Vitrectomy , Vitreous Body/microbiology , Vitreous Body/virology
11.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(1): 50-52, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065349

ABSTRACT

The impact of secondary infections by multidrug-resistant bacteria in COVID-19- infected patients has yet to be evaluated. Here, we report the clinical and molecular features of an outbreak of seven patients carrying CTX-M-15- and OXA-48-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae belonging to ST326 during COVID-19 pandemic in an ICU in northern Spain. Those patients were admitted to beds close to each other, two of them developed ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), one exhibited primary bacteremia and the remaining four were considered to be colonized. None of them was colonized prior to admission to the ICU an all, except one of those who developed VAP, were discharged. Hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir were administered to all of them as COVID-19 therapy and additionally, three of them received tocilizumab and corticosteroids, respectively. Reusing of personal protective equipment due to its initial shortage, relaxation in infection control measures and negative-pressure air in ICU rooms recommended for the protection of health care workers (HCWs), could have contributed to this outbreak. Maximization of infection control measures is essential to avoid secondary infections by MDR bacteria in COVID-infected patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cross Infection/diagnosis , Klebsiella Infections/diagnosis , Klebsiella pneumoniae/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Cross Infection/complications , Cross Infection/drug therapy , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Klebsiella Infections/complications , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Male , Spain , beta-Lactamases/metabolism
12.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(4): 859-869, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-898040

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide. Bacterial co-infections are associated with unfavourable outcomes in respiratory viral infections; however, microbiological and antibiotic data related to COVID-19 are sparse. Adequate use of antibiotics in line with antibiotic stewardship (ABS) principles is warranted during the pandemic. We performed a retrospective study of clinical and microbiological characteristics of 140 COVID-19 patients admitted between February and April 2020 to a German University hospital, with a focus on bacterial co-infections and antimicrobial therapy. The final date of follow-up was 6 May 2020. Clinical data of 140 COVID-19 patients were recorded: The median age was 63.5 (range 17-99) years; 64% were males. According to the implemented local ABS guidelines, the most commonly used antibiotic regimen was ampicillin/sulbactam (41.5%) with a median duration of 6 (range 1-13) days. Urinary antigen tests for Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus peumoniae were negative in all cases. In critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (n = 50), co-infections with Enterobacterales (34.0%) and Aspergillus fumigatus (18.0%) were detected. Blood cultures collected at admission showed a diagnostic yield of 4.2%. Bacterial and fungal co-infections are rare in COVID-19 patients and are mainly prevalent in critically ill patients. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of antimicrobial therapy on therapeutic outcome in COVID-19 patients to prevent antimicrobial overuse. ABS guidelines could help in optimising the management of COVID-19. Investigation of microbial patterns of infectious complications in critically ill COVID-19 patients is also required.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ampicillin/therapeutic use , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Aspergillosis/epidemiology , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Cohort Studies , Coinfection/epidemiology , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/drug therapy , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/epidemiology , Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy , Escherichia coli Infections/epidemiology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella Infections/epidemiology , Linezolid/therapeutic use , Male , Meropenem/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Piperacillin, Tazobactam Drug Combination/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcal Infections/epidemiology , Streptococcal Infections/drug therapy , Streptococcal Infections/epidemiology , Sulbactam/therapeutic use , Vancomycin/therapeutic use , Young Adult
13.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 161: 936-938, 2020 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593423

ABSTRACT

This short report is dedicated to the description of the wide antiviral and antibacterial activity of the immune-modulating agent Panavir®. Panavir® is a high-molecular-weight fraction of the polysaccharides extracted from the shoots of the Solanum tuberosum. It demonstrates activity against many types of viruses, including animal coronavirus and also against bacterial infections. These properties look very promising considering the COVID-19 epidemy and allow propose that Panavir® would be effective in the therapy of the SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Glycosides/pharmacology , Herpes Genitalis/drug therapy , Adult , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Dysentery, Bacillary/drug therapy , Female , Glycosides/chemistry , Glycosides/therapeutic use , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Male , Mice , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Shigella flexneri/drug effects , Young Adult
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