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1.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 2347872, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582891

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at risk for superadded infections, especially infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogens. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the prevalence of MDR infections, including infections caused by MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), was very high in Iran. This study is aimed at assessing the genetic diversity, antimicrobial resistance pattern, and biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae isolates obtained from patients with COVID-19 and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) hospitalized in an intensive care unit (ICU) in Iran. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, seventy K. pneumoniae isolates were obtained from seventy patients with COVID-19 hospitalized in the ICU of Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran, from May to September, 2020. K. pneumoniae was detected through the ureD gene. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method, and biofilm was detected using the microtiter plate assay method. Genetic diversity was also analyzed through polymerase chain reaction based on enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR). The BioNumerics software (v. 8.0, Applied Maths, Belgium) was used for analyzing the data and drawing dendrogram and minimum spanning tree. Findings. K. pneumoniae isolates had varying levels of resistance to antibiotics meropenem (80.4%), cefepime-aztreonam-piperacillin/tazobactam (70%), tobramycin (61.4%), ciprofloxacin (57.7%), gentamicin (55.7%), and imipenem (50%). Around 77.14% of isolates were MDR, and 42.8% of them formed biofilm. Genetic diversity analysis revealed 28 genotypes (E1-E28) and 74.28% of isolates were grouped into ten clusters (i.e., clusters A-J). Clusters were further categorized into three major clusters, i.e., clusters E, H, and J. Antimicrobial resistance to meropenem, tobramycin, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin in cluster J was significantly higher than cluster H, denoting significant relationship between ERIC clusters and antimicrobial resistance. However, there was no significant difference among major clusters E, H, and J respecting biofilm formation. CONCLUSION: K. pneumoniae isolates obtained from patients with COVID-19 have high antimicrobial resistance, and 44.2% of them have genetic similarity and can be clustered in three major clusters. There is a significant difference among clusters respecting antimicrobial resistance.


Subject(s)
Biofilms/growth & development , COVID-19/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/genetics , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/microbiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Biofilms/drug effects , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Iran , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Microbial Sensitivity Tests/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/virology
2.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(3): e0028321, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501550

ABSTRACT

The Infectious Disease Surveillance of Pediatrics (ISPED) program was established in 2015 to monitor and analyze the trends of bacterial epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in children. Clinical bacterial isolates were collected from 11 tertiary care children's hospitals in China in 2016 to 2020. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the Kirby-Bauer method or automated systems, with interpretation according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute 2019 breakpoints. A total of 288,377 isolates were collected, and the top 10 predominant bacteria were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic year, we observed a significant reduction in the proportion of respiratory tract samples (from 56.9% to 44.0%). A comparable reduction was also seen in the primary bacteria mainly isolated from respiratory tract samples, including S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and S. pyogenes. Multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) in children were commonly observed and presented higher rates of drug resistance than sensitive strains. The proportions of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (CRKP), carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB), carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA), and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were 19.7%, 46.4%%, 12.8%, and 35.0%, respectively. The proportions of CRKP, CRAB, and CRPA strains all showed decreasing trends between 2015 and 2020. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and CRPA gradually decreased with age, while CRAB showed the opposite trend with age. Both CRE and CRPA pose potential threats to neonates. MDROs show very high levels of AMR and have become an urgent threat to children, suggesting that effective monitoring of AMR and antimicrobial stewardship among children in China are required. IMPORTANCE AMR, especially that involving multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), is recognized as a global threat to human health; AMR renders infections increasingly difficult to treat, constituting an enormous economic burden and producing tremendous negative impacts on patient morbidity and mortality rates. There are many surveillance programs in the world to address AMR profiles and MDRO prevalence in humans. However, published studies evaluating the overall AMR rates or MDRO distributions in children are very limited or are of mixed quality. In this study, we showed the bacterial epidemiology and resistance profiles of primary pathogens in Chinese children from 2016 to 2020 for the first time, analyzed MDRO distributions with time and with age, and described MDROs' potential threats to children, especially low-immunity neonates. Our study will be very useful to guide antiinfection therapy in Chinese children, as well as worldwide pediatric patients.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/classification , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , China/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial/drug effects , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Humans , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Moraxella catarrhalis , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Staphylococcus epidermidis , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Streptococcus pyogenes
3.
Microb Drug Resist ; 27(9): 1167-1175, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406451

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to assess the drivers of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infection development in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its impact on patient outcome. Methods: Retrospective analysis on data from 32 consecutive patients with COVID-19, admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) from March to May 2020. Outcomes considered were MDR infection and ICU mortality. Results: Fifty percent of patients developed an MDR infection during ICU stay after a median time of 8 [4-11] days. Most common MDR pathogens were carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii, causing bloodstream infections and pneumonia. MDR infections were linked to a higher length of ICU stay (p = 0.002), steroid therapy (p = 0.011), and associated with a lower ICU mortality (odds ratio: 0.439, 95% confidence interval: 0.251-0.763; p < 0.001). Low-dose aspirin intake was associated with both MDR infection (p = 0.043) and survival (p = 0.015). Among MDR patients, mortality was related with piperacillin-tazobactam use (p = 0.035) and an earlier onset of MDR infection (p = 0.042). Conclusions: MDR infections were a common complication in critically ill COVID-19 patients at our center. MDR risk was higher among those dwelling longer in the ICU and receiving steroids. However, MDR infections were not associated with a worse outcome.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter Infections/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Klebsiella Infections/mortality , Opportunistic Infections/mortality , Pneumonia/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Acinetobacter Infections/drug therapy , Acinetobacter Infections/microbiology , Acinetobacter Infections/virology , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Acinetobacter baumannii/growth & development , Acinetobacter baumannii/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Carbapenems/therapeutic use , Critical Illness , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella Infections/virology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/growth & development , Klebsiella pneumoniae/pathogenicity , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Piperacillin, Tazobactam Drug Combination/therapeutic use , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Steroids/therapeutic use , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
4.
Foodborne Pathog Dis ; 18(2): 63-84, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-897127

ABSTRACT

Klebsiella pneumoniae is considered an opportunistic pathogen, constituting an ongoing health concern for immunocompromised patients, the elderly, and neonates. Reports on the isolation of K. pneumoniae from other sources are increasing, many of which express multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotypes. Three phylogroups were identified based on nucleotide differences. Niche environments, including plants, animals, and humans appear to be colonized by different phylogroups, among which KpI (K. pneumoniae) is commonly associated with human infection. Infections with K. pneumoniae can be transmitted through contaminated food or water and can be associated with community-acquired infections or between persons and animals involved in hospital-acquired infections. Increasing reports are describing detections along the food chain, suggesting the possibility exists that this could be a hitherto unexplored reservoir for this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. Expression of MDR phenotypes elaborated by these bacteria is due to the nature of various plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance (AMR)-encoding genes, and is a challenge to animal, environmental, and human health alike. Raman spectroscopy has the potential to provide for the rapid identification and screening of antimicrobial susceptibility of Klebsiella isolates. Moreover, hypervirulent isolates linked with extraintestinal infections express phenotypes that may support their niche adaptation. In this review, the prevalence, reservoirs, AMR, Raman spectroscopy detection, and pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae are summarized and various extraintestinal infection pathways are further narrated to extend our understanding of its adaptation and survival ability in reservoirs, and associated disease risks.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Zoonoses/microbiology , Disease Reservoirs/microbiology , Klebsiella Infections/epidemiology , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/pathogenicity , Aged , Animals , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Male , Phylogeny , Prevalence
5.
Genome Med ; 12(1): 113, 2020 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-964565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae are a major cause of hospital- and community-acquired infections, including sepsis, liver abscess, and pneumonia, driven mainly by the emergence of successful high-risk clonal lineages. The K. pneumoniae sequence type (ST) 307 lineage has appeared in several different parts of the world after first being described in Europe in 2008. From June to October 2019, we recorded an outbreak of an extensively drug-resistant ST307 lineage in four medical facilities in north-eastern Germany. METHODS: Here, we investigated these isolates and those from subsequent cases in the same facilities. We performed whole-genome sequencing to study phylogenetics, microevolution, and plasmid transmission, as well as phenotypic experiments including growth curves, hypermucoviscosity, siderophore secretion, biofilm formation, desiccation resilience, serum survival, and heavy metal resistance for an in-depth characterization of this outbreak clone. RESULTS: Phylogenetics suggest a homogenous phylogram with several sub-clades containing either isolates from only one patient or isolates originating from different patients, suggesting inter-patient transmission. We identified three large resistance plasmids, carrying either NDM-1, CTX-M-15, or OXA-48, which K. pneumoniae ST307 likely donated to other K. pneumoniae isolates of different STs and even other bacterial species (e.g., Enterobacter cloacae) within the clinical settings. Several chromosomally and plasmid-encoded, hypervirulence-associated virulence factors (e.g., yersiniabactin, metabolite transporter, aerobactin, and heavy metal resistance genes) were identified in addition. While growth, biofilm formation, desiccation resilience, serum survival, and heavy metal resistance were comparable to several control strains, results from siderophore secretion and hypermucoviscosity experiments revealed superiority of the ST307 clone, similar to an archetypical, hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strain (hvKP1). CONCLUSIONS: The combination of extensive drug resistance and virulence, partly conferred through a "mosaic" plasmid carrying both antibiotic resistance and hypervirulence-associated features, demonstrates serious public health implications.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial/genetics , Iron/metabolism , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/genetics , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Biofilms/growth & development , Disease Outbreaks , Genes, Bacterial/genetics , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/epidemiology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/classification , Klebsiella pneumoniae/growth & development , Phylogeny , Plasmids , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Virulence/drug effects , Virulence/genetics , Virulence Factors/genetics , Whole Genome Sequencing
6.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(14): 16084-16096, 2021 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164786

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 exemplifies, respiratory diseases transmitted through aerosols or droplets are global threats to public health, and respiratory protection measures are essential first lines of infection prevention and control. However, common face masks are single use and can cause cross-infection due to the accumulated infectious pathogens. We developed salt-based formulations to coat membrane fibers to fabricate antimicrobial filters. Here, we report a mechanistic study on salt-induced pathogen inactivation. The salt recrystallization following aerosol exposure was characterized over time on sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium sulfate (K2SO4), and potassium chloride (KCl) powders and coatings, which revealed that NaCl and KCl start to recrystallize within 5 min and K2SO4 within 15 min. The inactivation kinetics observed for the H1N1 influenza virus and Klebsiella pneumoniae matched the salt recrystallization well, which was identified as the main destabilizing mechanism. Additionally, the salt-coated filters were prepared with different methods (with and without a vacuum process), which led to salt coatings with different morphologies for diverse applications. Finally, the salt-coated filters caused a loss of pathogen viability independent of transmission mode (aerosols or droplets), against both DI water and artificial saliva suspensions. Overall, these findings increase our understanding of the salt-recrystallization-based technology to develop highly versatile antimicrobial filters.


Subject(s)
Filtration/instrumentation , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Masks , Potassium Chloride/chemistry , Sodium Chloride/chemistry , Sulfates/chemistry , Aerosols , Air Filters , Crystallization , Kinetics , Membranes, Artificial , Polypropylenes , Powders , Respiratory Protective Devices , Temperature , X-Ray Diffraction
7.
Lett Appl Microbiol ; 71(4): 405-412, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671045

ABSTRACT

Bacterial infection remains the main cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome and is a leading cause of death and disability in critically ill patients. Here we report on the use of purified ß-glucan (lentinan) extracts from Lentinus edodes (Shiitake) mushroom that can reduce infection by a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rodent pneumonia model, likely through immunomodulation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to intra-tracheal administration of K. pneumoniae to induce pulmonary sepsis and randomized to three groups; vehicle control (Vehicle, n = 12), commercial lentinan (CL, n = 8) or in-house extracted lentinan (IHL, n = 8) were administered intravenously 1 h postinfection. Physiological parameters and blood gas analysis were measured, bacterial counts from bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL) were determined, along with differential staining of white cells and measurement of protein concentration in BAL 48 h after pneumonia induction. Use of IHL extract significantly decreased BAL CFU counts. Both CL and IHL extractions reduced protein concentration in BAL. Use of IHL resulted in an improvement in physiological parameters compared to controls and CL. In conclusion, administration of lentinan to treat sepsis-induced lung injury appears safe and effective and may exert its effects in an immunomodulatory manner.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Lentinan/administration & dosage , Lung Diseases/drug therapy , Plant Extracts/administration & dosage , Sepsis/drug therapy , Shiitake Mushrooms/chemistry , beta-Glucans/administration & dosage , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Humans , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/physiology , Lentinan/chemistry , Lentinan/pharmacology , Lung Diseases/microbiology , Male , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Sepsis/microbiology
10.
IUBMB Life ; 72(10): 2097-2111, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696287

ABSTRACT

The pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has affected millions of people worldwide. To date, there are no proven effective therapies for this virus. Efforts made to develop antiviral strategies for the treatment of COVID-19 are underway. Respiratory viral infections, such as influenza, predispose patients to co-infections and these lead to increased disease severity and mortality. Numerous types of antibiotics such as azithromycin have been employed for the prevention and treatment of bacterial co-infection and secondary bacterial infections in patients with a viral respiratory infection (e.g., SARS-CoV-2). Although antibiotics do not directly affect SARS-CoV-2, viral respiratory infections often result in bacterial pneumonia. It is possible that some patients die from bacterial co-infection rather than virus itself. To date, a considerable number of bacterial strains have been resistant to various antibiotics such as azithromycin, and the overuse could render those or other antibiotics even less effective. Therefore, bacterial co-infection and secondary bacterial infection are considered critical risk factors for the severity and mortality rates of COVID-19. Also, the antibiotic-resistant as a result of overusing must be considered. In this review, we will summarize the bacterial co-infection and secondary bacterial infection in some featured respiratory viral infections, especially COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Bacterial/epidemiology , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Acinetobacter baumannii/pathogenicity , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection , Haemophilus influenzae/drug effects , Haemophilus influenzae/pathogenicity , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/pathogenicity , Legionella pneumophila/drug effects , Legionella pneumophila/pathogenicity , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/pathogenicity , Pneumonia, Bacterial/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Bacterial/microbiology , Pneumonia, Bacterial/virology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/pathogenicity , Respiratory System/drug effects , Respiratory System/microbiology , Respiratory System/pathology , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Streptococcus pneumoniae/drug effects , Streptococcus pneumoniae/pathogenicity , Streptococcus pyogenes/drug effects , Streptococcus pyogenes/pathogenicity
11.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 161: 936-938, 2020 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593423

ABSTRACT

This short report is dedicated to the description of the wide antiviral and antibacterial activity of the immune-modulating agent Panavir®. Panavir® is a high-molecular-weight fraction of the polysaccharides extracted from the shoots of the Solanum tuberosum. It demonstrates activity against many types of viruses, including animal coronavirus and also against bacterial infections. These properties look very promising considering the COVID-19 epidemy and allow propose that Panavir® would be effective in the therapy of the SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Glycosides/pharmacology , Herpes Genitalis/drug therapy , Adult , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Dysentery, Bacillary/drug therapy , Female , Glycosides/chemistry , Glycosides/therapeutic use , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Male , Mice , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Shigella flexneri/drug effects , Young Adult
12.
Emerg Top Life Sci ; 4(2): 129-136, 2020 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401775

ABSTRACT

As the Royal Society for Biology (RSB) was forming 10 years ago, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was being heralded as the next threat with a magnitude on a par with global warming. Just a few years later, in 2016, Jim O'Neill's report was published laying out recommendations for tackling drug-resistant infections globally. Where are we now, and what are the challenges ahead? As a slow burner, how will the impact of AMR compare against the recent rapid devastation of the COVID-19 pandemic, and how can we channel some of the good things that come from it (like the awareness and technique of effective hand hygiene) to help us combat AMR speedily and definitively?


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Drug Resistance, Bacterial/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Biofilms , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Infection Control , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
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