Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 53
Filter
3.
Anal Bioanal Chem ; 413(29): 7195-7204, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482198

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused severe harm to the health of people all around the world. Molecular detection of the pathogen, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), played a crucial role in the control of the disease. Reverse transcription digital PCR (RT-dPCR) has been developed and used in the detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA as an absolute quantification method. Here, an interlaboratory assessment of quantification of SARS-CoV-2 RNA was organized by the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIMC), using in vitro transcribed RNA samples, among ten laboratories on six different dPCR platforms. Copy number concentrations of three genes of SARS-CoV-2 were measured by all participants. Consistent results were obtained with dispersion within 2.2-fold and CV% below 23% among different dPCR platforms and laboratories, and Z' scores of all the reported results being satisfactory. Possible reasons for the dispersion included PCR assays, partition volume, and reverse transcription conditions. This study demonstrated the comparability and applicability of RT-dPCR method for quantification of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and showed the capability of the participating laboratories at SARS-CoV-2 test by RT-dPCR platform.


Subject(s)
Laboratories/organization & administration , RNA, Viral/analysis , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Limit of Detection
5.
Infect Dis Clin North Am ; 35(3): 789-802, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340083

ABSTRACT

A great clinical microbiology laboratory supporting a great infection prevention program requires focusing on the following services: rapid and accurate identification of pathogens associated with health care-associated infections; asymptomatic surveillance for health care-acquired pathogens before infections arise; routine use of broad and flexible antimicrobial susceptibility testing to direct optimal therapy; implementation of epidemiologic tracking tools to identify outbreaks; development of clear result communication with interpretative comments for clinicians. These goals are best realized in a collaborative relationship with the infection prevention program so that both can benefit from the shared priorities of providing the best patient care.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Laboratories, Hospital , Bacterial Infections/transmission , Humans , Laboratories/organization & administration
7.
Cytometry A ; 97(9): 882-886, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384154

ABSTRACT

Operating shared resource laboratories (SRLs) in times of pandemic is a challenge for research institutions. In a multiuser, high-turnover working space, the transmission of infectious agents is difficult to control. To address this challenge, imaging core facility managers being members of German BioImaging discussed how shared microscopes could be operated with minimal risk of spreading SARS-CoV-2 between users and staff. Here, we describe the resulting guidelines and explain their rationale, with a focus on separating users in space and time, protective face masks, and keeping surfaces virus-free. These recommendations may prove useful for other types of SRLs. © 2020 The Authors. Cytometry Part A published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. on behalf of International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control , Laboratories/organization & administration , Microscopy , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Decontamination , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Germany , Humans , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protective Factors , Research Personnel/organization & administration , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Workflow
8.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0241734, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325370

ABSTRACT

Personal protective equipment (PPE) is crucially important to the safety of both patients and medical personnel, particularly in the event of an infectious pandemic. As the incidence of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) increases exponentially in the United States and many parts of the world, healthcare provider demand for these necessities is currently outpacing supply. In the midst of the current pandemic, there has been a concerted effort to identify viable ways to conserve PPE, including decontamination after use. In this study, we outline a procedure by which PPE may be decontaminated using ultraviolet (UV) radiation in biosafety cabinets (BSCs), a common element of many academic, public health, and hospital laboratories. According to the literature, effective decontamination of N95 respirator masks or surgical masks requires UV-C doses of greater than 1 Jcm-2, which was achieved after 4.3 hours per side when placing the N95 at the bottom of the BSCs tested in this study. We then demonstrated complete inactivation of the human coronavirus NL63 on N95 mask material after 15 minutes of UV-C exposure at 61 cm (232 µWcm-2). Our results provide support to healthcare organizations looking for methods to extend their reserves of PPE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Containment of Biohazards/methods , Decontamination/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Ultraviolet Rays , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation , Equipment Reuse , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Laboratories/organization & administration , Masks/virology , N95 Respirators/virology , Radiometry/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
9.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 56, 2021 06 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296122

ABSTRACT

Background: The adherence of medical laboratory technicians (MLT) to infection control guidelines is essential for reducing the risk of exposure to infectious agents. This study explored the adherence of MLT towards infection control practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: The study population consisted of MLT (n = 444) who worked in private and government health sectors in Jordan. A self-reported survey was used to collect data from participants. Findings: More than 87% of the participants reported adherence to hand-washing guidelines and using personal protective equipment (PPE) when interacting with patients (74.5%), and handling clinical samples (70.0%). Besides, 88.1%, 48.2%, and 7.7% reported wearing of lab coats, face masks, and goggles, at all times, respectively. The majority reported increased adherence to infection control practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. This includes increased PPE use at the workplace (94.2%), increased frequency of disinfection of laboratory surfaces (92.4%) and laboratory equipment (86.7%), and increased frequency of handwashing/use of antiseptics (94.6%). Having a graduate degree was significantly associated with increased adherence of participants to the daily use of goggles/eye protection (p = 0.002), and the use of PPE while handling clinical samples (p = 0.011). Having work experience of >10 years was associated with increased adherence to the use of PPE while handling clinical samples (p = 0.001). Conclusion: MLT reported very good adherence with most assessed infection control practices. In addition, they reported increased conformity with infection control guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Guideline Adherence , Infection Control , Laboratories , Medical Laboratory Personnel , Personal Protective Equipment , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Guideline Adherence/standards , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Hand Disinfection/methods , Hand Disinfection/standards , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Jordan/epidemiology , Laboratories/organization & administration , Laboratories/standards , Male , Medical Laboratory Personnel/standards , Medical Laboratory Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
13.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 35(6): e23804, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Before public health emergencies became a major challenge worldwide, the scope of laboratory management was only related to developing, maintaining, improving, and sustaining the quality of accurate laboratory results for improved clinical outcomes. Indeed, quality management is an especially important aspect and has achieved great milestones during the development of clinical laboratories. CURRENT STATUS: However, since the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to be a threat worldwide, previous management mode inside the separate laboratory could not cater to the demand of the COVID-19 public health emergency. Among emerging new issues, the prominent challenges during the period of COVID-19 pandemic are rapid-launched laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) for urgent clinical application, rapid expansion of testing capabilities, laboratory medicine resources, and personnel shortages. These related issues are now impacting on clinical laboratory and need to be effectively addressed. CONCLUSION: Different from traditional views of laboratory medicine management that focus on separate laboratories, present clinical laboratory management must be multidimensional mode which should consider consolidation of the efficient network of regional clinical laboratories and reasonable planning of laboratories resources from the view of overall strategy. Based on relevant research and our experience, in this review, we retrospect the history trajectory of laboratory medicine management, and also, we provide existing and other feasible recommended management strategies for laboratory medicine in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Services , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Laboratories , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Services/standards , Humans , Laboratories/organization & administration , Laboratories/standards , Point-of-Care Testing , Public Health , Quality Assurance, Health Care
14.
Lab Med ; 52(4): e115-e124, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1214641

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the experiences of medical laboratory professionals (MLPs) and their perceptions of the needs of clinical laboratories in response to COVID-19. METHODS: We surveyed laboratory professionals working in United States clinical laboratories during the initial months of the pandemic. RESULTS: Overall clinical laboratory testing and overtime work for laboratorians decreased during the first months of the pandemic. Laboratory professionals reported better or unchanged job satisfaction, feelings toward their work, and morale in their workplace, which were related to healthcare facility and laboratory leadership response. They reported receiving in-kind gifts, but no hazard pay, for their essential work. Important supply needs included reagents and personal protective equipment (PPE). CONCLUSION: The response by healthcare facilities and laboratory leadership can influence MLPs job satisfaction, feelings toward their work, and laboratory morale during a pandemic. Current COVID-19 laboratory testing management, in the absence of sufficient reagents and supplies, cannot fully address the needs of clinical laboratories.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laboratories , Medical Laboratory Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Laboratories/organization & administration , Laboratories/statistics & numerical data , Laboratories/supply & distribution , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
15.
J Vet Diagn Invest ; 33(3): 399-409, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153939

ABSTRACT

Test data generated by ~60 accredited member laboratories of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) is of exceptional quality. These data are captured by 1 of 13 laboratory information management systems (LIMSs) developed specifically for veterinary diagnostic laboratories (VDLs). Beginning ~2000, the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN) developed an electronic messaging system for LIMS to automatically send standardized data streams for 14 select agents to a national repository. This messaging enables the U.S. Department of Agriculture to track and respond to high-consequence animal disease outbreaks such as highly pathogenic avian influenza. Because of the lack of standardized data collection in the LIMSs used at VDLs, there is, to date, no means of summarizing VDL large data streams for multi-state and national animal health studies or for providing near-real-time tracking for hundreds of other important animal diseases in the United States that are detected routinely by VDLs. Further, VDLs are the only state and federal resources that can provide early detection and identification of endemic and emerging zoonotic diseases. Zoonotic diseases are estimated to be responsible for 2.5 billion cases of human illness and 2.7 million deaths worldwide every year. The economic and health impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is self-evident. We review here the history and progress of data management in VDLs and discuss ways of seizing unexplored opportunities to advance data leveraging to better serve animal health, public health, and One Health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laboratories/organization & administration , One Health , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Veterinary Medicine
16.
J Cell Biol ; 220(3)2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153069

ABSTRACT

JCB asks early career investigators to share their experience launching a lab during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laboratories/organization & administration , Pandemics , Research Personnel/psychology , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Efficiency , Humans , Stress, Psychological
19.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 34(3): 175-180, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1097074

ABSTRACT

Value-Based Healthcare (VBHC) aims to improve the overall quality, safety, and sustainability of healthcare while reducing delivery costs of more effective care. Despite advantages associated with VBHC transformation, the road to its adoption has been lengthy. Laboratory Medicine (LM) is in a prime position to lead the transition to VBHC because of its key role in diagnosis and treatment of patients. Laboratory medicine results inform/influence 50% to 70% of all clinical decisions. This article summarizes some issues associated with adoption of VBHC and related healthcare innovations and suggests potential approaches using LM-specific examples to help accelerate adoption. Laboratory medicine is both a useful model for VBHC implementation and facilitator for related innovation adoption by helping to target patient populations that would benefit most from specific interventions. The critical value of rapidly adopted diagnostic technologies used during the COVID-19 pandemic and economic recovery provide important insights about the need to embrace and accelerate VBHC implementation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Laboratories/organization & administration , Value-Based Purchasing , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , Pathology, Clinical , Point-of-Care Systems , Precision Medicine , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Cell Biol ; 220(3)2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096428

ABSTRACT

JCB asks early career investigators to share their experience launching a lab during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laboratories/organization & administration , Pandemics , Research Personnel/psychology , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Efficiency , Humans , Stress, Psychological
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL