Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 17 de 17
Filter
1.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(5): 1753-1760, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754184

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) primarily affects the respiratory system. In some cases, the heart, kidney, liver, circulatory system, and nervous system are also affected. COVID-19-related acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in more than 20% of hospitalized patients and more than 50% of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). In this study, we aimed to review the prevalence of COVID-19-related acute kidney injury, risk factors, hospital and ICU length of stay, the need for renal replacement therapy. We also examined the effect of AKI on mortality in patients in the ICU that we treated during a 1-year period. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The files of patients with COVID-19 (n=220) who were treated in our ICU between March 21st, 2020, and June 1st, 2021, were analyzed retrospectively. Demographic data of the patients, laboratory data, and treatments were examined. Patients were divided into two groups, group I patients without AKI and, group II patients with AKI. The patients with AKI were evaluated according to the theKidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) classification and were graded. RESULTS: Of the 220 patients included in the study, 89 were female and 131 were male. The mean age of patients with AKI (70.92±11.28 years) was statistically significantly higher than among those without AKI (58.87±13.63 years) (p<0.001). In patients with AKI, ICU length of stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores, initial lactate levels, need for mechanical ventilation, duration of mechanical ventilation, and secondary infection rates were found to be statistically significantly higher. Discharge rates from the ICU in patients without AKI were statistically higher (75.3% vs. 26.6%), and mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with AKI (67.8% vs. 14.3%). CONCLUSIONS: Various studies conducted have shown that patients with COVID-19 are at risk for AKI, and this is closely related to age, sex, and disease severity. The presence of AKI in patients with COVID-19 increases mortality, and this is more evident in patients hospitalized in the ICU. In our study, the prevalence of AKI was higher in older patients with high APACHE II scores and initial lactate levels. Comorbidities such as hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and coronary artery disease in patients with AKI were higher than in those without AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units , APACHE , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Cross Infection/complications , Female , Humans , Lactic Acid/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors
3.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 60(3): 332-337, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547000

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious respiratory condition sustained by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which manifests prevalently as mild to moderate respiratory tract infection. Nevertheless, in a number of cases the clinical course may deteriorate, with onset of end organ injury, systemic dysfunction, thrombosis and ischemia. Given the clinical picture, baseline assessment and serial monitoring of blood lactate concentration may be conceivably useful in COVID-19. We hence performed a systematic literature review to explore the possible association between increased blood lactate levels, disease severity and mortality in COVID-19 patients, including comparison of lactate values between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients. We carried out an electronic search in Medline and Scopus, using the keywords "COVID-19" OR "SARS-CoV-2" AND "lactate" OR "lactic acid" OR "hyperlactatemia", between 2019 and present time (i.e. October 10, 2021), which allowed to identify 19 studies, totalling 6,459 patients. Overall, we found that COVID-19 patients with worse outcome tend to display higher lactate values than those with better outcome, although most COVID-19 patients in the studies included in our analysis did not have sustained baseline hyperlactatemia. Substantially elevated lactate values were neither consistently present in all COVID-19 patients who developed unfavourable clinical outcomes. These findings suggest that blood lactate monitoring upon admission and throughout hospitalization may be useful for early identification of higher risk of unfavourable COVID-19 illness progression, though therapeutic decisions based on using conventional hyperlactatemia cut-off values (i.e., 2.0 mmol/L) upon first evaluation may be inappropriate in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperlactatemia , Lactic Acid/blood , COVID-19/blood , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperlactatemia/virology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Crit Care Med ; 49(11): 1974-1982, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475880
5.
Crit Care Med ; 49(11): e1151-e1156, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467423

ABSTRACT

TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT04420468. OBJECTIVES: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children is frequently associated with shock; endothelial involvement may be one of the underlying mechanisms. We sought to describe endothelial dysfunction during multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children with shock and then assess the relationship between the degree of endothelial involvement and the severity of shock. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: A PICU in a tertiary hospital. PATIENTS: Patients aged under 18 (n = 28) with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children and shock, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Correlations between endothelial marker levels and shock severity were assessed using Spearman coefficient. The median (interquartile range) age was 9 years (7.5-11.2 yr). Sixteen children presented with cardiogenic and distributive shock, 10 presented with cardiogenic shock only, and two presented with distributive shock only. The median left ventricular ejection fraction, troponin level, and lactate level were, respectively, 40% (35-45%), 261 ng/mL (131-390 ng/mL), and 3.2 mmol/L (2-4.2 mmol/L). Twenty-five children received inotropes and/or vasopressors; the median Vasoactive and Inotropic Score was 8 (5-28). Plasma levels of angiopoietin-2 (6,426 pg/mL [2,814-11,836 pg/mL]), sE-selectin (130,405 pg/mL [92,987-192,499 pg/mL]), von Willebrand factor antigen (344% [288-378%]), and the angiopoietin-2/angiopoietin-1 ratio (1.111 [0.472-1.524]) were elevated and significantly correlated with the Vasoactive and Inotropic Score (r = 0.45, p = 0.016; r = 0.53, p = 0.04; r = 0.46, p = 0.013; and r = 0.46, p = 0.012, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Endothelial dysfunction is associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children with shock and may constitute one of the underlying mechanisms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Shock/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Angiopoietin-2/blood , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiotonic Agents/therapeutic use , Child , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Interleukin-6/blood , Lactic Acid/blood , Male , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Shock, Cardiogenic/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Troponin/blood , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Ventricular Function, Left
7.
Clin Biochem ; 95: 41-48, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233389

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has variable clinical presentation, from asymptomatic to severe disease leading to death. Biochemical markers may help with management and prognostication of COVID-19 patients; however, their utility is still under investigation. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate alanine aminotransferase, C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, lactate, and high sensitivity troponin T (TnT) levels in 67 patients who were admitted to a Canadian tertiary care centre for management of COVID-19. Logistic, cause-specific Cox proportional-hazards, and accelerated failure time regression modelling were performed to assess the associations of initial analyte concentrations with in-hospital death and length of stay in hospital; joint modelling was performed to assess the associations of the concentrations over the course of the hospital stay with in-hospital death. RESULTS: Initial TnT and CRP concentrations were associated with length of stay in hospital. Eighteen patients died (27%), and the median initial TnT concentration was higher in patients who died (55 ng/L) than those who lived (16 ng/L; P < 0.0001). There were no survivors with an initial TnT concentration > 64 ng/L. While the initial TnT concentration was predictive of death, later measurements were not. Only CRP had prognostic value with both the initial and subsequent measurements: a 20% increase in the initial CRP concentration was associated with a 14% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1-29%) increase in the odds of death, and the hazard of death increased 14% (95% CI: 5-25%) for each 20% increase in the current CRP value. While the initial lactate concentration was not predictive of death, subsequent measurements were. CONCLUSION: CRP, lactate and TnT were associated with poorer outcomes and appear to be useful biochemical markers for monitoring COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , Hospitalization/trends , Lactic Acid/blood , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Troponin T/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biochemical Phenomena/physiology , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Gas Analysis/methods , Blood Gas Analysis/trends , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
8.
Metabolism ; 118: 154739, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Metabolism is critical for sustaining life, immunity and infection, but its role in COVID-19 is not fully understood. METHODS: Seventy-nine COVID-19 patients, 78 healthy controls (HCs) and 30 COVID-19-like patients were recruited in a prospective cohort study. Samples were collected from COVID-19 patients with mild or severe symptoms on admission, patients who progressed from mild to severe symptoms, and patients who were followed from hospital admission to discharge. The metabolome was assayed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Serum butyric acid, 2-hydroxybutyric acid, l-glutamic acid, l-phenylalanine, l-serine, l-lactic acid, and cholesterol were enriched in COVID-19 and COVID-19-like patients versus HCs. Notably, d-fructose and succinic acid were enriched, and citric acid and 2-palmitoyl-glycerol were depleted in COVID-19 patients compared to COVID-19-like patients and HCs, and these four metabolites were not differentially distributed in non-COVID-19 groups. COVID-19 patients had enriched 4-deoxythreonic acid and depleted 1,5-anhydroglucitol compared to HCs and enriched oxalic acid and depleted phosphoric acid compared to COVID-19-like patients. A combination of d-fructose, citric acid and 2-palmitoyl-glycerol distinguished COVID-19 patients from HCs and COVID-19-like patients, with an area under the curve (AUC) > 0.92 after validation. The combination of 2-hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, cholesterol, succinic acid, L-ornithine, oleic acid and palmitelaidic acid predicted patients who progressed from mild to severe COVID-19, with an AUC of 0.969. After discharge, nearly one-third of metabolites were recovered in COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: The serum metabolome of COVID-19 patients is distinctive and has important value in investigating pathogenesis, determining a diagnosis, predicting severe cases, and improving treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Metabolome , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Amino Acids/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cholesterol/blood , Female , Fructose/blood , Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry , Humans , Hydroxybutyrates/blood , Lactic Acid/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
9.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 113, 2021 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To examine the clinical characteristics and identify independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pneumonia. METHODS: A total of 156 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia at the Central Hospital of Wuhan from January 29, 2020, to March 20, 2020, and 20 healthy individuals were enrolled in this single-centered retrospective study. The epidemiological parameters, clinical presentations, underlying diseases, laboratory test results, and disease outcomes were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: The median age of all enrolled patients was 66 years. At least one underlying disease was identified in 101 COVID-19 patients, with hypertension being the most common one, followed by cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The most common symptoms identified upon admission were fever, cough, dyspnea, and fatigue. Compared to survival cases, patients who died during hospitalization had higher plasma levels of D-dimer, creatinine, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, lactate, and lower percentage of lymphocytes (LYM [%]), platelet count and albumin levels. Most enrolled patients received antibiotics and anti-viral treatment. In addition, 60 patients received corticosteroids, and 51 received intravenous immunoglobulin infusion. Forty-four patients received noninvasive ventilation and 19 received invasive ventilation. Respiratory failure was the most frequently observed complication (106 [67.9%]), followed by sepsis (103 [66.0%]), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (67 [42.9%]), and septic shock (50 [32.1%]). Multivariable regression suggested that advanced age (OR [odds ratio] = 1.098, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 1.006-1.199, P = 0.037), shorter duration from onset to admission (OR = 0.853, 95% CI: 0.750-0.969, P = 0.015) and elevated lactate level upon admission (OR = 2.689, 95% CI: 1.044-6.926, P = 0.040) were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality for COVID-19 infection. Meanwhile, increased LYM (%) at admission (OR = 0.787, 95% CI: 0.686-0.903, P = 0.001) indicated a better prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we discovered that age, duration from onset to admission, LYM (%), and lactate level upon admission were independent factors that affecting the in-hospital mortality rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Child , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cough , Creatine Kinase/blood , Creatinine/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Fever , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lactic Acid/blood , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/etiology , Serum Albumin/metabolism , Shock, Septic/etiology , Young Adult
10.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 104(3): 1041-1044, 2021 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024748

ABSTRACT

Hypoxemia is readily detectable by assessing SpO2 levels, and these are important in optimizing COVID-19 patient management. Hyperlactatemia is a marker of tissue hypoxia, particularly in patients with increased oxygen requirement and microvascular obstruction. We monitored peripheral venous lactate concentrations in hospitalized patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 (n = 18) and in mild ambulatory COVID-19 patients in home quarantine (n = 16). Whole blood lactate decreased significantly during the clinical course and recovery in hospitalized patients (P = 0.008). The blood lactate levels were significantly higher in hospitalized patients than ambulatory patients (day 1: hospitalized versus ambulatory patients P = 0.002; day 28: hospitalized versus ambulatory patients P = < 0.0001). Elevated lactate levels may be helpful in risk stratification, and serial monitoring of lactate may prove useful in the care of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/physiopathology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Lactic Acid/blood , Adolescent , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Hypoxia/blood , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
11.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(24): 13065-13071, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000853

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Whether patients with COVID-19 require invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) is not yet clear. This article summarizes the clinical treatment process and clinical data of patients with COVID-19 and analyzes the predictive factors for mechanical ventilation for these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out from January 5, 2020, to March 23, 2020, including 98 patients with COVID-19 treated at three designated hospitals in Huangshi City, Hubei Province. Data collection included demographics, previous underlying diseases, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, imaging examination results, diagnosis, and prognosis. This study presents a summary of the patients' overall clinical characteristics and clarifies the predictive factors for MV in patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: There were 56 males and 42 females included in this study. The mortality rate was 26.53% (26/98). Fever, cough, and chest tightness were the most common symptoms (64.3%, 37.8%, and 12.2%, respectively). Thirty cases required MV, 30.61% of the total cases, and the mortality rate was 73.33%. The univariate comparison showed that dyspnea, acute physiologic assessment, chronic health evaluation (APACHE II) score, and the ratio between arterial blood oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) and oxygen concentration (FiO2) (P/F) were statistically different between the MV group and the non-MV group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Results showed the following: dyspnea; increased white blood cell count; decreased platelets; lowered albumin levels; increased urea nitrogen; increased levels of myocardial enzymes Creatine Kinase (CK), Creatine Kinase, MB Form (CKMB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); increased lactate, and lowered blood calcium tests. These findings may indicate that the patients have an increased probability of needing MV support. A cutoff value for the initial APACHE II score of >11.5 and the initial PaO2/FiO2 ratio of <122.17 mmHg should be considered for MV support for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Oxygen/blood , Partial Pressure , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , APACHE , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Area Under Curve , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Creatine Kinase/blood , Creatine Kinase, MB Form/blood , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Hypoalbuminemia/blood , Hypocalcemia/blood , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lactic Acid/blood , Leukocytosis/blood , Male , Middle Aged , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombocytopenia/blood
12.
J Epidemiol Glob Health ; 11(1): 98-104, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the first COVID-19 patient in Saudi Arabia (March, 2020) more than 338,539 cases and approximately 4996 dead were reported. We present the main characteristics and outcomes of critically ill COVID-19 patients that were admitted in the largest Ministry of Health Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This retrospective study, analyzed routine epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory data of COVID-19 critically ill patients in King Saud Medical City (KSMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March 20, 2020 and May 31, 2020. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 infection was confirmed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays performed on nasopharyngeal swabs in all enrolled cases. Outcome measures such as 28-days mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and ICU length of stay were analyzed. RESULTS: Three-hundred-and-fifty-two critically ill COVID-19 patients were included in the study. Patients had a mean age of 50.63 ± 13.3 years, 87.2% were males, and 49.4% were active smokers. Upon ICU admission, 56.8% of patients were mechanically ventilated with peripheral oxygen saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2) ratio of 158 ± 32. No co-infections with other endemic viruses were observed. Duration of mechanical ventilation was 16 (IQR: 8-28) days; ICU length of stay was 18 (IQR: 9-29) days, and 28-day mortality was 32.1%. Multivariate regression analysis showed that old age [Odds Ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 1.03-1.21], active smoking [OR: 3, 95% CI: 2.51-3.66], pulmonary embolism [OR: 2.91, 95% CI: 2.65-3.36), decreased SpO2/FiO2 ratio [OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.91-0.97], and increased lactate [OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 2.4-4.9], and D-dimers [OR: 2.54, 95% CI: 1.57-3.12] were mortality predictors. CONCLUSION: Old age, active smoking, pulmonary embolism, decreased SpO2/FiO2 ratio, and increased lactate and D-dimers were predictors of 28-day mortality in critically ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pulmonary Embolism , Smoking/epidemiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , Causality , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Humans , Lactic Acid/blood , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Oxygen Consumption , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors
13.
Life Sci ; 264: 118450, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885374

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a widely used antimalarial drug, is proposed to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, no report is currently available regarding the direct effects of HCQ on gut microbiota, which is associated with the outcomes of elderly patients with COVID-19. Here, we first investigated the effects of HCQ on intestinal microecology in mice. MAIN METHODS: Fifteen female C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two groups: HCQ group (n = 10) and control group (n = 5). Mice in the HCQ group were administered with HCQ at dose of 100 mg/kg by gavage daily for 14 days. The feces of mice were collected before and on the 7th and 14th days after HCQ challenge, and then analyzed by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. At the end of the experiment, the hematology, serum biochemistry and cytokines were determined, respectively. The mRNA expression of tight junction proteins in colonic tissues were also studied by RT-PCR. KEY FINDINGS: HCQ challenge had no effects on the counts of white blood cells, the levels of serum cytokines, and the gene expression of tight junction proteins in colon. HCQ also did not increase the content of serum d-lactate in mice. Notably, HCQ significantly decreased the diversity of gut microbiota, increased the relative abundance of phylum Bacteroidetes whereas decreased that of Firmicutes. SIGNIFICANCE: Short-term high dose HCQ challenge changes gut microbiota but not the intestinal integrity and immunological responses in mice. Special attention should be paid to the effects of HCQ on intestinal microecology in future clinical use.


Subject(s)
Colon/drug effects , Colon/immunology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/drug effects , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Administration, Oral , Animals , Colon/metabolism , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Feces/microbiology , Female , Lactic Acid/blood , Mice , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Tight Junction Proteins/biosynthesis
14.
Molecules ; 25(16)2020 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-822410

ABSTRACT

Quantification of lactate/lactic acid in critical care environments is essential as lactate serves as an important biochemical marker for the adequacy of the haemodynamic circulation in shock and of cell respiration at the onset of sepsis/septic shock. Hence, in this study, ATR-FTIR was explored as a potential tool for lactate measurement, as the current techniques depend on sample preparation and fails to provide rapid response. Moreover, the effects of pH on PBS samples (7.4, 7, 6.5 and 6) and change in solution conditions (PBS to whole blood) on spectral features were also investigated. A total 189 spectra from five sets of lactate containing media were obtained. Results suggests that lactate could be measured with more than 90% accuracy in the wavenumber range of 1500-600 cm-1. The findings of this study further suggest that there exist no effects of change in pH or media, when estimating lactate concentration changes in this range of the Mid-IR spectral region.


Subject(s)
Blood Chemical Analysis/methods , Lactic Acid/blood , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared , Analytic Sample Preparation Methods , Animals , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Sheep , Time Factors
15.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 16384, 2020 10 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811547

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak is becoming a public health emergency. Data are limited on the clinical characteristics and causes of death. A retrospective analysis of COVID-19 deaths were performed for patients' clinical characteristics, laboratory results, and causes of death. In total, 56 patients (72.7%) of the decedents (male-female ratio 51:26, mean age 71 ± 13, mean survival time 17.4 ± 8.4 days) had comorbidities. Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and sepsis were the main causes of death. Increases in C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), D-dimer and lactic acid and decreases in lymphocytes were common laboratory results. Intergroup analysis showed that (1) most female decedents had cough and diabetes. (2) The proportion of young- and middle-aged deaths was higher than elderly deaths for males, while elderly decedents were more prone to myocardial injury and elevated CRP. (3) CRP and LDH increased and cluster of differentiation (CD) 4+ and CD8+ cells decreased significantly in patients with hypertension. The majority of COVID-19 decedents are male, especially elderly people with comorbidities. The main causes of death are ARF and sepsis. Most female decedents have cough and diabetes. Myocardial injury is common in elderly decedents. Patients with hypertension are prone to an increased inflammatory index, tissue hypoxia and cellular immune injury.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Sepsis/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Cause of Death , China , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lactic Acid/blood , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Sepsis/etiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/etiology
16.
Virol J ; 17(1): 80, 2020 06 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-606695

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Convalescent plasma (CP) transfusion was reported to be effective in treating critically ill patients with COVID-19, and hydroxychloroquine could potently inhibit SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. Herein, we reported a case receiving combination therapy with CP transfusion and hydroxychloroquine for the first time. CASE PRESENTATION: Laboratory findings showed high lactic acid level (2.1 mmol/L) and C-reactive protein (CRP, 48.8 mg/L), and low white blood cell count (1.96 × 109/L) in a 65-year-old Chinese man, who was diagnosed with severe COVID-19. CP was intravenously given twice, and hydroxychloroquine was orally administrated for a week (0.2 g, three times a day). The lactic acid and C-reactive protein levels remained high (2.1 mmol/L and 73.23 mg/L, respectively), while the arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation decreased to 86% with a low oxygenation index (OI, 76 mmHg) on day 4 after CP transfusion. His temperature returned to normal and the OI ascended above 300 on day 11. Moreover, the RNA test remained positive in throat swab, and computed tomography revealed severe pulmonary lesions on day 11 after admission. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that the effectiveness of combination therapy with CP and hydroxychloroquine may be non-optimal, and specific therapy needs to be explored.


Subject(s)
Blood Component Transfusion/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Administration, Oral , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Viral/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Lactic Acid/blood , Leukocyte Count , Male , Oxyhemoglobins , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load
17.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(15): e016706, 2020 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-619952

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 threatens human health, and the mortality rate is higher in patients who develop myocardial damage. However, the possible risk factors for myocardial damage in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are not fully known. METHODS AND RESULTS Critical type patients were selected randomly from 204 confirmed COVID-19 cases occurring in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from February 1, 2020 to February 24, 2020. Univariate analyses were used to compare the 2 groups: the myocardial damage group and the non-myocardial damage group. A total of 82 critical patients with COVID-19 were recruited: 34 with myocardial damage and 48 without myocardial damage. A total of 30 patients died in the myocardial damage group, and 20 died in the non-myocardial damage group. In univariate analysis, the proportion of elderly patients (>70 years old, 70.59% versus 37.50%; P=0.003) and patients with cardiovascular disease (41.18% versus 12.50%; P=0.003) was higher among myocardial damage patients than among non-myocardial damage patients. Multivariate analysis showed that age >70 years old (hazard ratio [HR], 2.44; 95% CI, 1.01-5.40), CRP (C-reactive protein) >100 mg/L (HR, 1.92; 95% CI, 0.94-3.92), lactate dehydrogenase >300 U/L (HR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.03-6.90), and lactic acid >3 mmol/L (HR, 3.25; 95% CI, 1.57-6.75) were independent risk factors for myocardial damage in patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS Old age (>70 years old), CRP >100 mg/L, lactate dehydrogenase >300 U/L, and lactic acid >3 mmol/L are high-risk factors related to myocardial damage in critical patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Cardiomyopathies/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies/virology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lactic Acid/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL