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1.
BMC Surg ; 22(1): 6, 2022 Jan 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639167

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ingestion of fish bones leading to gastric perforation and inducing abscess formation in the caudate lobe of the liver is very rare. CASE PRESENTATION: A 67-year-old man presented to our hospital with a 2-day history of subxiphoid pain. There were no specific symptoms other than pain. Laboratory tests showed only an increase in the number and percentage of neutrophils. Contrast-enhanced Computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed two linear dense opacities in the gastric cardia, one of which penetrated the stomach and was adjacent to the caudate lobe of the liver, with inflammatory changes in the caudate lobe. We finally diagnosed his condition as a caudate lobe abscess secondary to intestinal perforation caused by a fishbone based on the history and imaging findings. The patient underwent 3D laparoscopic partial caudate lobectomy, incision and drainage of the liver abscess, and fishbone removal. The procedure was successful and we removed the fishbone from the liver. The patient was discharged on the 9th postoperative day without other complications. CONCLUSIONS: Liver abscess caused by foreign bodies requires multidisciplinary treatment. Especially when located in the caudate lobe, we must detect and remove the cause of the abscess as early as possible. Foreign bodies that perforate the gastrointestinal tract can penetrate to the liver and cause abscess formation, as in this case. When exploring the etiology of liver abscesses, we should investigate the general condition, including the whole gastrointestinal tract.


Subject(s)
Foreign Bodies , Foreign-Body Migration , Laparoscopy , Liver Abscess , Aged , Animals , Foreign Bodies/complications , Foreign Bodies/diagnostic imaging , Foreign Bodies/surgery , Foreign-Body Migration/complications , Foreign-Body Migration/diagnostic imaging , Foreign-Body Migration/surgery , Humans , Liver Abscess/diagnostic imaging , Liver Abscess/etiology , Liver Abscess/surgery , Male
2.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 22(1): 19, 2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During a global crisis like the current COVID-19 pandemic, delayed admission to hospital in cases of emergent medical illness may lead to serious adverse consequences. We aimed to determine whether such delayed admission affected the severity of an inflammatory process regarding acute appendicitis, and its convalescence. METHODS: In a retrospective observational cohort case-control study, we analyzed the medical data of 60 patients who were emergently and consecutively admitted to our hospital due to acute appendicitis as established by clinical presentation and imaging modalities, during the period of the COVID-19 pandemic (our study group). We matched a statistically control group consisting of 97 patients who were admitted during a previous 12-month period for the same etiology. All underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. The main study parameters included intraoperative findings (validated by histopathology), duration of abdominal pain prior to admission, hospital stay and postoperative convalescence (reflecting the consequences of delay in diagnosis and surgery). RESULTS: The mean duration of abdominal pain until surgery was significantly longer in the study group. The rate of advanced appendicitis (suppurative and gangrenous appendicitis as well as peri-appendicular abscess) was greater in the study than in the control group (38.3 vs. 21.6%, 23.3 vs. 16.5%, and 5 vs. 1% respectively), as well as mean hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: A global crisis like the current viral pandemic may significantly affect emergent admissions to hospital (as in case of acute appendicitis), leading to delayed surgical interventions and its consequences.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis , COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Acute Disease , Appendectomy , Appendicitis/diagnosis , Appendicitis/epidemiology , Appendicitis/surgery , Case-Control Studies , Delayed Diagnosis , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 23999, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585795

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a highly contagious virus causing mainly respiratory track disease called COVID-19, which dissemination in the whole world in the 2020 has resulted in World Health Organisation (WHO) announcing the pandemic. As a consequence Polish Government made a decision to go into a lockdown in order to secure the population against SARS-CoV-2 outbreak what had its major influence on the Polish Health Care System. All of the social and medical factors caused by the pandemic might influence children's health care, including urgent cases. The aim of this survey was the analysis of medical charts with focus on the course and results of surgical treatment of children who underwent appendectomy before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Material and methods: We performed analysis of charts of 365 subjects hospitalized in the Pediatric Surgery Department from 1st January 2019 to 31st December 2020 because of acute appendicitis. Patients were divided into two groups-those treated in 2019-before pandemic outbreak, and those treated in 2020 in the course of pandemic. Results: the most common type of appendicitis was phlegmonous (61% of cases in 2019 and 51% of cases in 2020). Followed by diffuse purulent peritonitis (18% of cases in 2019 vs 31% of cases in 2020), gangrenous (19% of cases in 2019 vs 15% of cases in 2020) and simple superficial appendicitis (1% of cases in 2019 vs 3% of cases in 2020). There was statistically significant difference in the length of hospitalization: in 2019 the mean length of hospi-talization was 4.761 vs 5.634 in 2020. Laparoscopic appendectomy was performed more frequently before the COVID period (63% of cases treated in 2019 vs 61% of cases treated in 2020). In the pandemic year 2020, there was double increase in the number of conversion from the laparoscopic approach to the classic open surgery. In the year 2019 drainage of abdominal cavity was necessary in 22% of patients treated with appendectomy, in 2020 the amount of cases threated with appendectomy and drainage increased to 32%. Conclusions: fear of being infected, the limited availability of appointments at General Practitioners and the new organisation of the medical health care system during pandemic, delay proper diagnosis of appendicitis. Forementioned delay leads to higher number of complicated cases treated with open appendectomy and drainage of abdominal cavity, higher number of conversions from the laparoscopic to classic open technique, and longer hospitalization of children treated with appendectomy in the year of pandemic.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis/classification , Appendicitis/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Appendectomy/methods , Appendectomy/statistics & numerical data , Child , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Laparoscopy/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay , Male , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Time-to-Treatment
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(50): e27844, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583963

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, surgical training has become increasingly challenging due to required social distancing. Therefore, the use of virtual reality (VR)-simulation could be a helpful tool for imparting surgical skills, especially in minimally invasive environments. Visual spatial ability (VSA) might influence the learning curve for laparoscopic surgical skills. However, little is known about the influence of VSA for surgical novices on VR-simulator training regarding the complexity of different tasks over a long-term training period. Our study evaluated prior VSA and VSA development in surgical trainees during VR-simulator training, and its influence on surgical performance in simulator training. METHODS: In our single-center prospective two-arm randomized trial, VSA was measured with a tube figure test before curriculum training. After 1:1 randomization, the training group (TG) participated in the entire curriculum training consisting of 48 different VR-simulator tasks with varying difficulty over a continuous nine-day training session. The control group (CG) performed two of these tasks on day 1 and 9. Correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the influence of VSA on VR-related surgical skills and to measure procedural abilities. RESULTS: Sixty students (33 women) were included. Significant improvements in the TG in surgical performance and faster completion times were observed from days 1 to 9 for the scope orientation 30° right-handed (SOR), and cholecystectomy dissection tasks after the structured 9-day training program. After training, the TG with pre-existing low VSA scores achieved performance levels similar to those with pre-existing high VSA scores for the two VR simulator tasks. Significant correlations between VSA and surgical performance on complex laparoscopic camera navigation SOR tasks were found before training. CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed that that all trainees improved their surgical skills irrespective of previous VSA during structured VR simulator training. An increase in VSA resulted in improvements in surgical performance and training progress, which was more distinct in complex simulator tasks. Further, we demonstrated a positive relationship between VSA and surgical performance of the TG, especially at the beginning of training. Our results identified pre-existing levels of VSA as a predictor of surgical performance.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Laparoscopy , Simulation Training , Spatial Navigation , Virtual Reality , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Laparoscopy/education , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , User-Computer Interface
5.
BMC Surg ; 21(1): 422, 2021 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582080

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV2 virus has been identified in abdominal cavity of the COVID-19 patients. Therefore, the potential viral transmission from any surgical created smoke in these patients is of concern especially in laparoscopic surgery. This study aimed to compare the amount of surgical smoke and surgical field contamination between laparoscopic and open surgery in fresh cadavers. METHODS: Cholecystectomy in 12 cadavers was performed and they were divided into 4 groups: laparoscopic approach with or without smoke evacuator, and open approach with or without smoke evacuator. The increased particle counts in surgical smoke of each group were analyzed. In the model of appendectomy, surgical field contamination under ultraviolet light and visual contamination scale between laparoscopic and open approach were compared. RESULTS: Open cholecystectomy significantly produced a greater amount of overall particle sizes, particle sizes < 5 µm and particle sizes ≥ 5 µm than laparoscopic cholecystectomy (10,307 × 103 vs 3738 × 103, 10,226 × 103 vs 3685 × 103 and 81 × 103 vs 53 × 103 count/m3, respectively at p < 0.05). The use of smoke evacuator led to decrease in the amount of overall particle sizes of 58% and 32.4% in the open and laparoscopic chelecystectomy respectively. Median (interquatile range) visual contamination scale of surgical field in open appendectomy [3.50 (2.33, 4.67)] was significantly greater than laparoscopic appendectomy [1.50 (0.67, 2.33)] at p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy yielded less smoke-related particles than open cholecystectomy. The use of smoke evacuator, abeit non-significantly, reduced the particles in both open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Laparoscopic appendectomy had a lower degree of surgical field contamination than the open approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Cadaver , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1996923, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493438

ABSTRACT

In this paper, Mixed Reality (MR) has been exploited in the operating rooms to perform laparoscopic and open surgery with the aim of providing remote mentoring to the medical doctors under training during the Covid-19 pandemic. The employed architecture, which has put together MR smartglasses, a Digital Imaging Player, and a Mixed Reality Toolkit, has been used for cancer surgery at the IRCCS Hospital 'Giovanni Paolo II' in southern Italy. The feasibility of using the conceived platform for real-time remote mentoring has been assessed on the basis of surveys distributed to the trainees after each surgery.


Subject(s)
Augmented Reality , COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Mentoring , Neoplasms , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Surg Endosc ; 35(11): 6268-6277, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491141

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The management of choledocholithiasis evolves with diagnostic imaging and therapeutic technology, facilitating a laparoscopic approach. We review our first 200 cases of laparoscopic exploration of the common bile duct, highlighting challenges and lessons learnt. METHODS: We retrospectively studied the first 200 cases of laparoscopic cholecystectomy with common bile duct exploration between 2006 and 2019. The database contains demographics, clinicopathological characteristics, diagnostic modalities, operative techniques, duration and outcomes. RESULTS: We compared two approaches: transcystic vs. transcholedochal in our 200 cases. Choledocholithiasis was suspected preoperatively in 163 patients. 21 cases found no stones. Of the remainder, 111/179 cases were completed via the transcystic route and the remaining were completed transcholedochally (68/179); 25% of the transcholedochal cases were converted from a transcystic approach. CBD diameter for transcystic route was 8.2 vs. 11.0 mm for transcholedochal. Total clearance rate was 84%. Retained or recurrent stones were noted in 7 patients. Length of stay was 5.8 days, 3.5 days in the transcystic route vs. 9.4 days after transcholedochal clearance. Eight patients required re-operation for bleeding or bile leak. No mortalities were recorded in this cohort, but 2 cases (1%) developed a subsequent CBD stricture. CONCLUSION: Concomitant laparoscopic common bile duct clearance with cholecystectomy is feasible, safe and effective in a district general hospital, despite constraints of time and resources. The transcystic route has a lower complication rate and shorter hospital stay, and hence our preference of this route for all cases. Advancements in stone management technology will allow wider adoption of this technique, benefitting more patients.


Subject(s)
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic , Choledocholithiasis , Laparoscopy , Choledocholithiasis/diagnostic imaging , Choledocholithiasis/surgery , Common Bile Duct/diagnostic imaging , Common Bile Duct/surgery , Hospitals, General , Humans , Retrospective Studies
10.
J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A ; 31(10): 1106-1113, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475742

ABSTRACT

Background: The smoke created by energy-based devices during surgery may have the potential to transmit viral components to operating room staff. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed staff safety regulations. However, it is not clearly understood whether it can be transmitted via surgical smoke. Laparoscopic approaches have become the standard surgical procedure in many cases, but some of previous investigations have advised to pretermit these approaches due to high risk of COVID-19 transmission. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the English literature that were indexed in the PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases by using key words including Virus, viral transmission, surgical smoke, surgical plum, laparoscopy, and COVID-19 both solely and in two-word combination. A total of 87 articles were found relevant, and after reviewing the abstract, 33 articles were shortlisted and summarized. Results: Previous studies have focused on different surgical instruments that generate smoke, methods to collect and analyze the smoke and to understand the implications of its exposure after an analysis. A total of 9 out of 11 studies on the potential transmission of human papilloma virus through surgical smoke found evidence in favor of transmission. There were studies on the possible transmission of HIV, hepatitis B virus, and Sabin poliomyelitis vaccine virus 2. Conclusion: We do not believe that laparoscopic procedures may have extra risk for COVID-19 transmission compared with the open procedures, but it is always advised that the operating room staff adhere to the safety instructions during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Humans , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Smoke/adverse effects
11.
Rev. Col. Bras. Cir ; 48: e20202717, 2021. graf
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1468209

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Acute appendicitis (AA) is a frequent cause of abdominal pain requiring surgical treatment. During the COVID-19 pandemic, surgical societies considered other therapeutic options due to uncertainties in the evolution of the disease. The purpose of this study is to assess the treatment of AA by members of two Brazilian surgical societies in this period. A common questionnaire was sent in 2020. There were 382 responses. Most surgeons had more than 15 years of profession (68.3%) and treated more than five cases per month (44.8%). About 72.5% would indicate chest CT to investigate COVID-19 in patients with AA. For those patients sustaining uncomplicated AA, without COVID-19, 60.2% would indicate laparoscopic appendectomy (VLA), followed by open appendectomy (OA) (31.7%) and non-operative management (NOM) (1.3%). For those with mild COVID-19, OA was suggested by 51.0%, followed by VLA (29.6%) and NOM (6.0%). For those with severe COVID-19, OA was proposed by 35.3%, followed by NOM (19.9%) and VLA (18.6%). For patients with periappendiceal abscesses, without COVID-19, VLA was suggested by 54.2%, followed by OA (33.2%) and NOM (4.4%). For those with mild COVID-19, OA was proposed in 49.5%, followed by VLA (29.3%) and NOM (8.9%). In those with severe COVID-19, OA was proposed in 36.6%, followed by NOM (25.1%) and VLA (17.3%). This information, based on two recognized Brazilian surgical societies, can help the surgeon to select the best approach individually.


RESUMO A apendicite aguda (AA) é causa frequente de abdome agudo cirúrgico. Durante a pandemia de COVID-19, devido às incertezas na evolução da doença, sociedades consideraram outras opções terapêuticas. Nosso objetivo é descrever o tratamento da AA por membros do CBC e SBAIT neste período. O questionário foi enviado em 2020. Houve 382 respostas. A maioria dos profissionais tinha mais de 15 anos de profissão (68,3%) e atendia mais de cinco casos por mês (44,8%). Cerca de 72,5% realizariam TC de tórax para investigação de COVID-19 em pacientes com AA. Nos com AA não complicada, sem COVID-19, 60,2% optariam pela apendicectomia videolaparoscópica (AVL), seguido de apendicectomia aberta (AAB) (31,7%) e tratamento não operatório (TNO) (1,3%). Nos com COVID-19 leve, AAB foi proposta por 51,0%, seguido da AVL (29,6%) e TNO (6,0%). Nos com COVID-19 grave, a AAB foi proposta por 35,3%, seguido de TNO (19,9%) e AVL (18,6%). Nos com AA complicadas com abscesso, sem COVID-19, AVL foi sugerida por 54,2%, seguida da AAB (33,2%) e TNO (4,4%). Nos com COVID-19 leve, a AAB foi proposta em 49,5%, seguidos da AVL (29,3%) e TNO (8,9%). Nos com COVID-19 grave, a AAB foi proposta em 36,6%, seguido de TNO (25,1%) e AVL (17,3%). Estas são opções de cirurgiões de duas sociedades cirúrgicas reconhecidas e podem auxiliar o colega que está na linha de frente a definir a melhor conduta individualmente.


Subject(s)
Humans , Appendicitis/surgery , Appendicitis/epidemiology , Laparoscopy , COVID-19 , Appendectomy , Acute Disease , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Length of Stay
12.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 28(1): 203, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456031

ABSTRACT

The increasing prevalence of morbid obesity in the United States has been accompanied by a concomitant rise in bariatric surgery to help combat the epidemic. The relationship between obesity and certain cancers, such as esophageal adenocarcinoma, is well established. The need for minimally invasive techniques to treat esophageal cancer in patients with previous bariatric surgery is growing and can present a unique surgical challenge. This report presents the case of a 55-year-old woman with a previous Roux-en-Y gastric bypass who was shown by endoscopy to have an invasive adenocarcinoma located in the distal thoracic esophagus. This necessitated an excision of the thoracic esophagus and the gastric pouch. A laparoscopic and thoracoscopic Ivor-Lewis esophagogastrectomy was performed for this complex patient with esophageal adenocarcinoma. The remnant stomach was fashioned into a gastric conduit using a 60-mm linear stapler with a staple height of 4.1 mm (Echelon, Ethicon Endosurgery, Blue Ash, OH). The reconstruction was performed using a 25-mm Orvil (Covidien, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and EEA 25-mm DST XL (Covidien) to create a circular stapled thoracic esophagogastric anastomosis. A feeding jejunostomy was placed in the residual 130-cm Roux limb. The study demonstrated that minimally invasive esophagectomy is safe and technically feasible with appropriate oncologic outcomes for patients with previous gastric bypass. This cohort of patients will undoubtedly continue to grow in the coming years.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Esophageal Neoplasms , Gastric Bypass , Laparoscopy , Adenocarcinoma/surgery , Anastomosis, Surgical , Esophageal Neoplasms/surgery , Esophagectomy , Female , Gastrectomy , Humans , Middle Aged
13.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(2): e81-e83, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454023

ABSTRACT

Diaphragmatic eventration, both congenital and acquired, is defined as abnormal elevation of the diaphragm. We report 2 cases of adult symptomatic diaphragmatic eventration successfully treated by laparoscopic diaphragmatic resection with an endostaple. These cases were observed for more than 1 year with no complications or recurrence after surgery.


Subject(s)
Diaphragm/surgery , Diaphragmatic Eventration/surgery , Laparoscopy/methods , Surgical Mesh , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Sutures
14.
Surg Endosc ; 35(6): 2981-2985, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453742

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Stray energy transfer from surgical monopolar radiofrequency energy instruments can cause unintended thermal injuries during laparoscopic surgery. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery transfers more stray energy than traditional laparoscopic surgery. There is paucity of published data concerning stray energy during single-incision robotic surgery. The purpose of this study was to quantify stray energy transfer during traditional, multiport robotic surgery (TRS) compared to single-incision robotic surgery (SIRS). METHODS: An in vivo porcine model was used to simulate a multiport or single-incision robotic cholecystectomy (DaVinci Si, Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A 5 s, open air activation of the monopolar scissors was done on 30 W and 60 W coag mode (ForceTriad, Covidien-Medtronic, Boulder, CO) and Swift Coag effect 3, max power 180 W (VIO 300D, ERBE USA, Marietta, GA). Temperature of the tissue (°C) adjacent to the tip of the assistant grasper or the camera was measured with a thermal camera (E95, FLIR Systems, Wilsonville, OR) to quantify stray energy transfer. RESULTS: Stray energy transfer was greater in the SIRS setup compared to TRS setup at the assistant grasper (11.6 ± 3.3 °C vs. 8.4 ± 1.6 °C, p = 0.013). Reducing power from 60 to 30 W significantly reduced stray energy transfer in SIRS (15.3 ± 3.4 °C vs. 11.6 ± 3.3 °C, p = 0.023), but not significantly for TRS (9.4 ± 2.5 °C vs. 8.4 ± 1.6 °C, p = 0.278). The use of a constant voltage regulating generator also minimized stray energy transfer for both SIRS (0.7 ± 0.4 °C, p < 0.001) and TRS (0.7 ± 0.4 °C, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: More stray energy transfer occurs during single-incision robotic surgery than multiport robotic surgery. Utilizing a constant voltage regulating generator minimized stray energy transfer for both setups. These data can be used to guide robotic surgeons in their use of safe, surgical energy.


Subject(s)
Laparoscopy , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Robotics , Surgical Wound , Animals , Energy Transfer , Swine
15.
Minerva Chir ; 75(5): 298-304, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456626

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Morgagni hernias present technical challenges. The laparoscopic approach for repair was first described in 1992; however, as these hernias are uncommon in adult life, few data exist on the optimal method for surgical management. The purpose of this study was to analyze a method for laparoscopic repair of Morgagni giant hernias using laparoscopic primary closure with V lock (Medtronic, Covidien). METHODS: This case series describes a method of laparoscopic Morgagni hernia repair using primary closure. In all patients, a laparoscopic transabdominal approach was used. The content of the hernia was reduced into the abdomen, and the diaphragmatic defect was closed with a running laparoscopic suture using a self-fixating suture. Clips were placed at the edges of the suture to secure the pledged sutures to both the anterior and posterior fascia. Demographic data such as BMI and operative and postoperative data were collected. RESULTS: Retrospectively collected data for 9 patients were analyzed. There were 1 (11.1%) males and 8 (88.8%) females. The median BMI was 29.14±52 kg/m2. The median operative time was 80±25 minutes. There were no intraoperative complications or conversions to open surgery. Patients began a fluid diet on the first postoperative day and were discharged after a median hospital stay of 3±1.87 days. In a median follow-up of 36 months, we did not observe any recurrences. CONCLUSIONS: Transabdominal laparoscopic approach with primary closure of the diaphragmatic defect is a viable approach for the repair of Morgagni hernia. In our experience, the use of laparoscopic transabdominal suture fixed to the fascia allowed the closure of the defect laparoscopically with minimal tension on the repairs.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques , Hernias, Diaphragmatic, Congenital/surgery , Herniorrhaphy/methods , Laparoscopy , Suture Techniques , Aged , Body Mass Index , Fasciotomy , Female , Hernias, Diaphragmatic, Congenital/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Medical Illustration , Operative Time , Retrospective Studies
16.
Khirurgiia (Mosk) ; (4): 11-17, 2020.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456579

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare laparoscopic manual esophagoenterostomy and esophagoenterostomy with mechanical stapling anastomotic devices after laparoscopic gastrectomy for stomach cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: There were 34 patients who underwent laparoscopic gastrectomy for stomach in 2015-2018. Roux-en-Y esophagoenterostomy was used to reconstruct the gastrointestinal tract. Manual anastomoses were performed in 18 patients (group 1), stapled anastomoses (endogia 45 mm, covidien, mansfield, ma, usa) - in 16 patients (group 2). There was no randomization. Surgery duration, length of icu-stay, terms of enteral nutrition initiation, postoperative complications, hospital-stay were analyzed. RESULTS: Mean duration of surgery in the first group was 217 (184-302) min, in the second group - 201 (162-311) min. Duration of surgery in the first group was 1.08-fold higher than in the second group (95% CI 1.03-1.13, p=0.05). Mean blood loss was 145 ml in both groups. Mean icu-stay was 20.2 (17-42) hours in the first group and 21.1 (16.2-46) hours in the second group (ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.92-1.01, p=0.06). Total enteral feeding (sipping) was initiated on the third day in both groups. Mean postoperative hospital-stay was 9.21 (6-13) days in the first group and 9.23 (6-12 days) days in the second group (ratio 0.99, 95% CI 0,95-1.02, p=0.06). Postoperative morbidity was 5.5% in the first group and 6.25% in the second group. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic manual esophagoenterostomy proposed by our surgical team does not have disadvantages in comparison with stapling anastomotic devices and these methods may be alternative to each other.


Subject(s)
Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y/methods , Esophagus/surgery , Gastrectomy/methods , Jejunum/surgery , Stomach Neoplasms/surgery , Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y/instrumentation , Humans , Laparoscopy , Surgical Stapling , Treatment Outcome
17.
Syst Rev ; 9(1): 98, 2020 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455999

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Gasless laparoscopy, developed in the early 1990s, was a means to minimize the clinical and financial challenges of pneumoperitoneum and general anaesthesia. It has been used in a variety of procedures such as in general surgery and gynecology procedures including diagnostic laparoscopy. There has been increasing evidence of the utility of gasless laparoscopy in resource limited settings where diagnostic imaging is not available. In addition, it may help save costs for hospitals. The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence surrounding the safety and efficiency of gasless laparoscopy compared to conventional laparoscopy and open techniques and to analyze the benefits that gasless laparoscopy has for low resource setting hospitals. METHODS: This protocol is developed by following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis-Protocols (PRISMA-P). The PRISMA statement guidelines and flowchart will be used to conduct the study itself. MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Central, and Global Index Medicus (WHO) will be searched and the National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials database. The articles that will be found will be pooled into Covidence article manager software where all the records will be screened for eligibility and duplicates removed. A data extraction spreadsheet will be developed based on variables of interest set a priori. Reviewers will then screen all included studies based on the eligibility criteria. The GRADE tool will be used to assess the quality of the studies and the risk of bias in all the studies will be assessed using the Cochrane Risk assessment tool. The RoB II tool will assed the risk of bias in randomized control studies and the ROBINS I will be used for the non-randomized studies. DISCUSSION: This study will be a comprehensive review on all published articles found using this search strategy on the safety and efficiency of the use of gasless laparoscopy. The systematic review outcomes will include safety and efficiency of gasless laparoscopy compared to the use of conventional laparoscopy or laparotomy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study has been registered in PROSPERO under registration number: CRD42017078338.


Subject(s)
Laparoscopy , Abdomen , Anesthesia, General , Humans , Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial , Systematic Reviews as Topic , United States
18.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 27(6): 1256-1257, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454310

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a surgical video wherein a robot-assisted colostomy takedown was performed with anastomosis of the descending colon to the rectum after reduction of ventral hernias and extensive lysis of adhesions. DESIGN: Case report and a step-by-step video demonstration of a robot-assisted colostomy takedown and end-to-side anastomosis. SETTING: Tertiary referral center in New Haven, Connecticut. A 64-year-old female was diagnosed with stage IIIA endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma in 2015 when she underwent an optimal cytoreductive surgery. In addition, she required resection of the sigmoid colon and a descending end colostomy with Hartmann's pouch, mainly secondary to extensive diverticulitis. After adjuvant chemoradiation, she remained disease free and desired colostomy reversal. Body mass index at the time was 32 kg/m2. Computed tomography of her abdomen and pelvis did not show any evidence of recurrence but was notable for a large ventral hernia and a parastomal hernia. She then underwent a colonoscopy, which was negative for any pathologic condition, except for some narrowing of the distal rectum above the level of the levator ani. INTERVENTIONS: Enterolysis was extensive and took approximately 2 hours. The splenic flexure of the colon had to be mobilized to provide an adequate proximal limb to the anastomosis site. An anvil was then introduced into the distal descending colon through the colostomy site. A robotic stapler was used to seal the colostomy site and detach it from the anterior abdominal wall. Unfortunately, the 28-mm EEA sizer (Covidien, Dublin, Ireland) perforated through the distal rectum, caudal to the stricture site. A substantial length of the distal rectum had to be sacrificed secondary to the perforation, which mandated further mobilization of the splenic flexure. The rectum was then reapproximated with a 3-0 barbed suture in 2 layers. This provided us with approximately 6- to 8-cm distal rectum. An end-to-side anastomosis of the descending colon to the distal rectum was performed. Anastomotic integrity was confirmed using the bubble test. Because of the lower colorectal anastomosis, a protective diverting loop ileostomy was performed. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. A hypaque enema performed 3 months after the colostomy takedown showed no evidence of anastomotic leak or stricture. The ileostomy was then reversed without any complications. CONCLUSION: Robot-assisted colostomy takedown and anastomosis of the descending colon to rectum were successfully performed. Although there is a paucity of literature examining this technique within gynecologic surgery, the literature on general surgery has supported laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal and has demonstrated improved rates of postoperative complications and incisional hernia and reduced duration of hospitalization [1]. Minimally invasive technique is a feasible alternative to laparotomy for gynecologic oncology patients who undergo colostomy, as long as the patients are recurrence free.


Subject(s)
Colostomy/adverse effects , Hernia, Ventral/etiology , Hernia, Ventral/surgery , Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods , Tissue Adhesions/etiology , Tissue Adhesions/surgery , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Anastomosis, Surgical/methods , Anastomotic Leak/surgery , Colon, Sigmoid/pathology , Colon, Sigmoid/surgery , Colonic Pouches/adverse effects , Colostomy/methods , Female , Humans , Laparoscopy/methods , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/surgery , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , Reoperation/methods , Severity of Illness Index
19.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 27(5): 1014-1016, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate our application of the ghost ileostomy in the setting of laparoscopic segmental bowel resection for symptomatic bowel endometriosis nodule. DESIGN: Technical step-by-step surgical video description (educative video) SETTING: University Tertiary Hospital. Institutional Review Board ruled that approval was not required for this study. Endometriosis affects the bowel in 3% to 37% of all cases, and in 90% of these cases, the rectum or sigmoid colon is also involved. Infiltration up to the rectal mucosa and invasion of >50% of the circumference have been suggested as an indication for bowel resection [1]. Apart from general risks (bleeding, infection, direct organ injuries) and bowel and bladder dysfunctions, anastomotic leakage is one of the most severe complications. In women with bowel and vaginal mucosa endometriosis involvement, there is a risk of rectovaginal fistula after concomitant rectum and vagina resections. Hence, for lower colorectal anastomosis, the use of temporary protective ileostomy is usually recommended to prevent these complications but carries on stoma-related risks, such as hernia, retraction, dehydration, prolapse, and necrosis. Ghost ileostomy is a specific technique, first described in 2010, that gives an easy and safe option to prevent anastomotic leakage with maximum preservation of the patient's quality of life [2]. In case of anastomotic leakage, the ghost (or virtual) ileostomy is converted, under local anesthesia, into a loop (real) ileostomy by extracting the isolated loop through an adequate abdominal wall opening. In principle, avoiding readmission for performing the closure of the ileostomy, with all the costs related, means a considerable saving for the hospital management. Also, applying a protective rectal tube in intestinal anastomosis may have a beneficial effect [3]. These options are performed by general surgeons in oncological scenarios, but their use in endometriosis has never been described. INTERVENTIONS: In a 32-year-old woman with intense dysmenorrhea, deep dyspareunia, dyschesia, and cyclic rectal bleeding, a complete laparoscopic approach was performed using blunt and sharp dissection with cold scissors, bipolar dissector and a 5-mm LigaSure Advance (Covidien, Valley lab, Norwalk, Connecticut). An extensive adhesiolysis restoring the pelvic anatomy and endometriosis excision was done. Afterward, the segmental bowel resection was performed using linear and circular endo-anal stapler technique with immediate end-to-end bowel anastomosis and transit reconstitution. Once anastomosis was done, the terminal ileal loop was identified, and a window was made in the adjacent mesentery. Then, an elastic tape (vessel loop) was passed around the ileal loop, brought out of the abdomen through the right iliac fossa 5-mm port site incision and, fixed to the abdominal wall using nonabsorbable stitches. Finally, a trans-anal tube was placed for 5 days. The patient was discharged on the fifth day postoperatively without any complications. The tape was removed 10 days after surgery, and the loop dropped back. Two months after the intervention, the patient remains asymptomatic. CONCLUSION: Ghost ileostomy is a simple, safe, and feasible technique available in the setting of lower colorectal anastomosis following bowel endometriosis resection.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis/surgery , Ileostomy/methods , Intestinal Diseases/surgery , Laparoscopy/methods , Abdominal Wall/pathology , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Adult , Anal Canal/surgery , Anastomosis, Surgical/methods , Anastomotic Leak , Colon, Sigmoid/surgery , Dysmenorrhea/etiology , Dysmenorrhea/surgery , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/pathology , Female , Humans , Intestinal Diseases/complications , Intestinal Diseases/pathology , Pelvis/pathology , Pelvis/surgery , Rectum/pathology , Rectum/surgery
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