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1.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(1): 46-49, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A private university nursing program established the Initiative for Vital Practice in response to increasing levels of compassion fatigue (CF) and burnout among faculty and staff during an undergraduate program revision and accompanying leadership transitions. METHOD: A pilot mixed-method project evaluated self-management practices meant to mitigate CF among faculty and staff. RESULTS: Faculty and staff (N = 34) identified four primary risk factors for CF, including physical symptoms (14 of 34 = 41%); feeling trapped in work (14 of 34 = 41%); lacking time away from work (11 of 34 = 32%); and inability to work hard enough (10 of 34 = 29%). Individual and organizational stressors and alleviators were analyzed; aggregate scores for three Professional Quality of Life scales presented at a "moderate level." CONCLUSION: Preliminary results establish a baseline to measure the effect of burnout and secondary stress and guide further development of our organizational framework and initiative. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(1):46-49.].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Compassion Fatigue , Empathy , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Leadership , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Ann Lab Med ; 42(3): 321-330, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613542

ABSTRACT

Background: A bibliometric analysis of the Annals of Laboratory Medicine (ALM) was performed to understand its position in the medical laboratory technology category and to suggest a developmental strategy. Methods: Journal metrics, including the number of articles by publication type, country of authors, total citations, 2-year impact factor, country of cited authors, journals citing ALM, and Hirsch-index, were obtained from the Journal Citation Report and Web of Science Core Collection. Target data included ALM content in the Web of Science from January 1, 2012, to October 5, 2021. Bibliometric analysis was performed using Biblioshiny. Results: The impact factor increased from 1.481 in 2013 to 3.464 in 2020. Authors belonging to the USA, China, and Korea cited ALM articles the most. Plos One, Scientific Reports, and Frontiers in Microbiology most frequently cited ALM, besides ALM itself. The Hirsch-index was 34. The co-occurrence network of Keyword Plus indicated four clusters: diagnosis, identification, prevalence, and risk. The conceptual structure map of Keyword Plus based on multiple correspondence analysis showed two clusters: bacterial susceptibility at the bench and clinical courses. The co-citation network showed that ALM was in the cluster of the New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, JAMA, and the Annals of Internal Medicine. The collaboration network showed that Korean authors collaborated mainly with authors from the USA, Germany, and Italy. Conclusions: The journal's promotion to an international top-tier journal has been successful. "Principles of transparency and best practice in scholarly publishing" and a preprint policy are yet to be added.


Subject(s)
Leadership , Medical Laboratory Science , Bibliometrics , Humans , Italy , Laboratories
3.
Anesth Analg ; 133(6): 1497-1509, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607763

ABSTRACT

Research has shown that women have leadership ability equal to or better than that of their male counterparts, yet proportionally fewer women than men achieve leadership positions and promotion in medicine. The Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative (WELI) was founded within the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) in 2018 as a multidimensional program to help address the significant career development, leadership, and promotion gender gap between men and women in anesthesiology. Herein, we describe WELI's development and implementation with an early assessment of effectiveness at 2 years. Members received an anonymous, voluntary survey by e-mail to assess whether they believed WELI was beneficial in several broad domains: career development, networking, project implementation and completion, goal setting, mentorship, well-being, and promotion and leadership. The response rate was 60.5% (92 of 152). The majority ranked several aspects of WELI to be very or extremely valuable, including the protégé-advisor dyads, workshops, nomination to join WELI, and virtual facilitated networking. For most members, WELI helped to improve optimism about their professional future. Most also reported that WELI somewhat or absolutely contributed to project improvement or completion, finding new collaborators, and obtaining invitations to be visiting speakers. Among those who applied for promotion or leadership positions, 51% found WELI to be somewhat or absolutely valuable to their application process, and 42% found the same in applying for leadership positions. Qualitative analysis of free-text survey responses identified 5 main themes: (1) feelings of empowerment and confidence, (2) acquisition of new skills in mentoring, coaching, career development, and project implementation, (3) clarification and focus on goal setting, (4) creating meaningful connections through networking, and (5) challenges from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the inability to sustain the advisor-protégé connection. We conclude that after 2 years, the WELI program has successfully supported career development for the majority of protégés and advisors. Continued assessment of whether WELI can meaningfully contribute to attainment of promotion and leadership positions will require study across a longer period. WELI could serve as a programmatic example to support women's career development in other subspecialties.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists , Empowerment , Gender Equity , Leadership , Pediatricians , Physicians, Women , Sexism , Women, Working , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Career Mobility , Female , Humans , Male , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Staff Development , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 743748, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607720

ABSTRACT

Strong leadership in public sector innovation can empower governments to address community challenges in new ways in light of the challenges posed by the global coronavirus pandemic. Coronavirus management policy, pandemic responses, needs, and options are reflected in various Asian countries in respective published literature, but a summarized synthesis is not available. Using a systematic review approach (PRISMA), this study has analyzed the role of leadership in public sector innovation in COVID-19 management and synthesized 23 articles from 23 different Asian countries. In the light of available data, public sector innovation (PSI) and the role played by the leadership of each country' have been found to be largely inter-dependent. The current review provides a cross-section of the ongoing nature of the pandemic, as management responses and trend data in the countries are still emerging or evolving. Additionally, our study contributes a current state report regarding the barriers facing the leadership of Asian countries in mitigating the global pandemic through PSI. Our study found that a strong political leadership presence combined with a technocratic approach and a highly-skilled public sector workforce, could lead to more tremendous success in managing the outbreak. Furthermore, religious leadership was also found to have a potentially significant role in COVID-19 management strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Sector , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(1): 6-7, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594634

ABSTRACT

This month's column highlights health system priorities for advanced practice leaders and advanced practice infrastructure and support.


Subject(s)
Advanced Practice Nursing , Health Priorities , Leadership , Nurse Administrators , COVID-19 , Humans
7.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 5, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593268
8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 765501, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591734

ABSTRACT

Introduction: During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic there have been much publicised shortages in Personal Protective Equipment for frontline health care workers, from masks to gowns. Recent previous airborne pandemics provide an opportunity to learn how to effectively lead and manage supply chains during crisis situations. Identifying and plotting this learning against time will reveal what has been learnt, when and, significantly, what can be learnt for the future. Aims: (i) To identify the temporal trajectory of leadership and management learning in health supply chain management through pandemics and (ii) to identify leadership and management lessons to enable the resilient supply of key items such as PPE in future pandemics. Methods: We undertook a scoping review in line with PRISMA (scoping review extension) searching Business Source Premier, Health Business Elite, Medline, ProQuest Business Collection and PubMed. Search terms were focused on recent airborne pandemics (SARS; Ebola; Zika virus; H1N1 swine flu, COVID-19), supply chain management, PPE, leadership, learning, inhibitors and facilitators and resilience e.g., SARS AND supply chain* AND ("personal protective equipment" OR PPE) (leaders* OR manage*) Titles and abstracts were downloaded to Endnote and duplicates removed. Two authors independently screened all of the titles and abstracts. Inclusion criteria focused on leadership and management in health supply chains during pandemics, peer reviewed or grey literature (either from business journals or reports): exclusion criteria included not in English and not focused on a named pandemic. Once interrater reliability was assured, authors completed a title and abstract screening independently. Ten percent of the resultant full text articles were screened by both authors, once agreement was reached the full text articles were screened independently noting reasons for exclusion. A data extraction tool was designed to capture findings from the final articles included in the review. Results/Discussion: We found 92 articles and, after screening, included 30 full text articles. The majority were focused on COVID-19 (N = 27) and most were from the USA (N = 13). We identified four themes related to leadership and management of pandemic PPE supply chains, (i) Leadership and management learning for pandemic PPE supply chain management, (ii) Inhibitors of PPE supply chain resilience during a pandemic, (iii) Facilitators employed to manage the immediate impacts of PPE supply chain demands during a pandemic,and (iv) Facilitators proposed to ensure longer term resilience of PPE supply chains during pandemics Our study suggests there has been limited leadership and management learning for PPE supply chains from previous pandemics, however there has been extensive learning through the COVID-19 pandemic. Lessons included the importance of planning, the significance of collaboration and relationship building. Resilience of PPE supply chains was reported to be dependent on multiple levels from individuals to organisation level and also interdependent on (i) sustainability, (ii) the practise of PPE and (iii) long term environmental impact of PPE suggesting the need, long term, to move to a circular economy approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus , Animals , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Swine
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580737

ABSTRACT

Little is known about how COVID-19 affects older patients living at home or how it affects district nursing teams providing care to these patients. This study aims to (1) explore, from the perspectives of Dutch district nurses, COVID-19's impact on patients receiving district nursing care, district nursing teams, and their organisations during the first outbreak in March 2020 as well as one year later; and (2) identify the needs of district nurses regarding future outbreaks. A mixed-methods, two-phase, sequential exploratory design was followed. In total, 36 district nurses were interviewed during the first outbreak (March 2020), of which 18 participated in the follow-up questionnaire in April 2021. Thirteen themes emerged, which showed that the COVID pandemic has substantially impacted patient care and district nursing teams. During the first outbreak, nurses played a crucial role in organising care differently and worked under high pressure, leading to exhaustion, tiredness, and psychosocial problems, including fear of infection. A year later, nurses were better prepared to provide COVID care, but problems regarding work pressure and mental complaints remained. The identified needs focus on a sustainable implementation of leadership roles for district nurses. At the organisational and national levels, more support and appreciation are needed in terms of trust and appropriate policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583854

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The health service response to COVID-19 provided a unique opportunity to build our understanding of the leadership styles in use in managing a crisis event. Existing literature emphasises command and control leadership; however, there has been less emphasis on relational approaches and the behaviours necessary to ensure the agility of the response and minimise the risk of relational disturbances. The purpose of this paper is to understand leadership styles in use, as part of a health service response to COVID-19. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: This paper draws on data from semi-structured interviews with 27 executives and senior leaders from a tertiary health service in Australia. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Notes and examples were coded according to deductively derived criteria around leadership styles and competencies from the literature, while remaining open to emergent themes. FINDINGS: Health system leaders described examples of both command and control and relational leadership behaviours. This dually provided the discipline (command and control) and agility (relational) required of the crisis response. While some leaders experienced discomfort in enacting these dual behaviours, this discomfort related to discordance with leadership preferences rather than conflict between the styles. Both leadership approaches were considered necessary to effectively manage the health system response. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Crisis management literature has typically focused on defining and measuring the effectiveness of behaviours reflective of a command and control leadership response. Very few studies have considered the relational aspects of crisis management, nor the dual approaches of command and control, and relational leadership.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Australia , Health Services , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Health Organ Manag ; 35(9): 195-210, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561215

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study seeks to improve the understanding of physician leaders' leadership work challenges. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The subjects of the empirical study were physician leaders (n = 23) in the largest central hospital in Finland. FINDINGS: A total of five largely identity-related, partially paradoxical dilemmas appeared regarding why working as "just a leader" is challenging for physician leaders. First, the dilemma of identity ambiguity between being a physician and a leader. Second, the dilemma of balancing the expected commitment to clinical patient work by various stakeholders and that of physician leadership work. Third, the dilemma of being able to compensate for leadership skill shortcomings by excelling in clinical skills, encouraging physician leaders to commit to patient work. Fourth, the dilemma of "medic discourse", that is, downplaying leadership work as "non-patient work", making it inferior to patient work. Fifth, the dilemma of a perceived ethical obligation to commit to patient work even if the physician leadership work would be a full-time job. The first two issues support the findings of earlier research, while the remaining three emerging from the authors' analysis are novel. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The authors list some of the practical implications that follow from this study and which could help solve some of the challenges. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This study explores physician leaders' leadership work challenges using authentic physician leader data in a context where no prior empirical research has been carried out.


Subject(s)
Leadership , Physicians , Clinical Competence , Employment , Finland , Humans
12.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(11): 3537-3540, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525600

ABSTRACT

As the extent of health disparities in the USA has been revealed, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, physicians have increasingly attended to their roles as advocates for their patients and communities. This article presents "spheres of influence" as a concept that can help physicians think strategically about how to build upon their clinical work and expertise to promote equity in medicine. The physician's primary sphere of influence is in direct patient care. However, physicians today often have many other roles, especially within larger health care institutions in which physicians often occupy positions of authority. Physicians are therefore well-positioned to act within these spheres in ways that draw upon the ethical principles that guide patient care and contribute materially to the cause of equity for colleagues and patients alike. By making changes to the ways they already work within their clinical spaces, institutional leadership roles, and wider communities, physicians can counteract the structural problems that undermine the health of the patients they serve.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Rev. gaúch. enferm ; 42(spe): e20200404, 2021.
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1523507

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective To reflect on the exercise of Nursing's professional autonomy in times of pandemic. Method Theoretical reflection in the light of the Sociology of Professions proposed by Eliot Freidson. Using the author's main concepts, it was sought to understand the professional practice of Nursing in times when its protagonism in the care process becomes even more challenging. Results Although there are obstacles in the daily work, it is believed that an autonomous practice contributes satisfactorily to the performance of nurses, since by revealing all the potential and leadership they have, they allow their professional autonomy to be legitimized. Final Considerations The reflection clarified the importance of nurses to put their professional autonomy into practice, in order to achieve greater recognition and social appreciation of their work in times of pandemic.


RESUMEN Objetivo Reflexionar sobre el ejercicio de la autonomía profesional de la Enfermería en tiempos de pandemia. Método Reflexión teórica a la luz de la Sociología de las Profesiones propuesta por Eliot Freidson. Utilizando los conceptos principales de la autora, buscamos comprender la práctica profesional de la Enfermería en momentos en que su protagonismo en el proceso asistencial se vuelve aún más desafiante. Resultados Si bien existen obstáculos en el trabajo diario, se cree que una práctica autónoma contribuye satisfactoriamente al desempeño de las enfermeiras y los enfermeros, ya que al revelar todo el potencial y liderazgo que tienen, permiten legitimar su autonomía profesional. Consideraciones Finales La reflexión aclaró la importancia de que el enfermero ponga en práctica su autonomía profesional, con el fin de lograr un mayor reconocimiento y valoración social de su trabajo en tiempos de pandemia.


RESUMO Objetivo Refletir sobre o exercício da autonomia profissional da Enfermagem em tempos de pandemia. Método Reflexão teórica à luz da Sociologia das Profissões proposta por Eliot Freidson. Utilizando-se os principais conceitos do autor, buscou-se uma compreensão sobre o exercício profissional da Enfermagem em tempos onde seu protagonismo frente ao processo de cuidar torna-se ainda mais desafiador. Resultados Apesar de existirem obstáculos no cotidiano de trabalho, acredita-se que uma prática autônoma contribui de forma satisfatória para o desempenho de enfermeiras(os), pois, ao revelarem todo o potencial e liderança que possuem, permitem que sua autonomia profissional seja legitimada. Considerações Finais A reflexão esclareceu a importância de enfermeiras(os) colocarem em prática sua autonomia profissional, com o intuito de alcançarem um maior reconhecimento e valorização social do seu trabalho em tempos de pandemia.


Subject(s)
Professional Practice , Professional Autonomy , Pandemics , Nurses , Sociology/education , Coronavirus Infections , Leadership , Nursing Care
14.
Br J Nurs ; 30(20): 1178-1183, 2021 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524632

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) are experienced senior nurses with advanced clinical knowledge, communication and leadership skills and commonly take on extended roles to optimise care delivery within health and social care. AIM: To critically explore the experience of one clinical nurse specialist who undertook an enhanced qualification to become a surgical first assistant. METHODS: A case-study approach based on Gibbs' reflective model is used to reflect on the experience, its benefits to patient care and the challenges and facilitators related to taking on advanced surgical roles. FINDINGS: Long-term benefits can be achieved by investing in CNSs educated to hold the enhanced surgical first assistant qualification. Advanced roles enhance evidence-based service delivery, while also benefitting the clinical nurse specialist, the patient and the trust.


Subject(s)
Nurse Clinicians , Orthopedics , Hospitals , Humans , Leadership
15.
Healthc Q ; 24(3): 1-3, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524629

ABSTRACT

There is no doubt that the events of the past two years will leave an indelible mark on human history. The tragic loss of so many lives during the COVID-19 pandemic, the long-term health and psychological impacts for many more and the economic and societal changes will reverberate for years to come. While the pandemic is not yet over, we are starting to appreciate how different our new future looks and feels. It is within this context that Longwoods Publishing and the Canadian College of Health Leaders (CCHL) have collaborated, for the first time, in a shared reflection on the future of leadership in Canada's healthcare system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Canada , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Healthc Q ; 24(3): 27-30, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524627

ABSTRACT

While the COVID-19 pandemic has been the major focus for healthcare leaders since early 2020, the opioid crisis has been growing in the background. Confronting this emerging problem will require new thinking. Guest editors Anne Wojtak and Neil Stuart spoke with Scott Elliott, executive director, and Patrick McDougall, director of Knowledge Translation and Evaluation, at the Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation in Vancouver to gain their insights into how leaders can respond effectively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Canada , Humans , Opioid Epidemic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Healthc Q ; 24(3): 34-41, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524626

ABSTRACT

Little has been published on successful leadership models within integrated care systems. Within East Toronto Health Partners, there have been considerable efforts at the executive leadership level to empower local leadership, particularly physician leaders, to develop and execute effective solutions across the community. What does distributed leadership look like, and what does it take to implement it? A number of activities demonstrating the impact of a distributed leadership model in East Toronto are outlined in this paper, offering an effective defence against the enormous challenge posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools
18.
Healthc Q ; 24(3): 42-47, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524625

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak offered a unique opportunity to capture the experiences of front-line practitioners during substantial and rapid changes to their daily work, including workplace policy, protocols, environment and culture, as well as changes to their overall professional role in the healthcare system. Our team of paramedic researchers collected data throughout the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak, exploring the lived experiences from a paramedic viewpoint. This article will discuss impactful approaches to leadership in paramedicine - differentiating between successful and failed strategies to leading and supporting teams amid rapid change on the front lines of the fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Allied Health Personnel , Canada , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Healthc Q ; 24(3): 48-52, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524624

ABSTRACT

During crises, leaders must address fear, give people a role and purpose and emphasize experimentation, learning and self-care. A survey of emerging health leaders rated the frequency with which they observed their organizational leaders and themselves engage in these crisis leadership functions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings revealed significant differences between emerging and more experienced leaders' behaviours in acknowledging fears and providing reassurance, managing individual health and role modelling good self-care and encouraging others to practise good self-care. Emerging leaders rated themselves as engaging in these behaviours more frequently. Barriers preventing these practices included heavy workloads and communication issues. Enablers included good team dynamics, clear communication and incorporating technology. Implications for leadership are presented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Communication , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl) ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522488

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In January 2021, India launched the world's most extensive vaccination campaign against COVID-19. It is estimated that India would need to vaccinate over a billion people to achieve herd immunity. Even though the Indian Government focuses on improving and delivering its vaccination programme, significant challenges still exist. This paper aims to discuss current challenges to scale up India's vaccination campaign and addresses strategies for achieving this. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The paper is based on a review of secondary sources, including journal articles from scholarly and grey literature and information available in the public domain. The search focused explicitly on the COVID-19 scenario, vaccination programme, public health management and systems leadership in the Indian health care system. FINDINGS: The analysis revealed that various factors have disrupted India's vaccination campaign, including shortage of vaccine doses, mandatory prior online registration, lack of infrastructure, safety concerns for older people, untrained workforce and absence of a solid public health framework. Furthermore, India appears to have struggled to reduce tensions and instill trust in its ability to effectively manage the COVID-19 pandemic and vaccination programme due to a lack of cooperation between union government, state governments and other stakeholders, namely, policymakers, hospitals, industry and community. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: The findings indicate that scaling up India's anti-COVID vaccination programme would require system-level leadership strategies that work within the country's limited resources. Deeper reforms in vaccine development, storage, delivery, training and regulatory frameworks are also needed to extend the world's largest anti-COVID-19 vaccination campaign.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Humans , India , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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