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1.
J Virol ; 96(7): e0199521, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745826

ABSTRACT

C-type lectin domain-containing proteins (CTLDcps) shape host responses to pathogens and infectious disease outcomes. Previously, we identified the murine CTLDcp Cd302 as restriction factor, limiting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection of murine hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated in detail the human orthologue's ability to restrict HCV infection in human liver cells. CD302 overexpression in Huh-7.5 cells potently inhibited infection of diverse HCV chimeras representing seven genotypes. Transcriptional profiling revealed abundant CD302 mRNA expression in human hepatocytes, the natural cellular target of HCV. Knockdown of endogenously expressed CD302 modestly enhanced HCV infection of Huh-7.5 cells and primary human hepatocytes. Functional analysis of naturally occurring CD302 transcript variants and engineered CD302 mutants showed that the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) is essential for HCV restriction, whereas the cytoplasmic domain (CPD) is dispensable. Coding single nucleotide polymorphisms occurring in human populations and mapping to different domains of CD302 did not influence the capacity of CD302 to restrict HCV. Assessment of the anti-HCV phenotype at different life cycle stages indicated that CD302 preferentially targets the viral entry step. In contrast to the murine orthologue, overexpression of human CD302 did not modulate downstream expression of nuclear receptor-controlled genes. Ectopic CD302 expression restricted infection of liver tropic hepatitis E virus (HEV), while it did not affect infection rates of two respiratory viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the alpha coronavirus HVCoV-229E. Together, these findings suggest that CD302 contributes to liver cell-intrinsic defense against HCV and might mediate broader antiviral defenses against additional hepatotropic viruses. IMPORTANCE The liver represents an immunoprivileged organ characterized by enhanced resistance to immune responses. However, the importance of liver cell-endogenous, noncytolytic innate immune responses in pathogen control is not well defined. Although the role of myeloid cell-expressed CTLDcps in host responses to viruses has been characterized in detail, we have little information about their potential functions in the liver and their relevance for immune responses in this organ. Human hepatocytes endogenously express the CTLDcp CD302. Here, we provide evidence that CD302 limits HCV infection of human liver cells, likely by inhibiting a viral cell entry step. We confirm that the dominant liver-expressed transcript variant, as well as naturally occurring coding variants of CD302, maintain the capacity to restrict HCV. We further show that the CTLD of the protein is critical for the anti-HCV activity and that overexpressed CD302 limits HEV infection. Thus, CD302 likely contributes to human liver-intrinsic antiviral defenses.


Subject(s)
Hepacivirus , Hepatitis C , Animals , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Asialoglycoprotein Receptor/metabolism , Hepacivirus/physiology , Hepatitis C/metabolism , Hepatocytes , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/genetics , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Mice , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Virus Replication
2.
Cell ; 185(4): 614-629.e21, 2022 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676664

ABSTRACT

Activation of the innate immune system via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is key to generate lasting adaptive immunity. PRRs detect unique chemical patterns associated with invading microorganisms, but whether and how the physical properties of PRR ligands influence the development of the immune response remains unknown. Through the study of fungal mannans, we show that the physical form of PRR ligands dictates the immune response. Soluble mannans are immunosilent in the periphery but elicit a potent pro-inflammatory response in the draining lymph node (dLN). By modulating the physical form of mannans, we developed a formulation that targets both the periphery and the dLN. When combined with viral glycoprotein antigens, this mannan formulation broadens epitope recognition, elicits potent antigen-specific neutralizing antibodies, and confers protection against viral infections of the lung. Thus, the physical properties of microbial ligands determine the outcome of the immune response and can be harnessed for vaccine development.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , Candida albicans/chemistry , Mannans/immunology , Aluminum Hydroxide/chemistry , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibody Specificity/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Epitopes/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Immunization , Inflammation/pathology , Interferons/metabolism , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Ligands , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lymph Nodes/immunology , Lymph Nodes/metabolism , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Paranasal Sinuses/metabolism , Protein Subunits/metabolism , Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 1/metabolism , Solubility , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Transcription Factor RelB/metabolism , Vero Cells , beta-Glucans/metabolism
3.
J Med Chem ; 64(19): 14332-14343, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621195

ABSTRACT

In addition to a variety of viral-glycoprotein receptors (e.g., heparan sulfate, Niemann-Pick C1, etc.), dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), from the C-type lectin receptor family, plays one of the most important pathogenic functions for a wide range of viruses (e.g., Ebola, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, etc.) that invade host cells before replication; thus, its inhibition represents a relevant extracellular antiviral therapy. We report two novel p-tBu-calixarene glycoclusters 1 and 2, bearing tetrahydroxamic acid groups, which exhibit micromolar inhibition of soluble DC-SIGN binding and provide nanomolar IC50 inhibition of both DC-SIGN-dependent Jurkat cis-cell infection by viral particle pseudotyped with Ebola virus glycoprotein and the HCMV-gB-recombinant glycoprotein interaction with monocyte-derived dendritic cells expressing DC-SIGN. A unique cooperative involvement of sugar, linker, and calixarene core is likely behind the strong avidity of DC-SIGN for these low-valent systems. We claim herein new promising candidates for the rational development of a large spectrum of antiviral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Calixarenes/chemistry , Cell Adhesion Molecules/antagonists & inhibitors , Glycoconjugates/metabolism , Glycoproteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Hydroxamic Acids/chemistry , Lectins, C-Type/antagonists & inhibitors , Phenols/chemistry , Receptors, Cell Surface/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Line , Cytomegalovirus/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/cytology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Ebolavirus/physiology , Glycoconjugates/chemistry , Glycoconjugates/pharmacology , Glycoproteins/genetics , Glycoproteins/metabolism , Humans , Jurkat Cells , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Models, Biological , Protein Binding , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/biosynthesis , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/isolation & purification , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
4.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538383

ABSTRACT

Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and their function is essential to configure adaptative immunity and avoid excessive inflammation. DCs are predicted to play a crucial role in the clinical evolution of the infection by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV)-2. DCs interaction with the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein, which mediates cell receptor binding and subsequent fusion of the viral particle with host cell, is a key step to induce effective immunity against this virus and in the S protein-based vaccination protocols. Here we evaluated human DCs in response to SARS-CoV-2 S protein, or to a fragment encompassing the receptor binding domain (RBD) challenge. Both proteins increased the expression of maturation markers, including MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors. DCs interaction with the SARS-CoV-2 S protein promotes activation of key signaling molecules involved in inflammation, including MAPK, AKT, STAT1, and NFκB, which correlates with the expression and secretion of distinctive proinflammatory cytokines. Differences in the expression of ACE2 along the differentiation of human monocytes to mature DCs and inter-donor were found. Our results show that SARS-CoV-2 S protein promotes inflammatory response and provides molecular links between individual variations and the degree of response against this virus.


Subject(s)
Dendritic Cells/pathology , Dendritic Cells/virology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Protein Domains , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , STAT Transcription Factors/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Tissue Donors
5.
Front Immunol ; 12: 732298, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506693

ABSTRACT

Immune modulating therapies and vaccines are in high demand, not least to the recent global spread of SARS-CoV2. To achieve efficient activation of the immune system, professional antigen presenting cells have proven to be key coordinators of such responses. Especially targeted approaches, actively directing antigens to specialized dendritic cells, promise to be more effective and accompanied by reduced payload due to less off-target effects. Although antibody and glycan-based targeting of receptors on dendritic cells have been employed, these are often expensive and time-consuming to manufacture or lack sufficient specificity. Thus, we applied a small-molecule ligand that specifically binds Langerin, a hallmark receptor on Langerhans cells, conjugated to a model protein antigen. Via microneedle injection, this construct was intradermally administered into intact human skin explants, selectively loading Langerhans cells in the epidermis. The ligand-mediated cellular uptake outpaces protein degradation resulting in intact antigen delivery. Due to the pivotal role of Langerhans cells in induction of immune responses, this approach of antigen-targeting of tissue-resident immune cells offers a novel way to deliver highly effective vaccines with minimally invasive administration.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens/administration & dosage , Green Fluorescent Proteins/administration & dosage , Langerhans Cells/metabolism , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Mannose-Binding Lectins/metabolism , Animals , Antigens/immunology , Antigens/metabolism , COS Cells , Chlorocebus aethiops , Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Injections, Intradermal , Langerhans Cells/immunology , Ligands , Miniaturization , Nanomedicine , Needles , Protein Binding , Protein Transport , Proteolysis , THP-1 Cells , Vaccines, Subunit/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology , Vaccines, Subunit/metabolism
6.
J Cell Physiol ; 237(2): 1521-1531, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490820

ABSTRACT

Mechanical forces can modulate the immune response, mostly described as promoting the activation of immune cells, but the role and mechanism of pathological levels of mechanical stress in lymphocyte activation have not been focused on before. By an ex vivo experimental approach, we observed that mechanical stressing of murine spleen lymphocytes with 50 mmHg for 3 h induced the nuclear localization of NFAT1, increased C-Jun, and increased the expression of early activation marker CD69 in resting CD8+ cells. Interestingly, 50 mmHg mechanical stressing induced the nuclear localization of NFAT1; but conversely decreased C-Jun and inhibited the expression of CD69 in lymphocytes under lipopolysaccharide or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin stimulation. Additionally, we observed similar changes trends when comparing RNA-seq data of hypertensive and normotensive COVID-19 patients. Our results indicate a biphasic effect of mechanical stress on lymphocyte activation, which provides insight into the variety of immune responses in pathologies involving elevated mechanical stress.


Subject(s)
Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Stress, Mechanical , Animals , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte/metabolism , Biomarkers/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Cell Nucleus/drug effects , Cell Nucleus/metabolism , Comorbidity , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Ion Channels/metabolism , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Lymphocyte Activation/genetics , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , NFATC Transcription Factors/metabolism , Protein Transport/drug effects , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-jun/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate/pharmacology
7.
J Am Chem Soc ; 143(42): 17465-17478, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469951

ABSTRACT

The C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN is a pattern recognition receptor expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. It has been identified as a promiscuous entry receptor for many pathogens, including epidemic and pandemic viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, Ebola virus, and HIV-1. In the context of the recent SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, DC-SIGN-mediated virus dissemination and stimulation of innate immune responses has been implicated as a potential factor in the development of severe COVID-19. Inhibition of virus binding to DC-SIGN, thus, represents an attractive host-directed strategy to attenuate overshooting innate immune responses and prevent the progression of the disease. In this study, we report on the discovery of a new class of potent glycomimetic DC-SIGN antagonists from a focused library of triazole-based mannose analogues. Structure-based optimization of an initial screening hit yielded a glycomimetic ligand with a more than 100-fold improved binding affinity compared to methyl α-d-mannopyranoside. Analysis of binding thermodynamics revealed an enthalpy-driven improvement of binding affinity that was enabled by hydrophobic interactions with a loop region adjacent to the binding site and displacement of a conserved water molecule. The identified ligand was employed for the synthesis of multivalent glycopolymers that were able to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein binding to DC-SIGN-expressing cells, as well as DC-SIGN-mediated trans-infection of ACE2+ cells by SARS-CoV-2 spike protein-expressing viruses, in nanomolar concentrations. The identified glycomimetic ligands reported here open promising perspectives for the development of highly potent and fully selective DC-SIGN-targeted therapeutics for a broad spectrum of viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
8.
Immunity ; 54(9): 2133-2142.e3, 2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433401

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines have shown remarkable clinical efficacy, but questions remain about the nature and kinetics of T cell priming. We performed longitudinal antigen-specific T cell analyses on healthy SARS-CoV-2-naive and recovered individuals prior to and following mRNA prime and boost vaccination. Vaccination induced rapid antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in naive subjects after the first dose, whereas CD8+ T cell responses developed gradually and were variable in magnitude. Vaccine-induced Th1 and Tfh cell responses following the first dose correlated with post-boost CD8+ T cells and neutralizing antibodies, respectively. Integrated analysis revealed coordinated immune responses with distinct trajectories in SARS-CoV-2-naive and recovered individuals. Last, whereas booster vaccination improved T cell responses in SARS-CoV-2-naive subjects, the second dose had little effect in SARS-CoV-2-recovered individuals. These findings highlight the role of rapidly primed CD4+ T cells in coordinating responses to the second vaccine dose in SARS-CoV-2-naive individuals.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte/metabolism , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Immunization, Secondary , Immunologic Memory , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Peptides/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Young Adult
9.
Glycoconj J ; 38(5): 611-623, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427319

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection displays a wide array of clinical manifestations. Although some risk factors for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity and outcomes have been identified the underlying biologic mechanisms are still not well understood. The surface SARS-CoV-2 proteins are heavily glycosylated enabling host cell interaction and viral entry. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been identified to be the main host cell receptor enabling SARS-CoV-2 cell entry after interaction with its S glycoprotein. However, recent studies report SARS-CoV-2 S glycoprotein interaction with other cell receptors, mainly C-type lectins which recognize specific glycan epitopes facilitating SARS-CoV-2 entry to susceptible cells. Here, we are summarizing the main findings on SARS-CoV-2 interactions with ACE2 and other cell membrane surface receptors and soluble lectins involved in the viral cell entry modulating its infectivity and potentially playing a role in subsequent clinical manifestations of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Glycoproteins/metabolism , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Glycosylation , Humans
10.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408625

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is caused by an enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus, referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which belongs to the realm Riboviria, order Nidovirales, family Coronaviridae, genus Betacoronavirus and the species Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus. This viral disease is characterized by a myriad of varying symptoms, such as pyrexia, cough, hemoptysis, dyspnoea, diarrhea, muscle soreness, dysosmia, lymphopenia and dysgeusia amongst others. The virus mainly infects humans, various other mammals, avian species and some other companion livestock. SARS-CoV-2 cellular entry is primarily accomplished by molecular interaction between the virus's spike (S) protein and the host cell surface receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), although other host cell-associated receptors/factors, such as neuropilin 1 (NRP-1) and neuropilin 2 (NRP-2), C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), as well as proteases such as TMPRSS2 (transmembrane serine protease 2) and furin, might also play a crucial role in infection, tropism, pathogenesis and clinical outcome. Furthermore, several structural and non-structural proteins of the virus themselves are very critical in determining the clinical outcome following infection. Considering such critical role(s) of the abovementioned host cell receptors, associated proteases/factors and virus structural/non-structural proteins (NSPs), it may be quite prudent to therapeutically target them through a multipronged clinical regimen to combat the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Host Microbial Interactions , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Delivery Systems , Furin/chemistry , Furin/metabolism , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/chemistry , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Molecular Structure , Neuropilins/chemistry , Neuropilins/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Treatment Outcome , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Internalization
11.
Nature ; 598(7880): 342-347, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379317

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection-which involves both cell attachment and membrane fusion-relies on the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, which is paradoxically found at low levels in the respiratory tract1-3, suggesting that there may be additional mechanisms facilitating infection. Here we show that C-type lectin receptors, DC-SIGN, L-SIGN and the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 1 (SIGLEC1) function as attachment receptors by enhancing ACE2-mediated infection and modulating the neutralizing activity of different classes of spike-specific antibodies. Antibodies to the amino-terminal domain or to the conserved site at the base of the receptor-binding domain, while poorly neutralizing infection of ACE2-overexpressing cells, effectively block lectin-facilitated infection. Conversely, antibodies to the receptor binding motif, while potently neutralizing infection of ACE2-overexpressing cells, poorly neutralize infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN or L-SIGN and trigger fusogenic rearrangement of the spike, promoting cell-to-cell fusion. Collectively, these findings identify a lectin-dependent pathway that enhances ACE2-dependent infection by SARS-CoV-2 and reveal distinct mechanisms of neutralization by different classes of spike-specific antibodies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Lectins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Fusion , Cell Line , Cricetinae , Female , Humans , Lectins/immunology , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Membrane Fusion , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 1/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(17)2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374426

ABSTRACT

The current spreading coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is highly infectious and pathogenic. In this study, we screened the gene expression of three host receptors (ACE2, DC-SIGN and L-SIGN) of SARS coronaviruses and dendritic cells (DCs) status in bulk and single cell transcriptomic datasets of upper airway, lung or blood of COVID-19 patients and healthy controls. In COVID-19 patients, DC-SIGN gene expression was interestingly decreased in lung DCs but increased in blood DCs. Within DCs, conventional DCs (cDCs) were depleted while plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) were augmented in the lungs of mild COVID-19. In severe cases, we identified augmented types of immature DCs (CD22+ or ANXA1+ DCs) with MHCII downregulation. In this study, our observation indicates that DCs in severe cases stimulate innate immune responses but fail to specifically present SARS-CoV-2. It provides insights into the profound modulation of DC function in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Lectins, C-Type/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Datasets as Topic , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Genome-Wide Association Study , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Nasopharynx/immunology , Nasopharynx/pathology , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA-Seq , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis
13.
JCI Insight ; 6(14)2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320462

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), remains a pandemic. Severe disease is associated with dysfunction of multiple organs, but some infected cells do not express ACE2, the canonical entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Here, we report that the C-type lectin receptor L-SIGN interacted in a Ca2+-dependent manner with high-mannose-type N-glycans on the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We found that L-SIGN was highly expressed on human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and lymph node lymphatic endothelial cells but not on blood endothelial cells. Using high-resolution confocal microscopy imaging, we detected SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins within the LSECs from liver autopsy samples from patients with COVID-19. We found that both pseudo-typed virus enveloped with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and authentic SARS-CoV-2 virus infected L-SIGN-expressing cells relative to control cells. Moreover, blocking L-SIGN function reduced CoV-2-type infection. These results indicate that L-SIGN is a receptor for SARS-CoV-2 infection. LSECs are major sources of the clotting factors vWF and factor VIII (FVIII). LSECs from liver autopsy samples from patients with COVID-19 expressed substantially higher levels of vWF and FVIII than LSECs from uninfected liver samples. Our data demonstrate that L-SIGN is an endothelial cell receptor for SARS-CoV-2 that may contribute to COVID-19-associated coagulopathy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Capillaries , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Endothelial Cells , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Liver/blood supply , Lymphatic Vessels , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Capillaries/metabolism , Capillaries/pathology , Capillaries/virology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Humans , Liver/pathology , Lymphatic Vessels/metabolism , Lymphatic Vessels/pathology , Lymphatic Vessels/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Virus Internalization
14.
ChemMedChem ; 16(15): 2345-2353, 2021 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248684

ABSTRACT

The C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN mediates interactions with envelope glycoproteins of many viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, ebola, and HIV and contributes to virus internalization and dissemination. In the context of the recent SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, involvement of DC-SIGN has been linked to severe cases of COVID-19. Inhibition of the interaction between DC-SIGN and viral glycoproteins has the potential to generate broad spectrum antiviral agents. Here, we demonstrate that mannose-functionalized poly-l-lysine glycoconjugates efficiently inhibit the attachment of viral glycoproteins to DC-SIGN-presenting cells with picomolar affinity. Treatment of these cells leads to prolonged receptor internalization and inhibition of virus binding for up to 6 h. Furthermore, the polymers are fully bio-compatible and readily cleared by target cells. The thermodynamic analysis of the multivalent interactions reveals enhanced enthalpy-driven affinities and promising perspectives for the future development of multivalent therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/antagonists & inhibitors , Glycoconjugates/pharmacology , Lectins, C-Type/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Cell Surface/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Attachment/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Glycoconjugates/chemical synthesis , Glycoconjugates/metabolism , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Mannose/analogs & derivatives , Mannose/metabolism , Mannose/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Polylysine/analogs & derivatives , Polylysine/metabolism , Polylysine/pharmacology , Protein Binding/drug effects , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , THP-1 Cells , Thermodynamics , Viral Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism
15.
J Biol Chem ; 297(1): 100847, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246014

ABSTRACT

The zoonotic transmission of highly pathogenic coronaviruses into the human population is a pressing concern highlighted by the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Recent work has helped to illuminate much about the mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 entry into the cell, which determines host- and tissue-specific tropism, pathogenicity, and zoonotic transmission. Here we discuss current findings on the factors governing SARS-CoV-2 entry. We first reviewed key features of the viral spike protein (S) mediating fusion of the viral envelope and host cell membrane through binding to the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. We then examined the roles of host proteases including transmembrane protease serine 2 and cathepsins in processing S for virus entry and the impact of this processing on endosomal and plasma membrane virus entry routes. We further discussed recent work on several host cofactors that enhance SARS-CoV-2 entry including Neuropilin-1, CD147, phosphatidylserine receptors, heparan sulfate proteoglycans, sialic acids, and C-type lectins. Finally, we discussed two key host restriction factors, i.e., interferon-induced transmembrane proteins and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus E, which can disrupt SARS-CoV-2 entry. The features of SARS-CoV-2 are presented in the context of other human coronaviruses, highlighting unique aspects. In addition, we identify the gaps in understanding of SARS-CoV-2 entry that will need to be addressed by future studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization , Animals , Basigin/genetics , Basigin/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/genetics , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
16.
Immunity ; 54(6): 1304-1319.e9, 2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246001

ABSTRACT

Despite mounting evidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) engagement with immune cells, most express little, if any, of the canonical receptor of SARS-CoV-2, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Here, using a myeloid cell receptor-focused ectopic expression screen, we identified several C-type lectins (DC-SIGN, L-SIGN, LSECtin, ASGR1, and CLEC10A) and Tweety family member 2 (TTYH2) as glycan-dependent binding partners of the SARS-CoV-2 spike. Except for TTYH2, these molecules primarily interacted with spike via regions outside of the receptor-binding domain. Single-cell RNA sequencing analysis of pulmonary cells from individuals with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) indicated predominant expression of these molecules on myeloid cells. Although these receptors do not support active replication of SARS-CoV-2, their engagement with the virus induced robust proinflammatory responses in myeloid cells that correlated with COVID-19 severity. We also generated a bispecific anti-spike nanobody that not only blocked ACE2-mediated infection but also the myeloid receptor-mediated proinflammatory responses. Our findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2-myeloid receptor interactions promote immune hyperactivation, which represents potential targets for COVID-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Myeloid Cells/metabolism , Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , Cell Line , Cytokines , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Lectins, C-Type/chemistry , Membrane Proteins/chemistry , Models, Molecular , Neoplasm Proteins/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Single-Domain Antibodies/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship
17.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(5): e1009576, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236599

ABSTRACT

The efficient spread of SARS-CoV-2 resulted in a unique pandemic in modern history. Despite early identification of ACE2 as the receptor for viral spike protein, much remains to be understood about the molecular events behind viral dissemination. We evaluated the contribution of C-type lectin receptors (CLRS) of antigen-presenting cells, widely present in respiratory mucosa and lung tissue. DC-SIGN, L-SIGN, Langerin and MGL bind to diverse glycans of the spike using multiple interaction areas. Using pseudovirus and cells derived from monocytes or T-lymphocytes, we demonstrate that while virus capture by the CLRs examined does not allow direct cell infection, DC/L-SIGN, among these receptors, promote virus transfer to permissive ACE2+ Vero E6 cells. A glycomimetic compound designed against DC-SIGN, enable inhibition of this process. These data have been then confirmed using authentic SARS-CoV-2 virus and human respiratory cell lines. Thus, we described a mechanism potentiating viral spreading of infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Animals , Antigens, CD/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Jurkat Cells , Lung/metabolism , Mannose-Binding Lectins/metabolism , Mannosides/pharmacology , Protein Binding/drug effects , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Vero Cells
18.
J Infect Dis ; 224(Supplement_6): S631-S641, 2021 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195718

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) binding receptor ACE2 and the spike protein priming protease TMPRSS2 are coexpressed in human placentae. It is unknown whether their expression is altered in the context of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART). METHODS: We compared mRNA levels of SARS-CoV-2 cell-entry mediators ACE2, TMPRSS2, and L-SIGN by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 105 placentae: 45 from pregnant women with HIV (WHIV) on protease inhibitor (PI)-based ART, 17 from WHIV on non-PI-based ART, and 43 from HIV-uninfected women. RESULTS: ACE2 levels were lower, while L-SIGN levels were higher, in placentae from WHIV on PI-based ART compared to those on non-PI-based ART and to HIV-uninfected women. TMPRSS2 levels were similar between groups. Black race was significantly associated with lower expression of ACE2 and higher expression of L-SIGN. ACE2 levels were significantly higher in placentae of female fetuses. CONCLUSIONS: We identified pregnant women of black race and WHIV on PI-based ART to have relatively lower expression of placental ACE2 than those of white race and HIV-uninfected women. This may potentially contribute to altered susceptibility to COVID-19 in these women, favorably by reduced viral entry or detrimentally by loss of ACE2 protection against hyperinflammation.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , HIV Infections/blood , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Placenta/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active , COVID-19/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies , Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics , Female , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/genetics , Pregnancy , RNA, Messenger , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics
19.
Cornea ; 39(12): 1556-1562, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109355

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To confirm the ocular tropism of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by evaluating the expression of viral entry factors in human ocular tissues using immunohistochemistry. METHODS: Fresh donor corneas and primary explant cultures of corneal, limbal, and conjunctival epithelial cells were evaluated for the expression of viral entry factors. Using immunohistochemistry, the samples were tested for the expression of angiotension-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), DC-SIGN-related protein (DC-SIGNR), and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2). RESULTS: In total, 5 donor corneas were evaluated for the expression of viral entry factors. In all specimens, both ACE2 and TMPRSS2 were expressed throughout the surface epithelium (corneal, limbal, and conjunctival) and corneal endothelium. In corneal stromal cells, ACE2 was sporadically expressed, whereas TMPRSS2 was absent. DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR expression varied between donor specimens. Four specimens expressed DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR in a similar distribution to ACE2, but 1 specimen from a young donor showed no expression of DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR. ACE2, TMPRSS2, and DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR were all expressed in the cultured corneal, limbal, and conjunctival epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: Both corneal and conjunctival epithelia express ACE2, DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR, and TMPRSS2, suggesting that the ocular surface is a potential route for the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. The risk of viral transmission with corneal transplantation cannot be ruled out, given the presence of ACE2 in corneal epithelium and endothelium. Cultured corneal, limbal, and conjunctival epithelial cells mimic the expression of viral entry factors in fresh donor tissue and may be useful for future in vitro SARS-CoV-2 infection studies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Conjunctiva/metabolism , Epithelium, Corneal/metabolism , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Cells, Cultured , Conjunctiva/cytology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Female , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect , Humans , Limbus Corneae/cytology , Male , Microscopy, Fluorescence , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Donors , Viral Tropism/physiology , Virus Internalization , Young Adult
20.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(3)2021 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067752

ABSTRACT

The occurrence of the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVD-19), represents a catastrophic threat to global health. Protruding from the viral surface is a densely glycosylated spike (S) protein, which engages angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to mediate host cell entry. However, studies have reported viral susceptibility in intra- and extrapulmonary immune and non-immune cells lacking ACE2, suggesting that the S protein may exploit additional receptors for infection. Studies have demonstrated interactions between S protein and innate immune system, including C-lectin type receptors (CLR), toll-like receptors (TLR) and neuropilin-1 (NRP1), and the non-immune receptor glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78). Recognition of carbohydrate moieties clustered on the surface of the S protein may drive receptor-dependent internalization, accentuate severe immunopathological inflammation, and allow for systemic spread of infection, independent of ACE2. Furthermore, targeting TLRs, CLRs, and other receptors (Ezrin and dipeptidyl peptidase-4) that do not directly engage SARS-CoV-2 S protein, but may contribute to augmented anti-viral immunity and viral clearance, may represent therapeutic targets against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Disease Progression , Heat-Shock Proteins/immunology , Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/immunology , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/immunology , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism
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