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1.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 41(3): 248-258, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1991817

ABSTRACT

Health sciences librarians may find it difficult to meet demands for in-person or online synchronous library orientations for various reasons, including short-staffing of librarians, expansion of online programs, and temporary campus closures caused by emergencies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors discuss the development, implementation, and assessment of an asynchronous online orientation tutorial created for use across various health sciences degree, certificate, and training programs. The tutorial can either replace or supplement synchronous orientations, and the original tutorial can be copied and customized for specific programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Librarians , Libraries, Medical , Humans , Pandemics
2.
Health Info Libr J ; 39(4): 336-346, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1927588

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, Health Education England (HEE) mobilised a group of expert searchers from NHS libraries in England to develop a platform for librarians to share peer reviewed search strategies and results on the Knowledge for Healthcare website. OBJECTIVES: (1) To document the origins of the COVID-19 search bank, (2) evaluate attitudes of NHS librarians in England towards the search bank and (3) identify lessons learned and consider whether the initiative might be developed further. METHODS: Structured interviews with the peer reviewers (n = 10) were conducted, and a questionnaire survey of the NHS library community using the search bank was undertaken. RESULTS: The interviews confirmed the value of collaboration. Expert searchers worked in pairs to peer review submitted search strategies. The survey (85 responses) indicated that a majority had used the search bank, and approved of the project, with some differences of opinion on functionality and future developments. DISCUSSION: Collaborative working for the search bank probably saved time for individual NHS librarians. The quality of the searches submitted was variable as were librarians' approaches to presentation and development of search strategies. Peer review benefits from a buddy approach among expert searchers and agreement about feedback provided to contributors. CONCLUSION: Search strategies are the most useful element of a search bank. Peer review can be challenging and would benefit from a formal structure, but it is professionally rewarding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Librarians , Libraries, Medical , Humans , State Medicine , Pandemics , Peer Review
3.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 110(1): 56-62, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835457

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the scope and adaptive nature of reference services provided by academic health sciences librarians over a one-year period (between March 2020 and March 2021) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In March 2021, academic health sciences librarians in the United States were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey about their experiences providing reference services during the COVID-19 pandemic. The online survey was developed, pretested, and distributed to various listservs. RESULTS: A total of 205 academic health sciences librarians and other information professionals with health sciences liaison responsibilities in the US (N=205) responded to the online survey. The scope of reference services provided during the COVID-19 pandemic included email-based reference services (97%), virtual reference (89%), telephone (80%), text-based (33%), and in-person (31%). The most common types of COVID-related reference questions included COVID-19 treatments (53%), safety precautions (46%), vaccines (41%), and prevalence (38%). Additionally, the identification of challenging reference questions and examples of misinformation were provided by respondents. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the survey characterize the evolving nature and scope of academic health sciences reference work during the COVID-19 pandemic. Librarians reported an increase in reference questions during the pandemic and are answering them in creative ways despite barriers (e.g., limited time and reduction in resources). There is an opportunity for librarians to continue to address COVID-related misinformation. Overall, these findings provide useful insight for library practitioners and administrators planning reference services during public health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Librarians , Libraries, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
4.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 41(2): 204-212, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1830460

ABSTRACT

Cyberattacks on healthcare organizations increased dramatically in 2020 and 2021. The University of Vermont Medical Center suffered an attack in October 2020, during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The disruption to hospital computer systems had wide-ranging impacts, including loss of online access to the medical library for nearly three months. Library staff worked to reduce impacts and increase access for hospital employees until full access was restored. This case study offers lessons learned and resources for health sciences libraries planning for a potential cyberattack.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Libraries, Medical , Library Services , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics
5.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 41(2): 213-221, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1830459

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 lockdown led to immediate changes in how Virginia Commonwealth University's (VCU) Health Sciences Library (HSL) would support faculty and students through the means of online learning objects (OLOs). Each Research and Education (RED) librarian is responsible for responding to the educational needs of a specific health sciences school or college as well as those of the VCU Health System. A rapid increase in the OLO creation required a mechanism to curate these objects, make them available to all liaisons, and standardize workflows. The act of curating and creating standardized workflows would allow for easier management and updating of content, the ability to share and cross-pollinate content between liaisons, and the prevention of duplicated content by liaisons, thus lessening the workload. Support from key stakeholders, including RED administrators, the Online Learning Librarian (OLL), and the Multimedia Teaching and Learning Librarian (MTLL), enabled a team of RED librarians (who formed an Online Learning Team (OLT)) to standardize workflows and upload them to the department's intranet for future reference.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Librarians , Libraries, Medical , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Workflow
6.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 110(2): 212-221, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1811078

ABSTRACT

Background: Public libraries serve as community centers for accessing free, trustworthy health information. As such, they provide an ideal setting to teach the local community about health and health literacy, particularly during public health crises like the COVID-19 pandemic. Since 2018, an outreach partnership between an academic medical library and public library has developed, delivered, and continuously evaluated a health education program targeting public library users. Case Presentation: Health education activities were integrated into three existing public library programs: adult workshops, child and family programming, and circulating family activity kits. Prior to COVID-19, events were held at the public library, which then pivoted online during the pandemic. An interprofessional team approach combined the expertise of academic medical and public librarians, medical school faculty and staff, and medical students in developing the educational programs. Twelve in-person and five virtual programs were offered, and five circulating health education family kits were launched. Activities were assessed using program evaluation surveys of the adult and children's programs and circulation statistics of the kits. Conclusions: This case report showcases the lessons learned from implementing a longitudinal outreach partnership between an academic medical library and public library before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The interprofessional team approach and flexibility in program design and delivery in both the in-person and virtual environments proved critical to the success of the partnership. This partnership could serve as a model for other libraries interested in pursuing interprofessional collaborations in educating local communities on healthy behavior and health information-seeking practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Librarians , Libraries, Medical , Adult , Child , Health Education , Humans , Pandemics
7.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 41(1): 41-53, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713333

ABSTRACT

This article focuses on providing virtual reference services at the MCPHS University Libraries as a response to the physical space closing due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The study emphasizes the importance of interdepartmental collaboration between all library staff members, and highlights important enhancements implemented to successfully meet the growing demand for live chat services and research consultations. Enhancements include expanding online chat hours, offering individualized virtual reference sessions, and integrating Zoom functionality into LibAnswers platform. Extensive data findings allowed for critical decision-making about eliminating the reference desk on one of the campuses, training student workers, and scheduling library staff for virtual services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Libraries, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(4): 690-692, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538720

ABSTRACT

The electronic information and technology accessibility project is a strategic overhauling of the digital instructional materials of the Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) to comply with the accessibility standards established in a 2020 University of Pittsburgh policy. Though these technologies have existed for quite some time, library instructors were not skilled in the actual creation and design of documents, web content, and presentations with accessibility in mind. Over the past year and a half, a team within HSLS developed detailed guidance and education on universal design and creating an inclusive online learning environment. These guidelines were developed in accordance with Section 508 and the WCAG2.1, with a focus on an improved experience for the D/deaf community and those with visual impairments. We initially made accessibility improvements to online subject guides, in-person presentations, and digitally shared class materials. The COVID-19 pandemic and complete shift to virtual instruction then necessitated the evaluation of platforms used in remote learning (such as Zoom and Panopto), where accessibility best practices needed to be incorporated. This article highlights going beyond in-program accessibility checkers and describes how library technology experts and content creators worked together to bridge the gap of accessibility in the information we share.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Libraries, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(4): 677-679, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538716

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2017, an academic health sciences library in Utah developed a multimedia studio for students, faculty, and academic staff. Educational projects needing video, audio, and lecture capture could utilize a one-button studio for recording video sessions, microphones for audio, and various screen capture software for lectures. Since the pandemic, this service has seen rapid growth due to academic lectures going exclusively online. In response, the library launched a dedicated podcasting suite to accommodate the increase in students and faculty needing to record lectures or podcasts for others in the medical profession. DESCRIPTION: This article will outline the process of creating the podcasting suite and provide equipment rosters and methods other libraries may consider for establishing their own studio. Administrating duties of the studio will also be included, such as handling reservations and user assessment. An instructional guide for users is also included to assist patrons in accomplishing their podcast creations. CONCLUSION: Podcasts created in the space range from topics about teaching strategies in medicine to diagnoses and treatments of skin disorders. A podcasting suite is another way libraries can provide valuable services for asynchronous learning and student projects. Students, staff, and faculty have appreciated the ease of the service and the support behind it. A feedback loop was developed to further improve the space to meet the needs of users.


Subject(s)
Libraries, Medical , Medicine , Humans , Learning , Students , Utah
10.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(4): 693-696, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538714

ABSTRACT

Increasing diverse author representation within medical librarianship scholarship among BIPOC information professionals is an important endeavor that requires closer examination. This commentary looks to examine the ways in which the profession can support Latinx librarians and library workers in fully participating within the scholarly pipeline by exploring our unique and authentic voices, structural barriers, hesitation and fears, Whiteness in the profession and knowledge production, bias in the peer review process, lack of resources and support, and finally, a call to action.


Subject(s)
Librarians , Libraries, Medical , Library Science , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans
11.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(3): 497-502, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior to 2020, library orientation for first-year medical students at Weill Cornell Medicine took the form of an on-site treasure hunt competition. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the orientation for the MD class of 2024 was shifted to an all-virtual format. This shift mandated a full redesign of the library orientation. CASE PRESENTATION: The Samuel J. Wood Library sought to preserve the excitement and fun of the treasure hunt in the new virtual format. The competition was redesigned as a Zoom meeting using breakout rooms, with library faculty and staff serving as team facilitators. Tasks were rewritten, shifting the focus from the library's physical spaces to its virtual services and online resources. The redesigned orientation was evaluated using two data sources: a postsession survey of student participants and a debriefing of the library employees who participated. Student evaluations were positive, while the faculty and staff provided numerous suggestions for improving future virtual orientations. CONCLUSIONS: A successful virtual library orientation requires careful preparation, including testing the competition tasks, full rehearsal with library facilitators, and a thoughtful approach to technology and logistics. We have chosen to share the materials we developed for other academic health sciences libraries that may wish to take a similar approach to their own virtual orientations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Libraries, Digital/organization & administration , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Organizational Case Studies , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , New York , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , Young Adult
12.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(2): 167-173, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355139

ABSTRACT

The Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA) recently issued a call for submissions that recognize and address social injustices; speak to diversity, equity, and inclusion in our workforce and among our user populations; and share critical perspectives on health sciences librarianship as well as those on any topic within JMLA's scope written by authors who are Black, Indigenous, or People of Color. We also committed to creating more equitable opportunities for authors, reviewers, and editorial board members from marginalized groups. As part of this effort, we conducted a demographic survey of all individuals who served as a member of the JMLA editorial board or reviewer or had submitted a manuscript to JMLA between 2018 and 2020. We found that most survey respondents are white, heterosexual, women and do not identify with a disability, meaning that JMLA is missing out on a diversity of perspectives and life experiences that could improve the journal's processes and policies, enrich its content, and accelerate the research and practice of health sciences librarianship. Therefore, to avoid perpetuating or aggravating systemic biases and power structures in scholarly publishing or health sciences librarianship, we pledge to take concrete steps toward making JMLA a more diverse and inclusive journal.


Subject(s)
Libraries, Medical , Library Science , Humans , Library Associations
13.
Health Info Libr J ; 37(4): 337-342, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255402

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed significant challenges for health science librarians. During this pandemic, librarians are playing an active role by increasing the public's awareness of the virus, maintaining document delivery services and providing research support. This paper uses the method of desktop analysis of the websites of selected library associations to identify the responses of health science librarians to the COVID-19 pandemic. The study highlights significant initiatives taken by some health science librarians which can be replicated by others to meet the needs of library users in the COVID-19 health crisis.J.M.


Subject(s)
Awareness , COVID-19 , Information Dissemination , Librarians/statistics & numerical data , Libraries, Medical , Professional Competence , Global Health , Health Resources , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(2): 188-204, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221291

ABSTRACT

The UCLA Science Libraries improved upon our single service points by creating a team-based, tiered research assistance model to foster student employee skill development. This model was further developed to expand training for public services staff, enabling librarians and student research assistants to move beyond desk-based services. This multi-phased approach involved restructured training and the development of collaborative, tiered services. Librarians utilized train-the-trainer sessions, detailed documentation toolkits, and a robust outreach plan to ensure success. After initial implementation of this new model, librarians observed above average use of the service and excellent user feedback. Its versatility has also played a direct role in the successful transition from physical to virtual services in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Library Science/education , Models, Organizational , Humans , Inservice Training , Los Angeles/epidemiology , Organizational Case Studies , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Program Development , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(2): 151-167, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221290

ABSTRACT

Between 2018 and 2019, the librarians at the Strauss Health Sciences Library improved the efficiency and reach of their reference service by implementing four small-scale changes. These changes included revising the method of collecting statistics, creating FAQs, utilizing an appointment scheduler, and launching proactive chat. This case study will provide the background and research to support these changes, details on how the changes were implemented using Springshare tools, as well as the results and implications. Finally, the librarians will share their lessons learned along with recommendations for institutions interested in adopting similar changes.


Subject(s)
Information Dissemination/methods , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Colorado , Humans , Organizational Case Studies
16.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 68(5): e28962, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100936

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic quickly led to an abundance of publications and recommendations, despite a paucity of information on how COVID-19 affects children with cancer. This created a dire need for a trusted resource with curated information and a space for the pediatric oncology community to share experiences. The Global COVID-19 Observatory and Resource Center for Childhood Cancer was developed, launched, and maintained by the International Society of Pediatric Oncology and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The three components (Resource Library, Global Registry, and Collaboration Space) complement each other, establishing a mechanism to generate and transfer knowledge rapidly throughout the community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Information Dissemination/methods , Libraries, Medical , Neoplasms/pathology , Child , Comorbidity , Health Resources , Humans , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(1): 122-129, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099408

ABSTRACT

Telehealth services have slowly yet steadily increased over the past few decades as new technologies emerge. However, social distancing mandates, state shutdowns, and an overburdened healthcare system during the COVID-19 pandemic forced a dramatic surge forward in telehealth use and policy. While many of these emergency measures are temporary, the successes, failures and lessons learned during this period will change the way telehealth is administered, moving forward. This column will review recent changes to telehealth and telemedicine services during the pandemic and their impact on healthcare systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Information Dissemination/methods , Librarians/education , Libraries, Digital/organization & administration , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adult , Female , Humans , Libraries, Digital/statistics & numerical data , Libraries, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
18.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(1): 90-102, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099406

ABSTRACT

The Librarian Reserve Corps (LRC) is a volunteer network of medical, health sciences, and public health librarians who have responded to the urgent need for public health information during the early days of the COVID-19 crisis. The LRC was first formed to assist with the indexing of daily publication lists distributed within the World Health Organization's Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN). With the explosion of information related to COVID-19 beginning in December 2019, librarians have brought critical skills and experience to the response, providing comprehensive literature searching and indexing to COVID-19 research publications. The evolution of this effort follows the trajectory of scientific publication trends and developments related to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Abstracting and Indexing , COVID-19 , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Librarians/psychology , Libraries, Digital/organization & administration , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , United States Public Health Service/organization & administration , Volunteers/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Libraries, Digital/statistics & numerical data , Libraries, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
19.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(1): 79-89, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099405

ABSTRACT

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Mountain Area Health Education Center formed a response team with the goal of building capacity across Western North Carolina health systems to collectively identify needs, coordinate resources to fill gaps, and strategically manage the regional threats of the pandemic. The library team collaborated on interprofessional projects by gathering information and using LibGuides to quickly and easily organize and share resources. The team met challenges, including moving to telecommuting, balancing a growing workload, and navigating a changing information landscape, and in doing so, strengthened relationships across the organization and the region.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Information Dissemination/methods , Intersectoral Collaboration , Librarians/psychology , Libraries, Digital/organization & administration , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Teleworking , Adult , Female , Humans , Libraries, Digital/statistics & numerical data , Libraries, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , North Carolina , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(1): 67-78, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099404

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected libraries across the globe, including academic health sciences libraries, in many ways. This manuscript describes the challenges, solutions, and practices employed by the Stony Brook University Health Sciences Library in order to maintain continuity of services to patrons including faculty, hospital staff, students, and clinicians while operating in one of the earliest epicenters of the pandemic. Some of the major changes the library underwent in response to the pandemic included implementing new online anatomy resources, contactless circulation, remote interlibrary loan services and modified operating practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Information Dissemination/methods , Libraries, Digital/organization & administration , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Pandemics , Humans , Libraries, Digital/statistics & numerical data , Libraries, Medical/statistics & numerical data , New York , SARS-CoV-2
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