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1.
Pediatrics ; 149(Suppl 5)2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833766

Subject(s)
Life Change Events , Humans
2.
R I Med J (2013) ; 105(4): 63-67, 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1812837

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented new challenges for physicians, and physician-parents specifically. Few studies have focused on work-life changes in this population. The present study investigated work-life changes in a group of physicians during the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A survey was distributed electronically to physicians affiliated with a U.S. medical school inquiring about experiences during the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020 to September 2020). RESULTS: In logistic regression models adjusted for age, significantly more female physician- parents reported increased burnout, increased time with kids, and increased fear of going to work compared to male physician-parents. Around 1 in 2 attendings reported burnout, regardless of parenting status. CONCLUSION: While high rates of burnout were found across all groups in this study, differences were found by gender and parenting status. Further research is needed to understand burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic and to support physician-parents.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Life Change Events , Male , Pandemics , Parenting
3.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 30(6): 1268-1278, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to measure the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on self-reported life experiences in older adults with diabetes and obesity. METHODS: Participants were surveyed in 2020 regarding negative and positive impacts of the pandemic across domains of personal, social, and physical experiences. A cumulative negative risk index (a count of all reported negative impacts of 46 items) and a positive risk index (5 items) were characterized in relation to age, sex, race/ethnicity, BMI, and multimorbidity. RESULTS: Response rate was high (2950/3193, 92%), average age was 76 years, 63% were women, and 39% were from underrepresented populations. Women reported more negative impacts than men (6.8 vs. 5.6; p < 0.001 [of 46 items]) as did persons with a greater multimorbidity index (p < 0.001). Participants reporting African American/Black race reported fewer negative impacts than White participants. Women also reported more positive impacts than men (1.9 vs. 1.6; p < 0.001 [of 5 items]). CONCLUSIONS: Older adults with diabetes and obesity reported more positive impacts of the pandemic than negative impacts, relative to the number of positive (or negative) items presented. Some subgroups experienced greater negative impacts (e.g., for women, a greater multimorbidity index). Efforts to reestablish personal, social, and physical health after the pandemic could target certain groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Life Change Events , Male , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics
4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 801176, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701305

ABSTRACT

Rather than concentrating primarily on children and adolescents, there has been a shift in the discourse around immunisation to encompass a whole-of-life approach. Despite this acknowledgement and ongoing high burdens of vaccine preventable diseases in adults, coverage for some adult risk groups remains sub-optimal. This study aimed to explore key informant's and stakeholder's perceptions of factors impacting provision of immunisation programs for Australian adults and to identify strategies to promote acceptance and uptake. Semi-structured telephone interviews were undertaken with people involved in adult immunisation program delivery, advocacy, policy or research between September 2020 and June 2021. Transcripts were inductively analysed, with the resulting themes categorised into the five influences on vaccination gaps that have informed program planning in other countries: Access, Affordability, Awareness, Acceptance and Activation. Participants spoke of improvements in the provision of vaccines to adults, however, ongoing challenges persisted. Participants agreed that the focus or emphasis of policies and the promotion/communication strategies has been on childhood vaccination in Australia, however there is a sense that the "pendulum has swung." These included understanding of eligibility amongst the Australian population and the reluctance of some health providers to dedicate time to exploring immunisation needs with adult patients. In comparison to the childhood vaccination program, there has been a lack of data available on coverage for adult vaccines on the national immunisation program. This has contributed to the ongoing challenges of identifying and promoting certain vaccines. At a government level, questions were raised about why the Australian government has never set an aspirational target for adult vaccination (i.e., influenza or pneumococcal) coverage. While significant improvements have been made in adult immunisation uptake, there are still gaps across the program. While the system remains under stress because of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is not appropriate to implement any additional programs. There needs to be strong commitment to establish the value of adult vaccination in the eyes of community members, policy makers and healthcare professionals. Having a national adult immunisation strategic plan would help advance action.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Adolescent , Adult , Australia/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Immunization , Life Change Events , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
5.
Lancet ; 398(10317): 2145, 2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637341
6.
Lancet ; 398(10317): 2145-2146, 2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635670
7.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e056655, 2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603934

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: While all research-oriented faculty face the pressures of academia, female faculty in fields including science, engineering, medicine and nursing, are especially susceptible to burnout. Nursing is unique in that it remains a predominantly female-dominated profession, which implies that there is a critical mass of females who are disproportionately affected and/or at higher risk of burnout. To date, little is known about the experiences of nursing faculty especially, new and early career researchers and the factors that influence their retention. This study aims to understand the work-life (the intersection of work with personal life) experiences of nursing faculty in Canadian academic settings and the factors that influence their retention. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A mixed-method design will be used in this study. For the quantitative study, a sample of approximately 1500 new and early career nursing faculty across Canadian academic institutions will be surveyed. Eligible participants will be invited to complete a web-based structured questionnaire in both French and English language. Data will be evaluated using generalised linear regression model and structural equation modelling. Given the complexities of work-life issues in Canada, qualitative focus group interviews with about 20-25 participants will also be conducted. Emerging themes will be integrated with the survey findings and used to enrich the interpretation of the quantitative data. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has received ethical approval from the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board (#1477). Prior to obtaining informed consent, participants will be provided with information about study risks and benefits and strategies undertaken to ensure confidentiality and anonymity. The study findings will be disseminated to academics and non-academic stakeholders through national and international conference presentations and peer-reviewed open-access journals. A user-friendly report will be shared with professional nursing associations such as the Canadian Associations of Schools of Nursing, and through public electronic forums (e.g., Twitter). Evidence from this study will also be shared with stakeholders including senior academic leaders and health practitioners, government, and health service policy-makers, to raise the profile of discourses on the nursing workforce shortages; and women's work-life balance, a public policy issue often overlooked at the national level. Such discussion is especially pertinent in light of the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on women, and female academics. The findings will be used to inform policy options for improving nursing faculty retention in Canada and globally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Faculty, Nursing , Canada , Female , Health Services , Humans , Life Change Events , SARS-CoV-2
8.
9.
Am J Epidemiol ; 190(11): 2262-2274, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517822

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of mental health problems represents a significant burden on school and community health resources as early as preschool. Reducing this burden requires a better understanding of the developmental mechanisms linking children's early vulnerabilities with mental health after the transition to formal schooling. The 3D-Transition Study (2017-2021) follows 939 participants from a pregnancy cohort in the province of Québec, Canada, as they transition to kindergarten and first grade to examine these mechanisms. Biannual assessments include completed questionnaires from 2 parents as well as teachers, parent-child observations, anthropometric measurements, and age-sensitive cognitive assessments. Saliva is also collected on 11 days over a 16-month period in a subsample of 384 participants to examine possible changes in child salivary cortisol levels across the school transition and their role in difficulties observed during the transition. A combination of planned missing-data designs is being implemented to reduce participant burden, where incomplete data are collected without introducing bias after the use of multiple imputation. The 3D-Transition Study will contribute to an evidence-based developmental framework of child mental health from pregnancy to school age. In turn, this framework can help inform prevention programs delivered in health-care settings during pregnancy and in child-care centers, preschools, and schools.


Subject(s)
Epidemiologic Research Design , Mental Health , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects , Schools , Stress, Psychological , Adverse Childhood Experiences , Child Development , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Hydrocortisone/metabolism , Infant , Life Change Events , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pregnancy
10.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258133, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463310

ABSTRACT

The conducted qualitative research was aimed at capturing the biggest challenges related to the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The interviews were carried out in March-June (five stages of the research) and in October (the 6th stage of the research). A total of 115 in-depth individual interviews were conducted online with 20 respondents, in 6 stages. The results of the analysis showed that for all respondents the greatest challenges and the source of the greatest suffering were: a) limitation of direct contact with people; b) restrictions on movement and travel; c) necessary changes in active lifestyle; d) boredom and monotony; and e) uncertainty about the future.


Subject(s)
Boredom , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Life Change Events , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology , Travel/psychology , Uncertainty , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , Qualitative Research
11.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(10): 727-733, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440682

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of anxiety, depression, and irritability symptoms in children during the COVID-19 outbreak and to investigate the associated factors of these symptoms. This study was conducted with 1071 children aged 6 to 17. Results showed that 49.9% of the participants had anxiety symptoms, 29.5% had depression symptoms, and 51.4% had irritability symptoms. Low age was a potential risk factor for anxiety symptoms. Female sex was a potential risk factor for anxiety and depression symptoms. A COVID-19 death in the family or environment was a potential risk factor for depression and irritability symptoms. Exposure to COVID-19 information on television and on the internet was a potential risk factor for anxiety, depression, and irritability symptoms. In conclusion, this study revealed that the COVID-19 outbreak may have serious effects on the mental health of children, and the study highlighted potential risk factors.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Irritable Mood , Adolescent , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Internet , Life Change Events , Male , Mass Media , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430873

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to examine the first-year students' experience in college during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide a better understanding of their daily life. Using inductive content analysis, this study examined the characteristics and experiences of students who started college during the COVID-19 period in South Korea. We analyzed 623 pieces of content, using data presented by a total of 81 study subjects. From this analysis, we derived 22 primary keywords, which we divided into eight categories, and then reclassified into three general topics: self-awareness (i.e., self-reflection), activities (i.e., engagement in activities), and resources (i.e., creating relationships or producing results). The results showed that, although first-year college students experienced difficulties in adapting to the COVID-19 situation, they tried to cope with them. Our findings shed light on the experiences of college students who experienced psychological problems during the COVID-19 pandemic and overcame related challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Life Change Events , Pandemics , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
13.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(10): 929-936, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415873

ABSTRACT

Informal (unpaid) carers are an integral part of all societies and the health and social care systems in the UK depend on them. Despite the valuable contributions and key worker status of informal carers, their lived experiences, wellbeing, and needs have been neglected during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this Health Policy, we bring together a broad range of clinicians, researchers, and people with lived experience as informal carers to share their thoughts on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on UK carers, many of whom have felt abandoned as services closed. We focus on the carers of children and young people and adults and older adults with mental health diagnoses, and carers of people with intellectual disability or neurodevelopmental conditions across different care settings over the lifespan. We provide policy recommendations with the aim of improving outcomes for all carers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Health Policy/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Services Needs and Demand/legislation & jurisprudence , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Caregivers/economics , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Intellectual Disability/psychology , Life Change Events , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Morbidity/trends , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Social Support , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
16.
Interface (Botucatu, Online) ; 25(supl.1): e200671, 2021.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1280686

ABSTRACT

O presente trabalho constitui uma narrativa das experiências do autor, médico psiquiatra e pesquisador em Saúde Coletiva, referente ao tempo de sua enfermidade de Covid-19, como expressa na própria memória, por meio de recordação, fluxo de consciência, registro de elementos factuais e reflexão crítica. O tempo na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI) foi esquecido e passou a ser lembrado segundo a lógica da fabulação, alucinatório-delirante. Os fatos temporais e clínicos são os que constam nos prontuários da UTI, da Enfermaria e da Equipe Domiciliar, de posse do autor. Espera-se oferecer à sociedade uma vivência singular de como a Covid-19 nos obriga a pensar o indivíduo, a coletividade e as políticas de saúde, por ocasião da primeira grande pandemia viral do mundo globalizado, que ainda não chegou ao seu termo. (AU)


This work presents a narrative of the author's experiences as a psychiatrist and public health researcher of his Covid-19 illness, as expressed in memory, through recall, stream of consciousness, recording of factual elements and critical reflection. The time in intensive care was forgotten and came to be remembered according to the logic of hallucinatory-delusional fabulation. The temporal and clinical facts are based on the intensive care unit, ward and homecare team's medical records in the author's possession. The author seeks to offer a singular experience of how Covid-19 makes us think about the individual, the collective and health policy in connection with the first great viral pandemic in the globalized world, which has not yet reached its end. (AU)


Este trabajo constituye una narrativa de las experiencias del autor, médico psiquiatra e investigador de salud colectiva, referente al tiempo de su enfermedad de Covid-19, como expresa en la propia memoria, por medio de recursos, flujo de conciencia, registro de elementos factuales y reflexión crítica. El tiempo en la UCI fue olvidado y pasó a recordarse según la lógica de la fabulación, alucinatoria-delirante. Los hechos temporales y clínicos son los que constan en las fichas de la UCI, de la enfermería y del equipo domiciliario, en poder del autor. Se espera ofrecer a la sociedad una vivencia singular de cómo la Covid-19 nos obliga a pensar el individuo, la colectividad y las políticas de salud, por ocasión de la 1ª gran pandemia viral del mundo globalizado, que todavía no ha llegado a su fin. (AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Medical Records , Mental Health , COVID-19/psychology , Life Change Events
18.
Disabil Health J ; 14(4): 101120, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240277

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on adults with intellectual disabilities who are dependent on community services. OBJECTIVE: This study explored the experiences of adults with intellectual disabilities from their perspective during the COVID-19 pandemic in South Korea, where most community-based services were suspended. METHODS: We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 adults with intellectual disabilities who lost access to services during COVID-19 pandemic. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted. RESULTS: Five overarching themes emerged: changes in (a) daily life, (b) health behaviors, (c) family relationships, (d) social relationships, and (e) social participation. Most participants experienced the loss of daily routines and healthy behaviors, family conflicts, and social isolation, but they also developed new ways of adapting and finding a new normal. CONCLUSIONS: The findings offer valuable evidence of ways to develop and stabilize community-based services during a pandemic, with insights into the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Intellectual Disability , Adult , Humans , Life Change Events , Pandemics , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2
19.
BMC Psychol ; 9(1): 83, 2021 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is a crisis unprecedented in its size and scope. Yet studies of resilience suggest most individuals will successfully negotiate this challenge and some may even experience growth and positive change. Some evidence suggests that the capacity to enact positive change in the face of adversity may be shaped by early life experiences. METHODS: In a subset of 374 participants (57% female, mean age = 29 years) in the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD), a longitudinal, birth cohort, prospective models were tested to determine whether early life adversities in family and neighborhood contexts predict positive change events in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Childhood family and neighborhood contexts were assessed using a combination of self-report questionnaires and US Census data. Adulthood positive change events (e.g., becoming more appreciative of things usually taken for granted) were assessed using the Epidemic-Pandemic Impacts Inventory (EPII). RESULTS: In regression analyses, neighborhood disadvantage in childhood, measured both by objective and subjective assessments, predicted a higher number of positive change events in response to the COVID-19 pandemic (ß = .18, p = .004 and ß = .15, p = .006, respectively). Examination of the positive change event subscales showed neighborhood disadvantage in childhood predicted increases in events related to 'perspective taking and charitable giving' (ß = .20, p = .022 and ß = .17, p = .002, respectively) and improved 'social relationships' (ß = .18, p = .004 and ß = .13, p = .020, respectively), but not to positive 'health behaviors' (ps > .05). All associations were independent of sociodemographic factors and childhood family dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that neighborhood disadvantage in childhood may shape prosocial responses to stress in adulthood, potentially through early life adaptions to stress that are protective when facing adversity. There are several notable implications of the study findings. Although adversity in early life has clear negative impacts, it is possible that adversity experiences may also provide opportunities to develop adaptive strategies that foster resilience and growth when facing stress. Intervention efforts should consider leveraging such stress-adapted strengths to reduce the many negative impacts of early life adversity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Life Change Events , Male , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Can J Psychiatry ; 66(6): 577-585, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231204

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The co-occurrence of different classes of population-level stressors, such as social unrest and public health crises, is common in contemporary societies. Yet, few studies explored their combined mental health impact. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of repeated exposure to social unrest-related traumatic events (TEs), coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic-related events (PEs), and stressful life events (SLEs) on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms, and the potential mediating role of event-based rumination (rumination of TEs-related anger, injustice, guilt, and insecurity) between TEs and PTSD symptoms. METHODS: Community members in Hong Kong who had utilized a screening tool for PTSD and depressive symptoms were invited to complete a survey on exposure to stressful events and event-based rumination. RESULTS: A total of 10,110 individuals completed the survey. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that rumination, TEs, and SLEs were among the significant predictors for PTSD symptoms (all P < 0.001), accounting for 32% of the variance. For depression, rumination, SLEs, and PEs were among the significant predictors (all P < 0.001), explaining 24.9% of the variance. Two-way analysis of variance of different recent and prior TEs showed significant dose-effect relationships. The effect of recent TEs on PTSD symptoms was potentiated by prior TEs (P = 0.005). COVID-19 PEs and prior TEs additively contributed to PTSD symptoms, with no significant interaction (P = 0.94). Meanwhile, recent TEs were also potentiated by SLEs (P = 0.002). The effects of TEs on PTSD symptoms were mediated by rumination (ß = 0.38, standard error = 0.01, 95% confidence interval: 0.36 to 0.41), with 40.4% of the total effect explained. All 4 rumination subtypes were significant mediators. CONCLUSIONS: Prior and ongoing TEs, PEs, and SLEs cumulatively exacerbated PTSD and depressive symptoms. The role of event-based rumination and their interventions should be prioritized for future research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Rumination, Cognitive/classification , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Stress, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Life Change Events , Male , Mass Screening/methods , Mental Health , Psychological Techniques , Public Health , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sociological Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
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