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1.
Pediatr Obes ; 17(9): e12922, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2192645

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Investigations into the main drivers of childhood obesity are vital to implement effective interventions to halt the global rise in levels. The use of a composite score may help to identify children most at risk of overweight/obesity. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the cumulative impact of factors associated with overweight/obesity risk in children. METHODS: Data were analysed from the Irish National Children's Food Survey II which included 600 children, aged 5-12-years. The risk factors examined included social class, parental, early life, lifestyle, and dietary components. A composite score was calculated which ranged from 0 (no risk factors for overweight/obesity) to 4 (4 risk factors for overweight/obesity). RESULTS: In model 1 (%BF) the four factors associated with overweight/obesity risk were having a parent with overweight/obesity (odds ratio 3.1; 95% confidence interval 1.9-4.8), having a high birth weight of ≥4 kg (2.5; 1.6-3.9), being from a low social class (2.3; 1.4-3.8) and low physical activity (1.9; 1.2-2.8). Children who scored 3-4 points on the composite score had a 10-fold (10.0; 4.2-23.9) increased risk of overweight/obesity compared to those with 0 points, a sevenfold (7.2; 3.9-13.5) increased risk compared to those with 1 point and a threefold (2.6; 1.4-4.8) increased risk compared to those with 2 points, with similar results observed in model 2 (BMI). CONCLUSION: The use of a composite score is a beneficial means of identifying children at risk of overweight/obesity and may prove useful in the development of effective interventions to tackle childhood obesity.


Subject(s)
Overweight , Pediatric Obesity , Body Mass Index , Child , Diet , Exercise , Humans , Life Style , Overweight/epidemiology , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Pediatric Obesity/prevention & control
2.
JAMA Cardiol ; 7(2): 231-232, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2172192
3.
Rural Remote Health ; 22(4): 7231, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2164502

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused unprecedented social and economic disruption, accompanied by the enactment of a multitude of public health measures to restrain disease transmission. These public health and social measures have had a considerable impact on lifestyle and mental wellbeing, which has been well studied with metropolitan populations. However, limited literature concerning such effects on a selectively rural population is presently available. Additionally, the use of a standardised scoring system for lifestyle may be valuable for an overall assessment of lifestyle that may be incorporated into clinical practice. METHODS: This study examined the associations between psychological distress and changes in SNAPS health behaviours (smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity, sleep) since the onset of COVID-19 in Australia. A cross-sectional anonymous survey was distributed online to adults in the Western New South Wales Primary Health Network in August 2020 and included measures of psychological distress, income, disposition and lifestyle factors during the pandemic as well as changes to lifestyle due to COVID-19. A novel Global Lifestyle Score (GLS) was generated as a holistic assessment of lifestyle across multiple domains. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 304 individuals (modal age group 45-54 years, 86.8% female). High distress on the Kessler-5 scale was present in over one-third of participants (n=95, 33.7%). Detrimental change was reported for sleep (22.7%), nutrition (14.5%), alcohol (16.7%), physical exercise (34.0%) and smoking (24.7%) since the onset of the pandemic. Changes in sleep, nutrition, physical activity and smoking were associated with distress. Participants with a poor lifestyle (GLS) during the pandemic were significantly more distressed. Perceived COVID-19 impact was associated with high distress, drought impact and loss of income. Participants who reported negative impact from both COVID-19 and drought were significantly more distressed than those reporting a negative impact from drought alone or neither event. CONCLUSION: High rates of distress among rural Australians during the COVID-19 pandemic was linked to low GLS, worsening lifestyles and loss of income. Healthy lifestyle strategies should be considered by health professionals for the management of crisis-related distress. Further research may explore the impact of COVID-19 on a larger study population with a greater proportion of male participants and to examine the effect of modifying lifestyle factors in reducing distress in the context of a stressor such as this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Droughts , Female , Humans , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Pan Afr Med J ; 42: 210, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2145203

ABSTRACT

Introduction: mental health nurses (MHNs) work in potentially high-stress settings, in particular in low-income countries during the COVID-19 pandemic the risk might be high. This multi-centre, cross-sectional study explored the prevalence of psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among Ugandan MHNs and investigated associations between these mental health outcomes and lifestyle factors. Methods: in this cross-sectional study, participants completed the Kessler-6 (K-6), PTSD checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5), simple physical activity questionnaire (SIMPAQ), physical activity (PA) vital sign (PAVS), Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI, and alcohol use disorder identification test-concise (AUDIT-C). Spearman Rho correlations and Mann Whitney U tests were applied. Results: of 108 included MHNs (age =34.8±10.0 years; 55.6% female) 92.6% had psychological distress (K-6≥13), 44.4% elevated PTSD symptoms (PCL-%≥41), 74.1% was physically inactive (less than 150min/week on PAVS), 75.9% reported poor sleep quality (PSQI>-5) and 24.4% harmful drinking (AUDIT-C≥3 for women and -≥4 for men). SIMPAQ exercise correlated with K-6 (rho =-0.36, P<0.001) and PCL-5 (rho=-0.24, P=0.013), SIMPAQ walking with PCL-5 (rho =-0.31, P<0.001). Mental health nurses meeting the PA guidelines reported lower PCL-5 scores than those who did not (P<0.005). Conclusion: in Uganda, the mental health burden is high during the COVID-19 pandemic among MHNs and associated with an unhealthy lifestyle. The effectiveness and efficacy of resilience programs for MHNs focusing on unhealthy lifestyle patterns should be explored.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Male , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Mental Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Uganda/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Life Style
5.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2140, 2022 11 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139233

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After emerging in China, the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) quickly spread to all parts of the country and became a global public health emergency. The Chinese government immediately took a series of protective and quarantine measures to prevent the spread of the virus, and these measures may have negative effects on behavior and psychological health. This study aimed to examine the associations between factors related to COVID-19 measures and mental health symptoms among Chinese college students in different pandemic areas. METHODS: An online survey was administered to 14,789 college students from February 4 to 12, 2020. After excluding the participants who did not complete the questionnaire, the quality of the questionnaire was checked. Finally, the sample included 11,787 college students from 16 cities and 21 universities in China. The areas included the city of Wuhan (Area 1), the neighboring province of Hubei (Area 2), first-tier cities (Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou [Area 3]), and other provinces (Area 4). RESULTS: The average age of the participants was 20.51 ± 1.88 years. One-third of the participants were men. In total, 25.9 and 17.8% reported depression and anxiety, respectively. We also explored COVID-19-related factors, such as infection risk, perceived resistance to COVID-19 (or susceptibility to COVID-19 infection), perceived physical symptoms, family or friends, direct or indirect contact with confirmed cases, and having sought psychological counseling, which were significantly associated with anxiety and depression symptoms. Higher screen time, lower physical activity, higher soda and tea beverages (also called sugar sweetened beverages intake), use of alternative medicines or food supplements (including Chinese herbal medicines and vitamins), and decreased meal frequency were all correlated with higher depression and anxiety symptoms (depression: χ2 = 25.57 and anxiety: χ2 = 39.42). Coping with COVID-19 partially mediated the associations between some related lifestyle behaviors, anxiety, and depression. The conditional process model analysis results supported our hypotheses that lifestyle health behaviors and coping style were both predictors of anxiety and depression symptoms, and their direct and indirect effects were moderated by sex. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the city of Wuhan, other epidemic areas had a lower risk of mental health problems. Lifestyle health behaviors and coping styles alleviated mental health symptoms. COVID-19-related social stressors were positively associated with mental health symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Male , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , China/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Life Style , Internet
6.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2130, 2022 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139230

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health recommendations and governmental restrictions during the COVID-19 epidemic have affect everyday life. This study aimed to examine temporal changes in health-related lifestyle and the accumulation of positive and negative changes in the key lifestyle factors (vegetable consumption, leisure-time physical activity, sleeping, alcohol consumption, smoking) in the same individuals among Finnish adults during the epidemic. METHODS: This study was based on a series of cross-sectional surveys conducted between April 2020 and June 2021 to investigate antibody levels for the new coronavirus in the population. In each survey, a random sample of adults (18 to 69 years) from five university hospital regions were invited. A total of 5655 (response rate 32%) responded to the questionnaire including questions on lifestyle changes during epidemic. RESULTS: On average one-sixth of respondents (17%) reported at least two negative changes in the key lifestyle factors during the study period. An increase in snacking and sleep problems and decrease in leisure-time physical activity and active commuting to work were the most common of individual negative changes. The proportion of negative changes in physical activity increased as the epidemic drags on. In contrast, on average every seventh of the respondents (14%) reported at least two positive lifestyle changes in the key lifestyle factors. The most common individual positive changes were increased consumption of fruit, berries and vegetables and decreased consumption of alcohol. More negative changes were reported on average, when both negative and positive changes in the key lifestyle factors were summed. The most negative changes were reported in the late 2020. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study suggest that the lifestyle changes during the COVID-19 epidemic have been diverse being on average more commonly unfavorable than favorable for health. The deteriorated epidemic situation in the late 2020 and, on the other hand, prolonged epidemic predisposed to negative lifestyle changes. Further studies are important to examine whether these changes are maintained over time and to identify the factors that contribute to changes and their accumulation in the same individuals. Health promotion actions are needed to prevent the long-term effects of the epidemic on health and welfare.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Finland/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Healthy Lifestyle , Life Style , Vegetables
8.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(10): 764-770, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2138416

ABSTRACT

Long-term weight loss can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes for people living with obesity and reduce complications for patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether a telehealth lifestyle-coaching program (Liva) leads to long-term (24 months) weight loss compared to usual care. In a randomized controlled trial, n = 340 participants living with obesity with or without type 2 diabetes were enrolled and randomized via an automated computer algorithm to an intervention group (n = 200) or to a control group (n = 140). The telehealth lifestyle-coaching program comprised of an initial one-hour face-to-face motivational interview followed by asynchronous telehealth coaching. The behavioural change techniques used were enabled by individual live monitoring. The primary outcome was a change in body weight from baseline to 24 months. Data were assessed for n = 136 participants (40%), n = 81 from the intervention group and n = 55 from the control group, who completed the 24-month follow-up. After 24 months mean body weight and body mass index were reduced significantly for completers in both groups, but almost twice as much was registered for those in the intervention group which was not significant between groups -4.4 (CI -6.1; -2.8) kg versus -2.5 (CI -3.9; -1.1) kg, P = 0.101. Haemoglobin A1c was significantly reduced in the intervention group -3.1 (CI -5.0; -1.2) mmol/mol, but not in the control group -0.2 (CI -2.4; -2.0) mmol/mol without a significant between group difference (P = 0.223). Low completion was partly due to coronavirus disease 2019. Telehealth lifestyle coaching improve long-term weight loss (> 24 months) for obese people with and without type 2 diabetes compared to usual care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Mentoring , Telemedicine , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/prevention & control , Weight Loss , Telemedicine/methods , Life Style , Obesity/therapy , Primary Health Care
9.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(1): e25241, 2021 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141298

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in changes to normal life and disrupted social and economic function worldwide. However, little is known about the impact of social media use, unhealthy lifestyles, and the risk of miscarriage among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the association between social media use, unhealthy lifestyles, and the risk of miscarriage among pregnant women in the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, 456 singleton pregnant women in mainland China were recruited during January and February 2020. Sociodemographic characteristics, history of previous health, social media use, and current lifestyles were collected at baseline, and we followed up about the occurrence of miscarriage. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the risk ratios (RRs) of miscarriage for women with different exposures to COVID-19-specific information. RESULTS: Among all the 456 pregnant women, there were 82 (18.0%) who did no physical activities, 82 (18.0%) with inadequate dietary diversity, 174 (38.2%) with poor sleep quality, and 54 (11.8%) spending >3 hours on reading COVID-19 news per day. Women with excessive media use (>3 hours) were more likely to be previously pregnant (P=.03), have no physical activity (P=.003), have inadequate dietary diversity (P=.03), and have poor sleep quality (P<.001). The prevalence of miscarriage was 16.0% (n=73; 95% CI 12.6%-19.4%). Compared with women who spent 0.5-2 hours (25/247, 10.1%) on reading COVID-19 news per day, miscarriage prevalence in women who spent <0.5 hours (5/23, 21.7%), 2-3 hours (26/132, 19.7%), and >3 hours (17/54, 31.5%) was higher (P<.001). Miscarriage prevalence was also higher in pregnant women with poor sleep quality (39/174, 22.4% vs 34/282, 12.1%; P=.003) and a high education level (66/368, 17.9% vs 7/88, 8.0%; P=.02). In the multivariable model, poor sleep quality (adjusted RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.24-3.44; P=.006), 2-3 hours of media use daily (adjusted RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.02-2.97; P=.04), and >3 hours of media use daily (adjusted RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.43-4.59; P=.002) were associated with miscarriage. In the sensitivity analysis, results were still stable. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women with excessive media use were more likely to have no physical activity, inadequate dietary diversity, and poor sleep quality. Excessive media use and poor sleep quality were associated with a higher risk of miscarriage. Our findings highlight the importance of healthy lifestyles during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous/etiology , Life Style , Pregnant Women/psychology , Social Media/trends , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Abortion, Spontaneous/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Social Media/statistics & numerical data
11.
Front Public Health ; 10: 920694, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2121804

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted individuals to deviate from normal lifestyle behaviors. But, there is a paucity of studies conducted in Bangladesh assessing how lifestyle patterns (i.e., smoking, drug use, physical exercise) have changed after the pandemic, which was investigated in this study. Methods: An online-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among a total of 756 Bangladeshi young adults between April 1 and 13, 2020. Lifestyle patterns data were collected based on two periods from the COVID-19 pandemic inception point in the country, (i) '1 year before', and (ii) '1 year after'. Basic descriptive statistics (i.e., frequency and percentages) and Chi-square tests were performed to examine the associations of the independent variables in relation to lifestyle patterns. Results: A 0.2 and 4.7% reduction in smoking and physical exercise, respectively, was observed after the pandemic. But the prevalence of drug use was 1.5% before the COVID-19 pandemic, which rose to 1.9% during the pandemic; representing a 0.4% increment. The changes in lifestyle patterns before and during the COVID-19 pandemic was statistically significant only for physical exercise. Of the gender, male participants were more prevalent in smoking, drug use, and performing physical exercise in both periods. Conclusion: It is suggested to increase awareness concerning adverse effects of drug use and not performing physical exercise, where the gender-based focus is highly appreciated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Life Style , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
13.
Front Public Health ; 10: 886137, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119634

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to identify factors that affect lifestyle changes and focused on coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-related anxiety since the COVID-19 outbreak in South Korea. Data from 213,848 individuals from the 2020 Korean Community Health Survey were analyzed using a complex sampling design. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, one-way ANOVA, and multiple regression analyses were performed. Participants reported a high level of COVID-19-related anxiety, with a score of 19.28 out of 25. The score of healthy behavioral change index was -0.51, indicating negative changes in physical activity, dietary habits, and sleep patterns. A slight positive change was reported for addictive behavioral change index, such as smoking and alcohol consumption, at 0.27 scores, indicating a decrease in these behaviors. COVID-19-related anxiety was an important factor that negatively affected health behavior. The high-risk groups that were vulnerable to anxiety included older adults and those who have little social support or few social encounters. Thus, identifying high-risk groups with the potential for worsened health behavior and providing interventions to reduce the anxiety caused by COVID-19 are necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Life Style , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , Health Behavior
14.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 19640, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117426

ABSTRACT

We conducted an internet survey to assess sociodemographic variables, lifestyle factors, sleep problems, and comorbidities for sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) in COVID-19 and influenza (FLU) infections. Data from 10,323 workers (50.0% male) were analyzed. COVID-19 was diagnosed in 144 subjects (COVID-19+), and 8,693 were classified as not suspected to be infected (COVID-19-). SAS had been diagnosed in 35.4% of the COVID-19+ subjects, but only 231 (2.7%) of the 8,693 COVID-19- subjects. COVID-19+ subjects were more susceptible to FLU (35.4%) compared to COVID-19- subjects (3.0%). A multivariate analysis revealed that higher risks of COVID-19+ were linked to the following factors: going out without a face mask (OR 7.05, 95% CI 4.53-11.00), FLU+ (OR 6.33, 95% CI 3.80-10.54), excessive exercise before going to sleep (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.63-2.70), SAS+ (OR 5.08, 95% CI 2.88-8.94), younger age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.07), falling sleep while sitting or talking with someone (OR 3.70, 95% CI 2.30-5.95), and use of hypnotics (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.20-4.30). Since sleep impairment played a relatively small role in COVID-19+/SAS- subjects, we assume that SAS itself was a more significant risk factor for COVID-19 infection rather than sleep impairment. A better understanding of the mechanisms that result in increased susceptibility to COVID-19 in SAS is vital for helping prevent COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Life Style , Sleep , Female , Humans , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Internet , Japan/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Sleep Apnea Syndromes/epidemiology
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116224

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to evaluate the lifestyle changes of families with children aged 4-8 years during lockdown compared to the time before the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was conducted among 1098 parents during the first lockdown in Poland. An originally developed questionnaire was used as the research tool. The Wilcoxon test was used to determine the frequency of differences in the lifestyle of parents and children before the pandemic and during lockdown. Differences were found in the frequency of healthy habits in the periods under investigation, both in the lifestyle of parents and children. A moderately healthy lifestyle was predominant among families with children aged 4-8 years during lockdown. The families' lifestyle significantly changed in relation to the time before the pandemic. There is a need for lifestyle education for families with children to prevent the development of bad habits during and after the pandemic and isolation time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Poland/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Life Style
16.
Nutrients ; 14(22)2022 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116170

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers (HCWs) experienced significantly higher burdens and life demands due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study sought to assess the longitudinal effects among HCWs throughout the pandemic. Qualtrics surveys collected self-reported data on weight changes, eating patterns, physical activity (PA), and psychological factors with data organized by timepoints prior to the pandemic (PP0-prior to March 2020), baseline (M0-January 2021), month 6 (M6-July 2021), and month 12 (M12-January 2022). Eating patterns were negatively impacted at the M0, with reported increases in snacking/grazing (69.7%), fast food/take-out consumption (57.8%), and alcohol (48.8%). However, by M6 and M12 there were no statistically significant differences in eating patterns, suggesting that eating patterns normalized over time. Mean weight increased from PP0 to M0 by 2.99 pounds (p < 0.001, n = 226) and from PP0 to M6 by 2.12 pounds (p < 0.027, n = 146), though the difference in mean weight from PP0 to M12 was not statistically significant (n = 122). PA counts decreased from 8.00 sessions per week PP0 to 6.80 by M0 (p = 0.005) before jumping to 12.00 at M6 (p < 0.001) and 10.67 at M12 (p < 0.001). Psychological factors comparing M0 to M12 found statistically significant differences for depression (p-value = 0.018) and anxiety (p-value = 0.001), meaning depression and anxiety were initially increased but improved by M12. Additionally, higher scores on depression and insomnia scales were associated with lower PA levels. These overall results imply that the COVID-19 pandemic had immediate effects on the eating patterns, weight changes, PA, and psychological factors of HCWs; however, routines and lifestyle habits appeared to have normalized one year later.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Life Style , Exercise , Habits , Health Personnel
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115978

ABSTRACT

The aim of this research was to analyze the lifestyles of adults from Spanish-speaking countries in South America during the COVID-19 pandemic using a cross-sectional, analytical, and multicenter study. The target population was composed of people aged 18 and older who resided in South America during the pandemic; the final sample comprised 16,811 participants who were predominantly female, with ages ranging from 18 to 79 years. The results showed that approximately six out of ten respondents did not engage in any physical activity; only one in four respondents indicated that their diet was sufficient and balanced; and most washed their hands frequently and showered every day. Regarding the type of isolation, half reported that it was voluntary and the rest mandatory or restricted. Regarding mobility, six out of ten surveyed leave their residence on a weekly basis. Regarding the use of personal protective equipment, the majority used masks and a smaller proportion used gloves. In conclusion, the majority of respondents did not perform any physical activity; moreover, one in four reported having a sufficient balanced diet. We therefore recommend an improvement of public policies to promote better lifestyles in South America, in particular the reorientation of the health system to prevent similar situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Female , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , South America/epidemiology , Life Style
18.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e064916, 2022 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118672

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Many people living with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are expected to self-manage their condition. Patient activation is the term given to describe the knowledge, skills and confidence a person has in managing their own health and is closely related to the engagement in preventive health behaviours. Self-management interventions have the potential to improve remote disease management and health outcomes. We are testing an evidence-based and theory-based digital self-management structured 10-week programme developed for peoples with CKD called 'My Kidneys & Me'. The primary aim of the study (Self-Management Intervention through Lifestyle Education for Kidney health (SMILE-K)) is to assess the effect on patient activation levels. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A single-blind randomised controlled trial (RCT) with a nested pilot study will assess the feasibility of the intervention and study design before continuation to a full RCT. Individuals aged 18 years or older, with established CKD stage 3-4 (eGFR of 15-59 mL/min/1.73 m2) will be recruited through both primary and secondary care pathways. Participants will be randomised into two groups: intervention group (receive My Kidneys & Me in addition to usual care) and control group (usual care). The primary outcome of the nested pilot study is feasibility and the primary outcome of the full RCT is the Patient Activation Measu (PAM-13). The full RCT will assess the effect of the programme on online self-reported outcomes which will be assessed at baseline, after 10 weeks, and then after 20 weeks in both groups. A total sample size of N=432 participants are required based on a 2:1 randomisation. A substudy will measure physiological changes (eg, muscle mass, physical function) and patient experience (qualitative semi-structured interviews). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study was fully approved by the Research Ethics Committee-Leicester South on the 19 November 2020 (reference: 17/EM/0357). All participants are required to provide informed consent obtained online. The results are expected to be published in scientific journals and presented at clinical research conferences. This is protocol version 1.0 dated 27 January 2021. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN18314195.


Subject(s)
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Self-Management , Humans , Pilot Projects , Self-Management/methods , Feasibility Studies , Quality of Life , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy , Life Style , Kidney , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
19.
Health Rep ; 33(11): 27-34, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118338

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The Statistics Canada Biobank (Biobank) is a valuable source of nationally representative health information. It contains biospecimens collected from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) and the Canadian COVID-19 Antibody and Health Survey (CCAHS). Both surveys are voluntary and aim to collect a variety of important health information from Canadians to create nationally representative estimates. This information is collected through questionnaires, physical measures, and self-administered sample collection. Biospecimens collected as part of the CHMS and CCAHS from consenting participants include whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, DNA samples, and dried blood spots. These samples are stored as part of the Biobank for future health research. Canadian researchers can apply to the Biobank program to use this nationally representative source of biospecimens. Results obtained from their research can also be combined with a wide variety of health and lifestyle information collected as part of the CHMS and CCAHS, making the Biobank a rich source of health-related information that can fill data gaps on the health concerns that are important to Canadians. This data resource profile provides an overview of the Biobank to inform researchers and data users about the program and how it can be used as a resource for the advancement of health-related research.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Health Surveys , Life Style
20.
Ann Nutr Metab ; 78 Suppl 3: 1-63, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098084

ABSTRACT

It is a plaesaure to announce the celebration of the XXXI Congress of the Spanish Nutrition Society that will be held in Cartagena (Murcia, Spain), from September 15th to 17th, 2022. As is already a tradition in our society, the day before, on September 14th, the IX Meeting of young researchers will take place, aimed at promoting interaction and knowledge exchange among young people working in the field of nutrition and food in Spain. In addition, young reserachers will receive a workshop about how to produce videos of research with high impact in the social media. The congress will offer a scientific and multidisciplinary journey through all aspects related to a personalized diet from children to adults, healthy, safe and sustainable. The connections between lifestyles and chronic non-communicable diseases and especially obesity, will be updated, as well as precision nutrition, incorporating the outstanding advances in nutrigenomics, epigenetics and metabolomic markers. New evidence of healthy effects of bioactive, prebiotic and probiotic components is also contemplated, without forgetting the issue of food allergies and intolerances, which are increasingly prevalent in our society. The circular economy and the new preferences for sustainable and local food pose challenges that will also be addressed at the congress and in the sessions for young researchers. In addition, the problem generated by the dissemination of nutritional information poorly contrasted in the media and social networks will be considered. We encourage you to schedule these dates in your 2022 agenda to attend and participate in our congress, whose program we have designed with great enthusiasm. We would also like to extend the invitation to participate to companies and institutions related to food, which will help us reflect that optimal food is only achieved with the involvement of EVERYONE. We hope that the proposal of this congress will be attractive to you and that we can share enriching experiences in Cartagena, Spain. The program of the congress is available in the URL https://www.xxxicongresosen2022.com/index.asp Yours sincerely, Elvira Larqué Daza, Organizer of the Spanish Nutrition Society (SEÑ) Congress 2022, Cartagena, Spain. Salvador Zamora Navarro, Honour member from the Spanish Nutrition Society (SEÑ). María Puy Portillo Baquedano, President of the Spanish Nutrition Society (SEÑ).


Subject(s)
Diet , Nutritional Status , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Life Style , Spain
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