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1.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1135313, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238660

ABSTRACT

The rapid development of intelligent technologies coupled with the stay-at-home trends in the Post-COVID-19 Era has significantly changed youth's health behavior as well as reshaped their lifestyles. Digital health technologies (DHTs) have been more and more used for health management among youngsters. However, little was known about the use of DHTs among youths and its consequences on their health, especially in developing countries like China. Inspired by behavior intervention technology (BIT) model, this study examined the underlying mechanisms of use and social interactions of DHTs on Chinese adolescents' and youngsters' healthy lifestyles and mental health, using a representatively national survey among high school and freshman students in China (N = 2,297). It found that use of DHTs had a significantly positive effect on Chinese youths' healthy lifestyles and mental health, with behavioral regulation as a mediator. However, social interactions of DHTs were negatively associated with their mental health. The findings contribute to a better guidance on health promotion, as well as the enhanced design of DHTs' products.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Digital Technology , Health Promotion , Life Style , Adolescent , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , East Asian People , Mental Health
2.
Nutrients ; 15(11)2023 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233371

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social isolation during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic affected people's body weight, therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the association between lifestyle elements and the change in BMI during lockdown. METHODS: This retrospective observational study involved 290 questionnaires completed by adult participants divided into three groups according to BMI change during isolation. The structured questionnaire included a general description of the study objective and collected data regarding sociodemographics, anthropometrics, physical activity, sedentary behaviour, sleep duration, and food intake pre- and during COVID-19 lockdown. RESULTS: A decrease or increase in BMI was found in 23.6% and 47.8% of women and 18.5% and 42.6% of men, respectively. Among those who lost weight, 46.5% of women and 40% of men followed a diet of their own choice, 30.2% of women and 25% of men changed their product mix and reduced their intake, 40% of men stopped eating outside the home. An increase in BMI was associated with increased food intake (32.2% of women and 28.3% of men), increased sleep duration on weekdays (49.2% of women and 43.5% of men) and, in more than 50% of subjects, decreased physical activity. In women, increased BMI was associated with the highest frequency of snacking (p = 0.0003), the highest intake of sweets (p = 0.0021), and in men with the highest intake of alcohol (p = 0.0017). CONCLUSIONS: The observed changes in BMI during social isolation were the result of lifestyle modifications including dietary behaviour and differed by gender.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Feeding Behavior , Communicable Disease Control , Life Style
3.
Nutrients ; 15(11)2023 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231876

ABSTRACT

Lifestyle factors such as dietary habits, perceived weight, sleep, and physical activity worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through this study, we aimed to understand the impact of COVID-19 on these lifestyle factors in Bahrain. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1005 adult Bahrainis. Data were collected online using a structured and validated questionnaire for the assessment of eating habits, physical activity, and lifestyle during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were snowballed through those who agreed to answer the online questionnaire. There was a higher consumption of fast food, and a higher dependence on takeaways during the COVID-19 pandemic. About 63.5% of the participants consumed >4 meals per day, compared to 36.5% before the COVID-19. About 30% reported consumption of sugar sweetened beverages from two to three times a day. Weight loss was predominantly observed in persons exercising 1-3 times a week. The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was also high, with about 19% reporting drinking sweet beverages once every day, 10.6% from two to three times a day, and 40.4% from one to four times a week. A higher proportion of the participants reported poor sleep quality during the pandemic (31.2%) compared to before (12.2%), and 39.7% of the participants reported feeling lazy. Screen time use also doubled during the pandemic, with participants spending more than five hours per day on screens for entertainment, which went from 22.4% before to 51.9% during the pandemic. The lifestyle and dietary habits changed drastically for our study participants during the pandemic. The increased reliance on processed fast food instead of healthier options is a challenge to be tackled in any future pandemic situation. Future research needs to focus on strategies to promote healthier lifestyle modifications during situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Bahrain/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Life Style , Internet , Feeding Behavior
5.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 1026, 2023 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235181

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on public health in several ways. The aim of the study was to investigate changes in lifestyle, adiposity, and cardiometabolic markers among young adults in Sweden during the COVID-19 pandemic and their determinants. METHODS: The study included 1 004 participants from the population-based birth cohort BAMSE. Anthropometrics, body composition (bioelectric impedance analyses), pulse, and blood pressure were measured before (December 2016-May 2019; mean age 22.6 years) and during (October 2020-June 2021; mean age 25.7 years) the COVID-19 pandemic. Lifestyle changes during the pandemic were assessed through a questionnaire. RESULTS: All measures of adiposity (weight, BMI, body fat percentage, trunk fat percentage) and cardiometabolic markers (blood pressure, pulse) increased during the study period (e.g., body fat percentage by a median of + 0.8% in females, p < 0.001, and + 1.5% in males, p < 0.001). Male sex, non-Scandinavian ethnicity, BMI status (underweight and obesity), and changes in lifestyle factors, e.g., decreased physical activity during the pandemic, were associated with higher increase in BMI and/or adiposity. CONCLUSION: Lifestyle factors, adiposity and cardiometabolic markers may have been adversely affected among young adults in Sweden during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the preceding years. Targeted public health measures to reduce obesity and improve healthy lifestyle are important to prevent future non-communicable diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Female , Male , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Adiposity , Pandemics , Sweden/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Obesity , Life Style , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , Risk Factors
6.
Acta sci., Health sci ; 44: e57231, Jan. 14, 2022.
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2317160

ABSTRACT

Aim of the present study was to assess physical activity, nutrition and psychological status of the population during lockdown due to covid-19. Online survey was conductedamong 534 participants within the age range of 16-78 years using convenient sampling. Participantsfrom varied regions within India and abroad were enrolled for the present study. Volunteered participants were solicited to take part in a survey that has to be carried out by filling an online questionnaire form available to them as a URL link in the invitation through WhatsApp/Messenger. The gathered data has been compiled, coded and cleaned using Microsoft Excel. Analysis has been carried out employing descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS 17.0.Majority of participants in the studied population showed significant change in their nutrition and physical activity status due to lockdown. Covid-19 lockdown did limit their daily activities. It also had impacted their psychological status.The current investigation accentuates the need to pursue suitable life style for the maintenance of optimum metabolism and physiology. Sticking to more regular timetable of meals, effective management of stress levels and continued physical activity during the quarantine and in all the following phases of living is desirable.


Subject(s)
Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Exercise/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Mental Health , Feeding Behavior/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep , Social Behavior , Pandemics/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Interpersonal Relations , Life Style
7.
Trials ; 23(1): 596, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Large-scale trials of multidomain interventions show that modifying lifestyle and psychological risk factors can slow cognitive decline. We aim to determine if a lower intensity, personally tailored secondary dementia prevention programme for older people with subjective or mild objective memory decline, informed by behaviour change theory, reduces cognitive decline over 2 years. METHODS: A multi-site, single-blind randomised controlled trial recruiting 704 older adults at high dementia risk due to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or subjective cognitive decline (SCD). Participants are randomised using 1:1 allocation ratio to the APPLE Tree intervention versus control arm (dementia prevention information), stratified by site. The intervention explores and implements strategies to promote healthy lifestyle, increase pleasurable activities and social connections and improve long-term condition self-management. Two facilitators trained and supervised by a clinical psychologist deliver ten, 1-h group video call sessions over 6 months (approximately every fortnight), video-call 'tea breaks' (less structured, facilitated social sessions) in intervening weeks and individual goal-setting phone calls every 2 weeks. From 6 to 12 months, participants meet monthly for 'tea breaks', with those not attending receiving monthly goal-setting phone calls. Participants receive a food delivery, pedometer and website access to cognitive training and information about lifestyle modification. Follow-ups for all outcome measures are at 12 and 24 months. The primary outcome is cognition (Neuropsychological Test Battery (NTB) score) at 24 months. Secondary outcomes are quality of life, cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and wellbeing and lifestyle factors the intervention targets (diet, vascular risk, body weight, activity, sleep, anxiety, depression, social networks and loneliness, alcohol intake and smoking). Participants from purposively selected sites participate in qualitative process evaluation interviews, which will be analysed using thematic analytic methods. DISCUSSION: If effective, the intervention design, involving remote delivery and non-clinical facilitators, would facilitate intervention roll-out to older people with memory concerns. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN17325135 . Registration date 27 November 2019.


Subject(s)
Dementia , Malus , Aged , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Life Style , Quality of Life , Single-Blind Method , Tea , Technology
8.
Prev Med ; 172: 107525, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314203

ABSTRACT

While recent scholarship suggests that political affiliation is a robust predictor of pandemic behaviors and COVID-19 vaccination status, research has yet to examine whether the impact of political affiliation on these outcomes vary by age. Drawing on health lifestyles theory, we contribute to the social epidemiology of infectious disease behaviors by testing whether the impact of political affiliation on risky pandemic health lifestyles and COVID vaccination varies by age cohort. We employ data collected from the 2021 Crime, Health, and Politics Survey (CHAPS), a national study of adults from the United States, to formally assess this understudied association. In all models, Democrats reported less risky pandemic lifestyles compared to their Republican counterparts. Moreover, Democrats displayed greater odds of being vaccinated than Republicans or Independents. Further, the impact of political affiliation on vaccination status varied by age cohort, such that the impact of political affiliation was stronger among the oldest adults in our sample. Our analyses contribute to the growing study of politics and health lifestyles by challenging theoretical perspectives and cultural narratives that claim that older adults are less swayed by political influence when it comes to healthcare decisions. Our results help better our understanding of the ways in which political discourse shapes adopting public health recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Life Style , Vaccination , Politics
9.
Food Nutr Bull ; 44(2): 136-146, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the world experienced social distancing that resulted in changes in habits and lifestyle. Such changes can compromise healthy eating habits and the practice of physical activities, known risk factors for developing weight gain and obesity. OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to describe the change in eating habits, lifestyle, and cognition of the population of Rio Grande do Sul, a state in Southern Brazil, during social distancing due to COVID-19. METHODS: The study was conducted from July 21 to August 10, 2020, through a structured online questionnaire that asked for sociodemographic information (age, gender, and education), anthropometric (reported weight and height), change in eating habits, lifestyle (sleep quality and physical activity), and cognition. Chi-square, McNemar tests, and univariate and multivariate analysis were used to evaluate the variables. Confidence intervals were calculated with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Of a total of 1072 participants, 57.3% of respondents reported weight gain, and an increased percentage of people were classified as obese. Nearly half of the participants (46%) reported changes in their eating habits for the worse. Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with increased consumption of unhealthy foods. Our results identified high physical inactivity (46.9%) and obesity (19%) during social distancing. The changes in eating habits and lifestyle also increased the risk for decreased cognition. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlighted that social distancing impacted eating habits and lifestyle, which increased obesity rates and might predispose to decreased cognition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Brazil/epidemiology , Pandemics , Life Style , Weight Gain , Obesity/epidemiology , Feeding Behavior , Cognition
10.
Scand J Public Health ; 51(5): 764-768, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312724

ABSTRACT

AIMS: This study aimed to describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on lifestyle and social activities among older adults in Sweden, with a special focus on differences between the 'younger old' (aged 77-84) and 'older old' (aged 85-109). METHODS: This study is based on a nationally representative sample of older adults (aged ⩾77 years) in Sweden (SWEOLD). Data were collected between May 2021 and April 2022, when many recommendations were removed but the virus was still classified as a public health disease. We studied occurrences and differences between the two age groups in several lifestyle factors and social activities. RESULTS: The younger old displayed larger changes in lifestyles because of the pandemic than the older old. Most changes were found in social interactions with family. CONCLUSIONS: Our results highlight the large heterogeneity within the Swedish population aged ⩾77 years, and that the younger old experienced a bigger lifestyle change than the older old. Previous activity levels might be important to consider in order to understand how regulations may affect the older population. Finally, our findings indicate large age differences in Internet use, which require attention to prevent digital exclusion of an already vulnerable group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sweden/epidemiology , Pandemics , Life Style
11.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 43: 92-97, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2308119

ABSTRACT

This study aimed at verifying the relationship between lifestyle and emotional and behavioral problems in adolescents. This is an observational and cross-sectional study developed with adolescents from a capital city in the Brazilian Amazon. Data collection was performed using an electronic form containing items from the Fantastic Lifestyle and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire instruments. For data analysis, the bootstrap t-Test and calculation of Cohen's d statistic value were performed to assess the effect size of the difference between means. A total of 479 adolescents participated in the study. There was a high relationship between emotional and behavioral problems and lifestyle (p < 0.01; d = 1.36), especially regarding emotional problems (p < 0.01; d = 1.09), hyperactivity (p < 0.01; d = 0.92) and peer problems (p < 0.01; d = 0.78). The lifestyle attributes that were highly related to emotional and behavioral problems were insight (p < 0.01; d = 1.30), sleep, seatbelt, stress and safe sex (p < 0.01; d = 0.93), type of behavior (p < 0.01; d = 0.86) and career (p < 0.01; d = 0.85). It is therefore concluded that there was a high relationship between lifestyle and emotional and behavioral problems among the adolescents surveyed. Thus, it becomes necessary to promote socio-emotional skills and restorative and health-protective lifestyles in this population.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior , Mental Disorders , Problem Behavior , Humans , Adolescent , Problem Behavior/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Mental Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Life Style , Adolescent Behavior/psychology
12.
Nutrients ; 15(7)2023 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295130

ABSTRACT

Most studies suggest that COVID-19 has adversely affected the quality of life and mental health, including eating disorders. However, studies have yet to examine longitudinally the impact of COVID-19 on eating disorder symptomatic individuals. This study aims to examine longitudinally the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lifestyle and eating disorder symptoms of a symptomatic group of community-dwelling women. These women (n = 171) were enrolled in a longitudinal study, completed a COVID-19 modular self-report (post or Qualtrics, 2020/21), and participated in the current study. This study examined a 15th year follow-up. In 2020, 40% were tested for COVID-19. Of these, 87% had negative results; 5.3% self-isolated at home; 20.5% stopped working/studying in person; 28% continued online work/study; and 28% stopped work/studying in person. The pandemic affected sporting activities, music, and club activities (32.7% discontinued); 38% socialized in person; 16% socialized online; and 10% completely stopped socializing. Findings showed that the respondents showed no significant changes in levels of psychological distress (K10: 21.4 ± 9.8 vs. 19.0 ± 7.1, p < 0.171), and impaired quality of life (SF12: 50.9 ± 8.0 vs. 48.3 ± 9.5, p < 0.055) at 15-year follow-up. Eating disorder symptoms increased over time (EDE-Q global: 2.1 ± 1.4 vs. 2.9 ± 1.4, p < 0.013). Observed worsening of eating disorder-related symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic may be due to interrupted eating patterns, exercise restrictions and the absence of social support. Provision and access to interventions to support those affected by eating disorders are a high priority, especially during these times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Humans , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Quality of Life , Pandemics , Longitudinal Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Life Style , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology
13.
Eur J Clin Nutr ; 77(4): 460-467, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291718

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Further investigation is needed to define the impact of long-term pandemic lockdown in children. OBJECTIVES: To examine changes in body mass index z-score (zBMI), lifestyle, Health-Related Quality of Life and proportion of overweight or obesity (OW/OB) in 6- to 9-year-old children in Argentina. METHODS: Observational study with baseline measurements prior to lockdown and follow-up after eight months of strict restrictive measures (November 2020, first visit, n = 144) and after ten months of partial reopening (September 2021, second visit, n = 108). Anthropometric changes from baseline to first visit in lockdown group (LG) were compared with a historical control group (HCG, n = 134). Follow-up visits included anthropometric measures, lifestyle questionnaire and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. RESULTS: Change in zBMI was higher in LG [median, IQR: 0.46 (-0.00; 0.83)] vs HCG [median, IQR: 0.02 (-0.31; 0.27)]; p < 0.001, particularly in children with pre-existing OW/OB. In LG, zBMI was higher at first and second visit vs baseline (p < 0.001) and in second visit vs first visit for boys (p = 0.037) but not for girls. The proportion of children with OW/OB increased from baseline (43.5%) to first (56.5%) and second visit (58.3%) (p = 0.029). Unlike girls, the proportion of boys with OW/OB increased from baseline to first and second visit (p = 0.045). Change in zBMI was higher in children with less healthy habits (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Weight gain continued to increase in boys when lockdown measurements were eased, although sedentary behaviors decreased and quality of life improved, indicating that the effects of pandemic lockdown could be difficult to reverse.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Male , Female , Child , Humans , Follow-Up Studies , Quality of Life , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Obesity/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , Weight Gain , Overweight/epidemiology , Life Style
14.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 539, 2023 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296182

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: India currently has more than 74.2 million people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). This is predicted to increase to 124.9 million by 2045. In combination with controlling blood glucose levels among those with T2DM, preventing the onset of diabetes among those at high risk of developing it is essential. Although many diabetes prevention interventions have been implemented in resource-limited settings in recent years, there is limited evidence about their long-term effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability. Moreover, evidence on the impact of a diabetes prevention program on cardiovascular risk over time is limited. OBJECTIVES: The overall aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term cardiometabolic effects of the Kerala Diabetes Prevention Program (K-DPP). Specific aims are 1) to measure the long-term effectiveness of K-DPP on diabetes incidence and cardiometabolic risk after nine years from participant recruitment; 2) to assess retinal microvasculature, microalbuminuria, and ECG abnormalities and their association with cardiometabolic risk factors over nine years of the intervention; 3) to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness and return on investment of the K-DPP; and 4) to assess the sustainability of community engagement, peer-support, and other related community activities after nine years. METHODS: The nine-year follow-up study aims to reach all 1007 study participants (500 intervention and 507 control) from 60 randomized polling areas recruited to the original trial. Data are being collected in two phases. In phase 1 (Survey), we are admintsering a structured questionnaire, undertake physical measurements, and collect blood and urine samples for biochemical analysis. In phase II, we are inviting participants to undergo retinal imaging, body composition measurements, and ECG. All data collection is being conducted by trained Nurses. The primary outcome is the incidence of T2DM. Secondary outcomes include behavioral, psychosocial, clinical, biochemical, and retinal vasculature measures. Data analysis strategies include a comparison of outcome indicators with baseline, and follow-up measurements conducted at 12 and 24 months. Analysis of the long-term cost-effectiveness of the intervention is planned. DISCUSSION: Findings from this follow-up study will contribute to improved policy and practice regarding the long-term effects of lifestyle interventions for diabetes prevention in India and other resource-limited settings. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry-(updated from the original trial)ACTRN12611000262909; India: CTRI/2021/10/037191.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Humans , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/prevention & control , Follow-Up Studies , Incidence , Life Style
15.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284526, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296049

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess dietary intake and lifestyle habits followed during the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns, as well as the level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD), among a sample of the Lebanese population. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted during the government-enforced lockdown. A validated, online, questionnaire was used to collect information about dietary and lifestyle habits. The Mediterranean diet adherence screener (MEDAS) was used to assess adherence to the MD. RESULTS: A total of 1684 participants responded to the survey. Their mean age was 23.92 ± 7.62 years, and 70.4% were females. Approximately a third of the participants reported that their dietary habits did not change and 42.3% acknowledged that their eating habits deteriorated during the lockdown. Participants smoked less and slept more during the lockdown compared to before it. Approximately 19.2% of the sample reported low adherence to the MD whereas 63.9% and 16.9% described moderate and high adherence respectively. Only age was significantly associated with higher MD adherence. CONCLUSION: Dietary intake and MD adherence were suboptimal during the COVID-19 lockdown among the sample of the Lebanese population. It is critical that the Lebanese government implements public health programs in order to promote awareness about the importance of adhering to a healthy lifestyle and making appropriate dietary and lifestyle choices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, Mediterranean , Female , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Feeding Behavior , Life Style
16.
Scand J Public Health ; 51(5): 792-796, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297001

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The effects of COVID-19 containment measures on health-related lifestyle have been both favourable and unfavourable for health. Factors predisposing to unfavourable changes are still poorly known. In this short communication, we aimed to examine which socioeconomic and health-related factors predicted unfavourable lifestyle changes based on data from the same individuals before (2017) the pandemic and during the second wave (2020) of the pandemic in Finland. METHODS: This individual-level follow-up study was based on a nationally representative, two-stage stratified cluster sample of Finnish adults from the FinHealth 2017 Study, conducted in Spring 2017, and its follow-up survey, conducted in Autumn 2020. A total of 3834 men and women aged 25-69 years at baseline had information of selected lifestyle factors (vegetable consumption, leisure-time physical activity, sleeping problems and nightmares) available at both time points. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for unfavourable lifestyle changes (yes/no) according to socioeconomic and health-related factors were calculated using logistic regression models taking into account the sampling design and non-response. RESULTS: We found that those having poor health (i.e. psychological distress, poor self-rated health or chronic diseases) or disadvantaged socioeconomic background before the pandemic were prone to unfavourable lifestyle changes during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Observed unfavourable lifestyle changes in vulnerable population groups may accelerate health inequalities. Targeted health promotion actions are needed to prevent this unfavourable development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Male , Humans , Female , Follow-Up Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Life Style , Health Status
17.
Más Vita ; 4(2): 304-317, jun. 2022. tab
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2261137

ABSTRACT

El mundo ha convulsionado por la pandemia ocasionada por el coronavirus (COVID-19) que fuese reportado en diciembre de 2019 desde Wuhan-China, este virus tiene altas tasas de contagio y ocasiona severas enfermedades respiratorias e inclusive la muerte. Ante esta crisis, el confinamiento ha permitido controlar eficazmente la propagación. El impacto negativo sobre el estilo de vida constituye un nuevo factor de riesgo para el estado nutricional y de salud. Objetivo: Describir el estado de salud y nutrición de los/as nutricionistas durante el confinamiento por la covid-19: desde una perspectiva de género. Materiales y métodos: En este contexto, se desarrolló un estudio descriptivo, transversal y enfoque cuantitativo, para indagar algunas variables: sociodemográficas, económicas, condición de salud, y estado nutricional. Se aplicó una encuesta estructurada online dirigida a 359 nutricionistas graduados hasta el 28 de agosto de 2020 en la Universidad Técnica del Norte. Se usaron los correos electrónicos del Sistema Integrado Informático Universitario (SIIU). La muestra aleatoria fue de 136 profesionales, 95% de confianza (error = 6,7%). Resultados: El 79,41% fueron mujeres en su mayoría menores de 30 años y 20,59% hombres mayores de 30 años. El 59,56% tiene empleo, 23,52% en el área de salud. Los ingresos económicos de la mayor parte de hombres superan los 788 dólares. El 38,97% de la muestra tiene sobrepeso y el riesgo cardio metabólico afecta al 71,43% de hombres y 47,22% de mujeres, cerca del 25% poseen al menos una enfermedad crónica como: sobrepeso, hipotiroidismo, depresión/ansiedad e hipertensión arterial. El 32% tuvo familiares con Covid-19 de los cuales un 19,6% fallecieron. Conclusión: Los nutricionistas se han visto afectados en su situación laboral, económica, social y de salud(AU)


The world has been convulsed by the pandemic caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) that was reported in December 2019 from Wuhan-China, this virus has high rates of contagion and causes severe respiratory diseases and even death. In the face of this crisis, confinement has made it possible to effectively control the spread. The negative impact on lifestyle constitutes a new risk factor for nutritional and health status. Objective: To describe the state of health and nutrition of nutritionists during confinement due to covid-19: from a gender perspective. Materials and methods: In this context, a descriptive, cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach was developed to investigate some variables: sociodemographic, economic, health condition, and nutritional status. An online structured survey was applied to 359 nutritionists graduated until August 28, 2020 at the Universidad Técnica del Norte. The emails of the Integrated University Information System (SIIU) were used. The random sample was 136 professionals, 95% confidence (error = 6.7%). Results: 79.41% were women, mostly under 30 years of age, and 20.59% were men over 30 years of age. 59.56% have a job, 23.52% in the health area. The economic income of most men exceeds 788 dollars. 38.97% of the sample is overweight and cardiometabolic risk affects 71.43% of men and 47.22% of women, about 25% have at least one chronic disease such as: overweight, hypothyroidism, depression/anxiety and high blood pressure. 32% had relatives with Covid-19, of whom 19.6% died. Conclusion: Nutritionists have been affected in their work, economic, social and health situation(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Respiratory Tract Diseases , Nutritionists , COVID-19 , Nutritional Status , Risk Factors , Life Style , Obesity
18.
Clin Ter ; 174(2): 152-158, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2274793

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Working night shifts has been associated with negative mental health consequences such as depression, anxiety, and sleep problems. The objectives of this study were to determine the lifestyle behaviors (prevalence of nicotine, caffeine, cannabis, sleep-promoting medication, and alcohol use) and the association between job stress, sleep quality, anxiety, and depression among registered nurses working night shifts in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan in the COVID-19 era. Twenty-two registered nurses ranging from ages 25-65 that work permanent or rotating night shifts participated in an online survey from April 11th to July 15th, 2022. The results showed a strong positive association between sleep disturbance, and depression r (19) = 0.50, [p = 0.029, 95% CI, 0.06, 0.78]. A positive correlation was found between higher levels of reported anxiety and sleep disturbance r (19) = 0.69, [p = 0.001, 95% CI, 0.34, 0.87]. There was a positive correlation between depression and occupational exhaustion r (17) = 0.56, [p = 0.021, 95% CI, 0.10, 0.82]. Anxiety was significantly related to occupational exhaustion r (17) = 0.65, [p = 0.005, 95% CI, 0.24, 0.86] and depersonalization r (17) = 0.52, [p = 0.005, 95% CI, 0.06, 0.80], but not significantly related to personal accomplishment r (17) = -0.34, [p = 0.185, 95% CI, -0.70, 0.17]. In conclusion, a sample of Canadian nurses working night shifts in the province of Saskatchewan during the COVID-19 pandemic showed a significant positive relationship among sleep disturbance, anxiety, and depression. Furthermore, most nurses reported using at least one or more of the following substances: sleep-promoting medication, nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Work Schedule Tolerance , Pilot Projects , Nicotine , Pandemics , Canada/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep , Surveys and Questionnaires , Life Style
19.
Am J Health Behav ; 47(1): 40-46, 2023 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2254851

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In this study, we aimed to clarify and measure the interrelationships among decrease in communication, exercise, and physical and mental health under COVID-19 prevention measures, restricting individuals from going out of the house. Methods: Participants included 540 middle-aged and older adults who are regular exercise class members. The survey was conducted between April 15 and May 10, 2020. For the self- administered questionnaire survey, a municipal employee of City A and an exercise instructor visited the home of each participant to collect the survey data. The survey items were sex, age, limitation of going out, feeling of inactivity, interaction with others, health status, and forgetfulness; a covariance structural analysis was performed to clarify the interrelationship between lifestyle and health status. Results: Restrictions on going out due to the COVID-19 prevention measures were associated with the physical and mental health of middle-aged and older adults who regularly attended exercise classes because they enforced inactivity and decreased the frequency of conversation. Conclusions: Several waves of COVID-19 may arrive in Japan in the future. Therefore, it is necessary to implement measures to prevent secondary health damage and not focus only on infection prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Middle Aged , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Life Style , Health Status , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
J Contemp Dent Pract ; 23(9): 866-871, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2259180

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study was carefully designed to analyze the perceived psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic among Roseman dental students. Students assessed their perceived changes in stress, self-esteem, and lifestyle behavior changes based on the impact of the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A self-designed, anonymous, 18-item questionnaire was administered to Roseman dental students after being approved by the Institutional Review Board. Independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA were utilized for comparison of psychological factors toward gender, as well as year of study. Chi-square correlations between stress and self-esteem, as well as lifestyle behavior, were also reported. RESULTS: In total, 313 students with a mean age of 28.15 (SD:4.21) completed the survey. Statistically significant differences were shown between students based upon age and year of study, with regard to stress and lifestyle behavior changes. Cross-tabulations of stress with self-esteem and lifestyle behavior changes showed positive relationships, as students with higher levels of stress showed significant self-esteem problems and lifestyle behavior changes. The largest frequency of stress/anxiety and lifestyle behavioral changes was found in the age range of 25-34 years old, particularly in the Class of 2024 and 2025. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed a significant psychological impact on dental students at Roseman. However, further studies are needed to assess the long-lasting impacts of the pandemic on University healthcare students as a whole. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The pandemic has not only affected the way in which dental students progress academically but also as healthcare providers now and into the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Universities , Life Style , Students
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