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1.
BMC Pharmacol Toxicol ; 22(1): 61, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477468

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence and rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) in thelate 2019 has caused a devastating global pandemic of the severe pneumonia-like disease coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although vaccines have been and are being developed, they are not accessible to everyone and not everyone can receive these vaccines. Also, it typically takes more than 10 years until a new therapeutic agent is approved for usage. Therefore, repurposing of known drugs can lend itself well as a key approach for significantly expediting the development of new therapies for COVID-19. METHODS: We have incorporated machine learning-based computational tools and in silico models into the drug discovery process to predict Adsorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Toxicity (ADMET) profiles of 90 potential drugs for COVID-19 treatment identified from two independent studies mainly with the purpose of mitigating late-phase failures because of inferior pharmacokinetics and toxicity. RESULTS: Here, we summarize the cardiotoxicity and general toxicity profiles of 90 potential drugs for COVID-19 treatment and outline the risks of repurposing and propose a stratification of patients accordingly. We shortlist a total of five compounds based on their non-toxic properties. CONCLUSION: In summary, this manuscript aims to provide a potentially useful source of essential knowledge on toxicity assessment of 90 compounds for healthcare practitioners and researchers to find off-label alternatives for the treatment for COVID-19. The majority of the molecules discussed in this manuscript have already moved into clinical trials and thus their known pharmacological and human safety profiles are expected to facilitate a fast track preclinical and clinical assessment for treating COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/toxicity , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , Drug Repositioning , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Captopril/therapeutic use , Cardiotoxins/toxicity , Catechols/therapeutic use , Computational Biology , Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System/metabolism , Drug Discovery/methods , Humans , Indomethacin/therapeutic use , Linezolid/therapeutic use , Liver/drug effects , Mice , Models, Biological , Nitriles/therapeutic use , Rats , Reproduction/drug effects , Software , Valproic Acid/therapeutic use
2.
J Med Virol ; 93(7): 4411-4419, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263106

ABSTRACT

In late December 2019, an outbreak of a novel coronavirus which caused coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was initiated. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was associated with higher severity and mortality of COVID-19. We aimed to evaluate the effects of comorbidities and medications in addition to determining the association between AKI, antibiotics against coinfections (AAC) and outcomes of patients. We conducted a retrospective study on adult patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in a tertiary center. Our primary outcomes were the incidence rate of AKI based on comorbidities and medications. The secondary outcome was to determine mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and prolonged hospitalization by AKI and AAC. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression method was used to explore predictive effects of AKI and AAC on outcomes. Out of 854 included participants, 118 patients developed AKI in whom, 57 used AAC and 61 did not. Hypertension and diabetes were the most common comorbidities in patients developed AKI. AAC, lopinavir/ritonavir, ribavirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers, and corticosteroids had significant higher rate of administration in patients developed AKI. AAC were associated with higher deaths (odds ratio [OR] = 5.13; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3-8.78) and ICU admission (OR = 5.87; 95%CI: 2.81-12.27), while AKI had higher OR for prolonged hospitalization (3.37; 95%CI: 1.76-6.45). Both AKI and AAC are associated with poor prognosis of COVID-19. Defining strict criteria regarding indications and types of antibiotics would help overcoming concomitant infections and minimizing related adverse events.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/prevention & control , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Drug Combinations , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Linezolid/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Ribavirin/therapeutic use , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome , Vancomycin/therapeutic use
4.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 34(5): 1-4, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183033

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In this case report, the treatment of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer on his left foot was interrupted by the novel coronavirus 2019 pandemic lockdown in India. The author guided the patient via telephone and online services. Based on the history given by the patient, the lesion started as blistering from improperly fitted footwear that then evolved into multiple infected ulcerations on the dorsal surface of the great toe (osteomyelitis with septic arthritis of the joint). Based on a radiograph and other photographs of the foot lesions, the author prescribed amoxicillin/clavulanic acid in combination with linezolid for 2 weeks. Further, the author guided the patient to dress the wound at home using a medical-grade honey-based product. With no option for an outpatient visit, the author guided the patient to use a plastic ruler and place it below the toe during each dressing. Healing (complete epithelialization) was achieved within 4 weeks.


Subject(s)
Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination/therapeutic use , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Honey , Linezolid/therapeutic use , Amputation , Bandages , COVID-19 , Humans , India , Male , Shoes , Telemedicine , Wound Healing
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(2): e23923, 2021 Jan 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039765

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2; no specific effective medication to treat the disease has been identified to date. We aimed to investigate the administered medications and intervention times for patients who completely recovered from COVID-19.This single-center, retrospective, observational study included 55 patients with COVID-19 who were transferred to Shenyang Sixth People's Hospital between January 20 and March 15, 2020. Data on demographics, symptoms, laboratory indicators, treatment processes, and clinical outcomes were collected. Administered drugs and intervention times were compared in 47 and 8 patients with mild and severe symptoms, respectively.All 55 patients recovered. Fifty-three patients (96.36%) received antiviral therapy, including 45 in the mild group (median treatment: 14 days; 17 received umifenovir) and all 8 severe-group patients (median treatment: 17.5 days; 4 received lopinavir/ritonavir). Twenty-nine patients (52.72%) were administered antibiotics, including 21 in the mild group (median treatment: 13.5 days; 15 received moxifloxacin) and all 8 in the severe group (median treatment: 9 days; 2 received linezolid). Moreover, 7 patients (12.72%) were treated with glucocorticoids and 9 (16.36%) with immunomodulators.Given the 100% recovery rate, early administration of antiviral drugs can be considered. Umifenovir may benefit patients with mild symptoms, while lopinavir/ritonavir may benefit those with severe symptoms. Prophylactic administration of common antibiotics may reduce the risk of co-infection. The use of glucocorticoids is usually not necessary. Randomized, double-blind, and controlled trials remain necessary for more accurate conclusions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , China , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Indoles/therapeutic use , Linezolid/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Moxifloxacin/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , Ritonavir/therapeutic use
6.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(4): 859-869, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-898040

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide. Bacterial co-infections are associated with unfavourable outcomes in respiratory viral infections; however, microbiological and antibiotic data related to COVID-19 are sparse. Adequate use of antibiotics in line with antibiotic stewardship (ABS) principles is warranted during the pandemic. We performed a retrospective study of clinical and microbiological characteristics of 140 COVID-19 patients admitted between February and April 2020 to a German University hospital, with a focus on bacterial co-infections and antimicrobial therapy. The final date of follow-up was 6 May 2020. Clinical data of 140 COVID-19 patients were recorded: The median age was 63.5 (range 17-99) years; 64% were males. According to the implemented local ABS guidelines, the most commonly used antibiotic regimen was ampicillin/sulbactam (41.5%) with a median duration of 6 (range 1-13) days. Urinary antigen tests for Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus peumoniae were negative in all cases. In critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (n = 50), co-infections with Enterobacterales (34.0%) and Aspergillus fumigatus (18.0%) were detected. Blood cultures collected at admission showed a diagnostic yield of 4.2%. Bacterial and fungal co-infections are rare in COVID-19 patients and are mainly prevalent in critically ill patients. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of antimicrobial therapy on therapeutic outcome in COVID-19 patients to prevent antimicrobial overuse. ABS guidelines could help in optimising the management of COVID-19. Investigation of microbial patterns of infectious complications in critically ill COVID-19 patients is also required.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ampicillin/therapeutic use , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Aspergillosis/epidemiology , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Cohort Studies , Coinfection/epidemiology , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/drug therapy , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/epidemiology , Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy , Escherichia coli Infections/epidemiology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella Infections/epidemiology , Linezolid/therapeutic use , Male , Meropenem/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Piperacillin, Tazobactam Drug Combination/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcal Infections/epidemiology , Streptococcal Infections/drug therapy , Streptococcal Infections/epidemiology , Sulbactam/therapeutic use , Vancomycin/therapeutic use , Young Adult
7.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 26(8): 1939-1941, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-133114
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