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1.
Microbiol Spectr ; 10(1): e0127121, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752773

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global outbreak and prompted an enormous research effort. Still, the subcellular localization of the coronavirus in lungs of COVID-19 patients is not well understood. Here, the localization of the SARS-CoV-2 proteins is studied in postmortem lung material of COVID-19 patients and in SARS-CoV-2-infected Vero cells, processed identically. Correlative light and electron microscopy on semithick cryo-sections demonstrated induction of electron-lucent, lipid-filled compartments after SARS-CoV-2 infection in both lung and cell cultures. In lung tissue, the nonstructural protein 4 and the stable nucleocapsid N-protein were detected on these novel lipid-filled compartments. The induction of such lipid-filled compartments and the localization of the viral proteins in lung of patients with fatal COVID-19 may explain the extensive inflammatory response and provide a new hallmark for SARS-CoV-2 infection at the final, fatal stage of infection. IMPORTANCE Visualization of the subcellular localization of SARS-CoV-2 proteins in lung patient material of COVID-19 patients is important for the understanding of this new virus. We detected viral proteins in the context of the ultrastructure of infected cells and tissues and discovered that some viral proteins accumulate in novel, lipid-filled compartments. These structures are induced in Vero cells but, more importantly, also in lung of patients with COVID-19. We have characterized these lipid-filled compartments and determined that this is a novel, virus-induced structure. Immunogold labeling demonstrated that cellular markers, such as CD63 and lipid droplet marker PLIN-2, are absent. Colocalization of lipid-filled compartments with the stable N-protein and nonstructural protein 4 in lung of the last stages of COVID-19 indicates that these compartments play a key role in the devastating immune response that SARS-CoV-2 infections provoke.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , Lipids/analysis , Lung/metabolism , Nucleocapsid/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Aged , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Child, Preschool , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Lung/cytology , Lung/pathology , Lung/ultrastructure , Male , Microscopy, Immunoelectron , Middle Aged , Nucleocapsid/metabolism , Rabbits , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Vero Cells/virology
2.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 1558860, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622112

ABSTRACT

Increasing outbreaks of new pathogenic viruses have promoted the exploration of novel alternatives to time-consuming vaccines. Thus, it is necessary to develop a universal approach to halt the spread of new and unknown viruses as they are discovered. One such promising approach is to target lipid membranes, which are common to all viruses and bacteria. The ongoing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has reaffirmed the importance of interactions between the virus envelope and the host cell plasma membrane as a critical mechanism of infection. Metadichol®, a nanolipid emulsion of long-chain alcohols, has been demonstrated as a strong candidate that inhibits the proliferation of SARS-CoV-2. Naturally derived substances, such as long-chain saturated lipid alcohols, reduce viral infectivity, including that of coronaviruses (such as SARS-CoV-2) by modifying their lipid-dependent attachment mechanism to human host cells. The receptor ACE2 mediates the entry of SARS-CoV-2 into the host cells, whereas the serine protease TMPRSS2 primes the viral S protein. In this study, Metadichol® was found to be 270 times more potent an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 (EC50 = 96 ng/mL) than camostat mesylate (EC50 = 26000 ng/mL). Additionally, it inhibits ACE with an EC50 of 71 ng/mL, but it is a very weak inhibitor of ACE2 at an EC50 of 31 µg/mL. Furthermore, the live viral assay performed in Caco-2 cells revealed that Metadichol® inhibits SARS-CoV-2 replication at an EC90 of 0.16 µg/mL. Moreover, Metadichol® had an EC90 of 0.00037 µM, making it 2081 and 3371 times more potent than remdesivir (EC50 = 0.77 µM) and chloroquine (EC50 = 1.14 µM), respectively.


Subject(s)
Fatty Alcohols/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viruses/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Esters/pharmacology , Guanidines/pharmacology , Humans , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , Lipids/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Serine Endopeptidases/drug effects , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Serine Proteases/metabolism , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Attachment/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects
3.
Bioorg Med Chem ; 46: 116356, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347508

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, periodic recurrence of viral infections, and the emergence of challenging variants has created an urgent need of alternative therapeutic approaches to combat the spread of viral infections, failing to which may pose a greater risk to mankind in future. Resilience against antiviral drugs or fast evolutionary rate of viruses is stressing the scientific community to identify new therapeutic approaches for timely control of disease. Host metabolic pathways are exquisite reservoir of energy to viruses and contribute a diverse array of functions for successful replication and pathogenesis of virus. Targeting the host factors rather than viral enzymes to cease viral infection, has emerged as an alternative antiviral strategy. This approach offers advantage in terms of increased threshold to viral resistance and can provide broad-spectrum antiviral action against different viruses. The article here provides substantial review of literature illuminating the host factors and molecular mechanisms involved in innate/adaptive responses to viral infection, hijacking of signalling pathways by viruses and the intracellular metabolic pathways required for viral replication. Host-targeted drugs acting on the pathways usurped by viruses are also addressed in this study. Host-directed antiviral therapeutics might prove to be a rewarding approach in controlling the unprecedented spread of viral infection, however the probability of cellular side effects or cytotoxicity on host cell should not be ignored at the time of clinical investigations.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Positive-Strand RNA Viruses/drug effects , Animals , Cytokines/metabolism , Frameshifting, Ribosomal/drug effects , Frameshifting, Ribosomal/physiology , Glycosylation/drug effects , Humans , Immunity/drug effects , Immunity/physiology , Lipid Metabolism/drug effects , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/drug effects , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/physiology , Polyamines/metabolism , Positive-Strand RNA Viruses/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/physiology , Ubiquitination/drug effects , Ubiquitination/physiology
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 2941, 2021 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062774

ABSTRACT

In recent months, Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread throughout the world. COVID-19 patients show mild, moderate or severe symptoms with the latter ones requiring access to specialized intensive care. SARS-CoV-2 infections, pathogenesis and progression have not been clearly elucidated yet, thus forcing the development of many complementary approaches to identify candidate cellular pathways involved in disease progression. Host lipids play a critical role in the virus life, being the double-membrane vesicles a key factor in coronavirus replication. Moreover, lipid biogenesis pathways affect receptor-mediated virus entry at the endosomal cell surface and modulate virus propagation. In this study, targeted lipidomic analysis coupled with proinflammatory cytokines and alarmins measurement were carried out in serum of COVID-19 patients characterized by different severity degree. Serum IL-26, a cytokine involved in IL-17 pathway, TSLP and adiponectin were measured and correlated to lipid COVID-19 patient profiles. These results could be important for the classification of the COVID-19 disease and the identification of therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , Alarmins/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , Discriminant Analysis , Female , Humans , Least-Squares Analysis , Lipids/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
5.
World J Gastroenterol ; 27(1): 37-54, 2021 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052513

ABSTRACT

The term lipidome is mentioned to the total amount of the lipids inside the biological cells. The lipid enters the human gastrointestinal tract through external source and internal source. The absorption pathway of lipids in the gastrointestinal tract has many ways; the 1st way, the lipid molecules are digested in the lumen before go through the enterocytes, digested products are re-esterified into complex lipid molecules. The 2nd way, the intracellular lipids are accumulated into lipoproteins (chylomicrons) which transport lipids throughout the whole body. The lipids are re-synthesis again inside the human body where the gastrointestinal lipids are: (1) Transferred into the endoplasmic reticulum; (2) Collected as lipoproteins such as chylomicrons; or (3) Stored as lipid droplets in the cytosol. The lipids play an important role in many stages of the viral replication cycle. The specific lipid change occurs during viral infection in advanced viral replication cycle. There are 47 lipids within 11 lipid classes were significantly disturbed after viral infection. The virus connects with blood-borne lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E to change viral infectivity. The viral interest is cholesterol- and lipid raft-dependent molecules. In conclusion, lipidome is important in gastrointestinal fat absorption and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection so lipidome is basic in gut metabolism and in COVID-19 infection success.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Absorption/physiology , Gastrointestinal Tract/physiopathology , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cholesterol/blood , Cholesterol/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Tract/metabolism , Humans , Lipidomics , Lipoproteins/blood , Lipoproteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
6.
Food Chem Toxicol ; 145: 111701, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728551

ABSTRACT

Obesity and its related metabolic disorders, as well as infectious diseases like covid-19, are important health risks nowadays. It was recently documented that long-term fasting improves metabolic health and enhanced the total antioxidant capacity. The present study investigated the influence of a 10-day fasting on markers of the redox status in 109 subjects. Reducing power, 2,2'-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt radical cation(ABTS) radical scavenging capacity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity increased significantly, and indicated an increase of circulating antioxidant levels. No differences were detected in superoxide scavenging capacity, protein carbonyls, and superoxide dismutase when measured at baseline and after 10 days of fasting. These findings were concomitant to a decrease in blood glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglycerides as well as an increase in total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio. In addition, the well-being index as well as the subjective energy levels increased, documenting a good tolerability. There was an interplay between redox and metabolic parameters since lipid peroxidation baseline levels (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances [TBARS]) affected the ability of long-term fasting to normalize lipid levels. A machine learning model showed that a combination of antioxidant parameters measured at baseline predicted the efficiency of the fasting regimen to decrease LDL levels. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that long-term fasting enhanced the endogenous production of antioxidant molecules, that act protectively against free radicals, and in parallel improved the metabolic health status. Our results suggest that the outcome of long-term fasting strategies could be depending on the baseline values of the antioxidative and metabolic status of subjects.


Subject(s)
Fasting/metabolism , Free Radical Scavengers/metabolism , Obesity/diet therapy , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , Lipid Peroxidation/physiology , Machine Learning , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/blood , Obesity/metabolism , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Young Adult
7.
Analyst ; 145(17): 5725-5732, 2020 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-663353

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is known as the causal agent for the current COVID-19 global pandemic. The majority of COVID-19 patients develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), while some experience a cytokine storm effect, which is considered as one of the leading causes of patient mortality. Lipids are known to be involved in the various stages of the lifecycle of a virus functioning as receptors or co-receptors that controls viral propagation inside the host cell. Therefore, lipid-related metabolomics aims to provide insight into the immune response of the novel coronavirus. Our study has focused on determination of the potential metabolomic biomarkers utilizing a Teslin® Substrate in paper spray mass spectrometry (PS-MS) for the development of a rapid detection test within 60 seconds of analysis time. In this study, results were correlated with PCR tests to reflect that the systemic responses of the cells were affected by the COVID-19 virus.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Discriminant Analysis , Humans , Lipids/analysis , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics , Paper , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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