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1.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572667

ABSTRACT

Pre-existing comorbidities such as obesity or metabolic diseases can adversely affect the clinical outcome of COVID-19. Chronic metabolic disorders are globally on the rise and often a consequence of an unhealthy diet, referred to as a Western Diet. For the first time in the Syrian hamster model, we demonstrate the detrimental impact of a continuous high-fat high-sugar diet on COVID-19 outcome. We observed increased weight loss and lung pathology, such as exudate, vasculitis, hemorrhage, fibrin, and edema, delayed viral clearance and functional lung recovery, and prolonged viral shedding. This was accompanied by an altered, but not significantly different, systemic IL-10 and IL-6 profile, as well as a dysregulated serum lipid response dominated by polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing phosphatidylethanolamine, partially recapitulating cytokine and lipid responses associated with severe human COVID-19. Our data support the hamster model for testing restrictive or targeted diets and immunomodulatory therapies to mediate the adverse effects of metabolic disease on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, High-Fat/adverse effects , Dietary Carbohydrates/adverse effects , Lipid Metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Cricetinae , Cytokines/blood , Disease Models, Animal , Edema , Fibrin , Hemorrhage , Humans , Interleukin-10 , Interleukin-6 , Lipidomics , Lipids/blood , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Male , Mesocricetus , Obesity , SARS-CoV-2 , Sugars , Vasculitis/pathology , Virus Shedding
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21633, 2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503836

ABSTRACT

Although the serum lipidome is markedly affected by COVID-19, two unresolved issues remain: how the severity of the disease affects the level and the composition of serum lipids and whether serum lipidome analysis may identify specific lipids impairment linked to the patients' outcome. Sera from 49 COVID-19 patients were analyzed by untargeted lipidomics. Patients were clustered according to: inflammation (C-reactive protein), hypoxia (Horowitz Index), coagulation state (D-dimer), kidney function (creatinine) and age. COVID-19 patients exhibited remarkable and distinctive dyslipidemia for each prognostic factor associated with reduced defense against oxidative stress. When patients were clustered by outcome (7 days), a peculiar lipidome signature was detected with an overall increase of 29 lipid species, including-among others-four ceramide and three sulfatide species, univocally related to this analysis. Considering the lipids that were affected by all the prognostic factors, we found one sphingomyelin related to inflammation and viral infection of the respiratory tract and two sphingomyelins, that are independently related to patients' age, and they appear as candidate biomarkers to monitor disease progression and severity. Although preliminary and needing validation, this report pioneers the translation of lipidome signatures to link the effects of five critical clinical prognostic factors with the patients' outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Lipids/blood , Serum/chemistry , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Dyslipidemias/metabolism , Female , Humans , Italy , Lipidomics/methods , Lipids/analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sphingomyelins/blood
3.
Immunology ; 164(3): 541-554, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488214

ABSTRACT

IL-33 and ATP are alarmins, which are released upon damage of cellular barriers or are actively secreted upon cell stress. Due to high-density expression of the IL-33 receptor T1/ST2 (IL-33R), and the ATP receptor P2X7, mast cells (MCs) are one of the first highly sensitive sentinels recognizing released IL-33 or ATP in damaged peripheral tissues. Whereas IL-33 induces the MyD88-dependent activation of the TAK1-IKK2-NF-κB signalling, ATP induces the Ca2+ -dependent activation of NFAT. Thereby, each signal alone only induces a moderate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lipid mediators (LMs). However, MCs, which simultaneously sense (co-sensing) IL-33 and ATP, display an enhanced and prolonged activation of the TAK1-IKK2-NF-κB signalling pathway. This resulted in a massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and GM-CSF as well as of arachidonic acid-derived cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated pro-inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxanes (TXs), hallmarks of strong MC activation. Collectively, these data show that co-sensing of ATP and IL-33 results in hyperactivation of MCs, which resembles to MC activation induced by IgE-mediated crosslinking of the FcεRI. Therefore, the IL-33/IL-33R and/or the ATP/P2X7 signalling axis are attractive targets for therapeutical intervention of diseases associated with the loss of integrity of cellular barriers such as allergic and infectious respiratory reactions.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Hypersensitivity/immunology , Interleukin-33/metabolism , Mast Cells/immunology , Animals , Anti-Allergic Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , Cell Degranulation/drug effects , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Eicosanoids/metabolism , Humans , Hypersensitivity/drug therapy , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/metabolism , Interleukin-33/antagonists & inhibitors , Lipidomics , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Knockout , NFATC Transcription Factors/genetics , Primary Cell Culture , Receptors, Purinergic P2X7/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438628

ABSTRACT

The reason behind the high inter-individual variability in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and patient's outcome is poorly understood. The present study targets the sphingolipid profile of twenty-four healthy controls and fifty-nine COVID-19 patients with different disease severity. Sera were analyzed by untargeted and targeted mass spectrometry and ELISA. Results indicated a progressive increase in dihydrosphingosine, dihydroceramides, ceramides, sphingosine, and a decrease in sphingosine-1-phosphate. These changes are associated with a serine palmitoyltransferase long chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1) increase in relation to COVID-19 severity. Severe patients showed a decrease in sphingomyelins and a high level of acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) that influences monosialodihexosyl ganglioside (GM3) C16:0 levels. Critical patients are characterized by high levels of dihydrosphingosine and dihydroceramide but not of glycosphingolipids. In severe and critical patients, unbalanced lipid metabolism induces lipid raft remodeling, leads to cell apoptosis and immunoescape, suggesting active sphingolipid participation in viral infection. Furthermore, results indicated that the sphingolipid and glycosphingolipid metabolic rewiring promoted by aSMase and GM3 is age-dependent but also characteristic of severe and critical patients influencing prognosis and increasing viral load. AUCs calculated from ROC curves indicated ceramides C16:0, C18:0, C24:1, sphingosine and SPTLC1 as putative biomarkers of disease evolution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Sphingolipids/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Lipidomics , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Sphingolipids/analysis , Sphingomyelins/analysis , Sphingomyelins/blood , Young Adult
5.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4543, 2021 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328844

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global health emergency. Various omics results have been reported for COVID-19, but the molecular hallmarks of COVID-19, especially in those patients without comorbidities, have not been fully investigated. Here we collect blood samples from 231 COVID-19 patients, prefiltered to exclude those with selected comorbidities, yet with symptoms ranging from asymptomatic to critically ill. Using integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and lipidomic profiles, we report a trans-omics landscape for COVID-19. Our analyses find neutrophils heterogeneity between asymptomatic and critically ill patients. Meanwhile, neutrophils over-activation, arginine depletion and tryptophan metabolites accumulation correlate with T cell dysfunction in critical patients. Our multi-omics data and characterization of peripheral blood from COVID-19 patients may thus help provide clues regarding pathophysiology of and potential therapeutic strategies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Critical Illness , Genomics/methods , Humans , Lipidomics/methods , Metabolomics/methods , Neutrophils/metabolism , Transcriptome/genetics
6.
Biosci Rep ; 41(8)2021 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327228

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which started in late 2019, has caused huge social and economic losses. A growing number of investigators are focusing on understanding the interaction of SARS-CoV-2 with host cellular processes to find therapeutic approaches. New data suggest that lipid metabolism may play a significant role in regulating the response of immune cells like macrophages to viral infection, thereby affecting the outcome of the disease. Therefore, understanding the role of lipid metabolism could help develop new therapeutic approaches to mitigate the social and economic cost of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Lipid Metabolism/immunology , Lipidomics , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , COVID-19/epidemiology , Homeostasis/immunology , Humans , Pandemics
7.
J Proteome Res ; 20(3): 1558-1570, 2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324404

ABSTRACT

Dexamethasone is a synthetic glucocorticoid medication vastly used to treat abnormal immune responses and inflammation. Although the medication is well-established in the medical community, the prolonged treatment with high dosages of dexamethasone may lead to severe adverse effects through mechanisms that are not yet well-known. Lipids are a large class of hydrophobic molecules involved in energy storage, signaling, modulation of gene expression, and membranes. Hence, untargeted lipidomics may help unravel the biochemical alterations following prolonged treatment with high dosages of dexamethasone. We performed comprehensive lipidomic analyses of brain, heart, kidney, liver, and muscle samples obtained from rats that were treated with intramuscular injections of dexamethasone for 14 weeks compared to healthy controls. The employed methodology and statistical analysis showed that phosphatidic acids, glycerophospholipids, plasmalogens, and fatty acids are deeply affected by prolonged use of the medication. Brain tissue was only mildly affected, but skeletal muscle showed a strong accumulation of lipids that may be correlated with alterations in the energy metabolism, myopathy, and oxidative processes. This work provides new insights into the mechanisms of action and adverse effects for one of the most commonly prescribed class of drugs in the world.


Subject(s)
Lipidomics , Lipids , Animals , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Fatty Acids , Glycerophospholipids , Rats
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 686240, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285294

ABSTRACT

A disruption of the crosstalk between the gut and the lung has been implicated as a driver of severity during respiratory-related diseases. Lung injury causes systemic inflammation, which disrupts gut barrier integrity, increasing the permeability to gut microbes and their products. This exacerbates inflammation, resulting in positive feedback. We aimed to test whether severe Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with markers of disrupted gut permeability. We applied a multi-omic systems biology approach to analyze plasma samples from COVID-19 patients with varying disease severity and SARS-CoV-2 negative controls. We investigated the potential links between plasma markers of gut barrier integrity, microbial translocation, systemic inflammation, metabolome, lipidome, and glycome, and COVID-19 severity. We found that severe COVID-19 is associated with high levels of markers of tight junction permeability and translocation of bacterial and fungal products into the blood. These markers of disrupted intestinal barrier integrity and microbial translocation correlate strongly with higher levels of markers of systemic inflammation and immune activation, lower levels of markers of intestinal function, disrupted plasma metabolome and glycome, and higher mortality rate. Our study highlights an underappreciated factor with significant clinical implications, disruption in gut functions, as a potential force that may contribute to COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Intestines/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Female , Glycomics , Haptoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Lipidomics , Male , Metabolomics , Middle Aged , Permeability , Protein Precursors/metabolism , Tight Junctions/metabolism
9.
Nat Metab ; 3(7): 909-922, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279905

ABSTRACT

Exosomes represent a subtype of extracellular vesicle that is released through retrograde transport and fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane1. Although no perfect methodologies currently exist for the high-throughput, unbiased isolation of pure plasma exosomes2,3, investigation of exosome-enriched plasma fractions of extracellular vesicles can confer a glimpse into the endocytic pathway on a systems level. Here we conduct high-coverage lipidomics with an emphasis on sterols and oxysterols, and proteomic analyses of exosome-enriched extracellular vesicles (EVs hereafter) from patients at different temporal stages of COVID-19, including the presymptomatic, hyperinflammatory, resolution and convalescent phases. Our study highlights dysregulated raft lipid metabolism that underlies changes in EV lipid membrane anisotropy that alter the exosomal localization of presenilin-1 (PS-1) in the hyperinflammatory phase. We also show in vitro that EVs from different temporal phases trigger distinct metabolic and transcriptional responses in recipient cells, including in alveolar epithelial cells, which denote the primary site of infection, and liver hepatocytes, which represent a distal secondary site. In comparison to the hyperinflammatory phase, EVs from the resolution phase induce opposing effects on eukaryotic translation and Notch signalling. Our results provide insights into cellular lipid metabolism and inter-tissue crosstalk at different stages of COVID-19 and are a resource to increase our understanding of metabolic dysregulation in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Lipidomics , Metabolomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Biological Transport , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell Fractionation , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Chemical Fractionation , Cluster Analysis , Computational Biology/methods , Exosomes/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lipidomics/methods , Metabolome , Metabolomics/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
10.
J Gen Virol ; 102(5)2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218064

ABSTRACT

Host cell lipids play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of respiratory virus infection. However, a direct comparison of the lipidomic profile of influenza virus and rhinovirus infections is lacking. In this study, we first compared the lipid profile of influenza virus and rhinovirus infection in a bronchial epithelial cell line. Most lipid features were downregulated for both influenza virus and rhinovirus, especially for the sphingomyelin features. Pathway analysis showed that sphingolipid metabolism was the most perturbed pathway. Functional study showed that bacterial sphingomyelinase suppressed influenza virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) replication, but promoted rhinovirus replication. These findings suggest that sphingomyelin pathway can be a potential target for antiviral therapy, but should be carefully evaluated as it has opposite effects on different respiratory viruses. Furthermore, the differential effect of sphingomyelinase on rhinovirus and influenza virus may explain the interference between rhinovirus and influenza virus infection.


Subject(s)
Orthomyxoviridae/drug effects , Rhinovirus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sphingomyelins/pharmacology , Animals , Bronchial Diseases/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line , Dogs , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Influenza, Human , Lipidomics , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/drug therapy , Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase , Virus Replication/drug effects
11.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 155, 2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189204

ABSTRACT

Disease progression prediction and therapeutic drug target discovery for Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are particularly important, as there is still no effective strategy for severe COVID-19 patient treatment. Herein, we performed multi-platform omics analysis of serial plasma and urine samples collected from patients during the course of COVID-19. Integrative analyses of these omics data revealed several potential therapeutic targets, such as ANXA1 and CLEC3B. Molecular changes in plasma indicated dysregulation of macrophage and suppression of T cell functions in severe patients compared to those in non-severe patients. Further, we chose 25 important molecular signatures as potential biomarkers for the prediction of disease severity. The prediction power was validated using corresponding urine samples and plasma samples from new COVID-19 patient cohort, with AUC reached to 0.904 and 0.988, respectively. In conclusion, our omics data proposed not only potential therapeutic targets, but also biomarkers for understanding the pathogenesis of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , Lipidomics , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Biomarkers/blood , Female , Humans , Male
12.
Gut ; 70(7): 1253-1265, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166535

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To characterise the oral microbiome, gut microbiome and serum lipid profiles in patients with active COVID-19 and recovered patients; evaluate the potential of the microbiome as a non-invasive biomarker for COVID-19; and explore correlations between the microbiome and lipid profile. DESIGN: We collected and sequenced 392 tongue-coating samples, 172 faecal samples and 155 serum samples from Central China and East China. We characterised microbiome and lipid molecules, constructed microbial classifiers in discovery cohort and verified their diagnostic potential in 74 confirmed patients (CPs) from East China and 37 suspected patients (SPs) with IgG positivity. RESULTS: Oral and faecal microbial diversity was significantly decreased in CPs versus healthy controls (HCs). Compared with HCs, butyric acid-producing bacteria were decreased and lipopolysaccharide-producing bacteria were increased in CPs in oral cavity. The classifiers based on 8 optimal oral microbial markers (7 faecal microbial markers) achieved good diagnostic efficiency in different cohorts. Importantly, diagnostic efficacy reached 87.24% in the cross-regional cohort. Moreover, the classifiers successfully diagnosed SPs with IgG antibody positivity as CPs, and diagnostic efficacy reached 92.11% (98.01% of faecal microbiome). Compared with CPs, 47 lipid molecules, including sphingomyelin (SM)(d40:4), SM(d38:5) and monoglyceride(33:5), were depleted, and 122 lipid molecules, including phosphatidylcholine(36:4p), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)(16:0p/20:5) and diglyceride(20:1/18:2), were enriched in confirmed patients recovery. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to characterise the oral microbiome in COVID-19, and oral microbiomes and lipid alterations in recovered patients, to explore their correlations and to report the successful establishment and validation of a diagnostic model for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/microbiology , Feces/microbiology , Lipids/blood , Mouth/microbiology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies , China , Cohort Studies , Female , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Lipidomics , Male , Middle Aged
13.
Biosci Rep ; 41(3)2021 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1149758

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a serious public health crisis worldwide. The symptoms of COVID-19 vary from mild to severe among different age groups, but the physiological changes related to COVID-19 are barely understood. METHODS: In the present study, a high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS)-based lipidomic strategy was used to characterize the endogenous plasma lipids for cured COVID-19 patients with different ages and symptoms. These patients were further divided into two groups: those with severe symptoms or who were elderly and relatively young patients with mild symptoms. In addition, automated lipidomic identification and alignment was conducted by LipidSearch software. Multivariate and univariate analyses were used for differential comparison. RESULTS: Nearly 500 lipid compounds were identified in each cured COVID-19 group through LipidSearch software. At the level of lipid subclasses, patients with severe symptoms or elderly patients displayed dramatic changes in plasma lipidomic alterations, such as increased triglycerides and decreased cholesteryl esters (ChE). Some of these differential lipids might also have essential biological functions. Furthermore, the differential analysis of plasma lipids among groups was performed to provide potential prognostic indicators, and the change in signaling pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Dyslipidemia was observed in cured COVID-19 patients due to the viral infection and medical treatment, and the discharged patients should continue to undergo consolidation therapy. This work provides valuable knowledge about plasma lipid markers and potential therapeutic targets of COVID-19 and essential resources for further research on the pathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Lipids/blood , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Case-Control Studies , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Female , Humans , Lipidomics , Male , Mass Spectrometry , Middle Aged , Plasma , Survivors , Young Adult
14.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(2): e1009243, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058312

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic emergence of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) poses a relevant threat to global health. SARS-CoV-2 infection is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations, ranging from absence of symptoms to severe forms that need intensive care treatment. Here, plasma-EDTA samples of 30 patients compared with age- and sex-matched controls were analyzed via untargeted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics and lipidomics. With the same approach, the effect of tocilizumab administration was evaluated in a subset of patients. Despite the heterogeneity of the clinical symptoms, COVID-19 patients are characterized by common plasma metabolomic and lipidomic signatures (91.7% and 87.5% accuracy, respectively, when compared to controls). Tocilizumab treatment resulted in at least partial reversion of the metabolic alterations due to SARS-CoV-2 infection. In conclusion, NMR-based metabolomic and lipidomic profiling provides novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanism of human response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and to monitor treatment outcomes.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Lipidomics , Lipids/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular
15.
World J Gastroenterol ; 27(1): 37-54, 2021 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052513

ABSTRACT

The term lipidome is mentioned to the total amount of the lipids inside the biological cells. The lipid enters the human gastrointestinal tract through external source and internal source. The absorption pathway of lipids in the gastrointestinal tract has many ways; the 1st way, the lipid molecules are digested in the lumen before go through the enterocytes, digested products are re-esterified into complex lipid molecules. The 2nd way, the intracellular lipids are accumulated into lipoproteins (chylomicrons) which transport lipids throughout the whole body. The lipids are re-synthesis again inside the human body where the gastrointestinal lipids are: (1) Transferred into the endoplasmic reticulum; (2) Collected as lipoproteins such as chylomicrons; or (3) Stored as lipid droplets in the cytosol. The lipids play an important role in many stages of the viral replication cycle. The specific lipid change occurs during viral infection in advanced viral replication cycle. There are 47 lipids within 11 lipid classes were significantly disturbed after viral infection. The virus connects with blood-borne lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E to change viral infectivity. The viral interest is cholesterol- and lipid raft-dependent molecules. In conclusion, lipidome is important in gastrointestinal fat absorption and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection so lipidome is basic in gut metabolism and in COVID-19 infection success.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Absorption/physiology , Gastrointestinal Tract/physiopathology , Lipid Metabolism/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cholesterol/blood , Cholesterol/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Tract/metabolism , Humans , Lipidomics , Lipoproteins/blood , Lipoproteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
16.
J Immunol ; 206(2): 329-334, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-961742

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected more than 20 million people worldwide, with mortality exceeding 800,000 patients. Risk factors associated with severe disease and mortality include advanced age, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. Each of these risk factors pathologically disrupts the lipidome, including immunomodulatory eicosanoid and docosanoid lipid mediators (LMs). We hypothesized that dysregulation of LMs may be a defining feature of the severity of COVID-19. By examining LMs and polyunsaturated fatty acid precursor lipids in serum from hospitalized COVID-19 patients, we demonstrate that moderate and severe disease are separated by specific differences in abundance of immune-regulatory and proinflammatory LMs. This difference in LM balance corresponded with decreased LM products of ALOX12 and COX2 and an increase LMs products of ALOX5 and cytochrome p450. Given the important immune-regulatory role of LMs, these data provide mechanistic insight into an immuno-lipidomic imbalance in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Eicosanoids , Lipidomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase/immunology , Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase/metabolism , Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase/immunology , Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase/metabolism , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cyclooxygenase 2/immunology , Cyclooxygenase 2/metabolism , Eicosanoids/blood , Eicosanoids/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
17.
J Proteome Res ; 19(11): 4455-4469, 2020 11 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889124

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 beta coronavirus is the etiological driver of COVID-19 disease, which is primarily characterized by shortness of breath, persistent dry cough, and fever. Because they transport oxygen, red blood cells (RBCs) may play a role in the severity of hypoxemia in COVID-19 patients. The present study combines state-of-the-art metabolomics, proteomics, and lipidomics approaches to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on RBCs from 23 healthy subjects and 29 molecularly diagnosed COVID-19 patients. RBCs from COVID-19 patients had increased levels of glycolytic intermediates, accompanied by oxidation and fragmentation of ankyrin, spectrin beta, and the N-terminal cytosolic domain of band 3 (AE1). Significantly altered lipid metabolism was also observed, in particular, short- and medium-chain saturated fatty acids, acyl-carnitines, and sphingolipids. Nonetheless, there were no alterations of clinical hematological parameters, such as RBC count, hematocrit, or mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, with only minor increases in mean corpuscular volume. Taken together, these results suggest a significant impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on RBC structural membrane homeostasis at the protein and lipid levels. Increases in RBC glycolytic metabolites are consistent with a theoretically improved capacity of hemoglobin to off-load oxygen as a function of allosteric modulation by high-energy phosphate compounds, perhaps to counteract COVID-19-induced hypoxia. Conversely, because the N-terminus of AE1 stabilizes deoxyhemoglobin and finely tunes oxygen off-loading and metabolic rewiring toward the hexose monophosphate shunt, RBCs from COVID-19 patients may be less capable of responding to environmental variations in hemoglobin oxygen saturation/oxidant stress when traveling from the lungs to peripheral capillaries and vice versa.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Erythrocytes , Membrane Lipids , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Erythrocytes/chemistry , Erythrocytes/cytology , Erythrocytes/pathology , Humans , Lipidomics , Membrane Lipids/analysis , Membrane Lipids/chemistry , Membrane Lipids/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/analysis , Membrane Proteins/chemistry , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Metabolome/physiology , Models, Molecular , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Proteome/analysis , Proteome/chemistry , Proteome/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Am Soc Mass Spectrom ; 31(10): 2013-2024, 2020 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744341

ABSTRACT

As corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a rapidly growing public health crisis across the world, our knowledge of meaningful diagnostic tests and treatment for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) is still evolving. This novel coronavirus disease COVID-19 can be diagnosed using RT-PCR, but inadequate access to reagents, equipment, and a nonspecific target has slowed disease detection and management. Precision medicine, individualized patient care, requires suitable diagnostics approaches to tackle the challenging aspects of viral outbreaks where many tests are needed in a rapid and deployable approach. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies such as proteomics, glycomics, lipidomics, and metabolomics have been applied in disease outbreaks for identification of infectious disease agents such as virus and bacteria and the molecular phenomena associated with pathogenesis. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) is widely used in clinical diagnostics in the United States and Europe for bacterial pathogen identification. Paper spray ionization mass spectrometry (PSI-MS), a rapid ambient MS technique, has recently open a new opportunity for future clinical investigation to diagnose pathogens. Ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS)-based metabolomics and lipidomics have been employed in large-scale biomedical research to discriminate infectious pathogens and uncover biomarkers associated with pathogenesis. PCR-MS has emerged as a new technology with the capability to directly identify known pathogens from the clinical specimens and the potential to identify genetic evidence of undiscovered pathogens. Moreover, miniaturized MS offers possible applications with relatively fast, highly sensitive, and potentially portable ways to analyze for viral compounds. However, beneficial aspects of these rapidly growing MS technologies in pandemics like COVID-19 outbreaks has been limited. Hence, this perspective gives a brief of the existing knowledge, current challenges, and opportunities for MS-based techniques as a promising avenue in studying emerging pathogen outbreaks such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Lipidomics/methods , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Metabolomics/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Proteomics/methods , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Glycomics/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
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