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1.
Molecules ; 27(1)2022 Jan 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613910

ABSTRACT

Hypercytokinemia, or cytokine storm, is one of the severe complications of viral and bacterial infections, involving the release of abnormal amounts of cytokines, resulting in a massive inflammatory response. Cytokine storm is associated with COVID-19 and sepsis high mortality rate by developing epithelial dysfunction and coagulopathy, leading to thromboembolism and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Anticoagulant therapy is an important tactic to prevent thrombosis in sepsis and COVID-19, but recent data show the incompatibility of modern direct oral anticoagulants and antiviral agents. It seems relevant to develop dual-action drugs with antiviral and anticoagulant properties. At the same time, it was shown that azolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines are heterocycles with a broad spectrum of antiviral activity. We have synthesized a new family of azolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and their condensed polycyclic analogs by cyclocondensation reactions and direct CH-functionalization and studied their anticoagulant properties. Five compounds among 1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ones and 5-alkyl-1,3,4-thiadiazolo[3,2-a]purin-8-ones demonstrated higher anticoagulant activity than the reference drug, dabigatran etexilate. Antithrombin activity of most active compounds was confirmed using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated blood to mimic the conditions of cytokine release syndrome. The studied compounds affected only the thrombin time value, reliably increasing it 6.5-15.2 times as compared to LPS-treated blood.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/pharmacology , Azo Compounds/chemistry , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Hemorrhage/drug therapy , Pyrimidines/chemistry , Animals , Anticoagulants/chemistry , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Male , Rabbits , Rats
2.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580557

ABSTRACT

The excessive synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6) is related to cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients. Moreover, blocking IL-6 has been suggested as a treatment strategy for inflammatory diseases such as sepsis. Sepsis is a severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome with high mortality. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-septic effects and the underlying mechanisms of Dracocephalum moldavica ethanol extract (DMEE) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory stimulation in RAW 264.7 macrophages along with septic mouse models. We found that DMEE suppressed the release of inflammatory mediators NO and PGE2 and inhibited both the mRNA and protein expression levels of iNOS and COX-2, respectively. In addition, DMEE reduced the release of proinflammatory cytokines, mainly IL-6 and IL-1ß, in RAW 264.7 cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK and p65. Furthermore, treatment with DMEE increased the survival rate and decreased the level of IL-6 in plasma in LPS-induced septic shock mice. Our findings suggest that DMEE elicits an anti-inflammatory effect in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and an anti-septic effect on septic mouse model through the inhibition of the ERK/JNK/NF-κB signaling cascades and production of IL-6.


Subject(s)
Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lamiaceae/chemistry , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Transcription Factor RelA/metabolism , Animals , Ethanol/chemistry , Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/metabolism , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/metabolism , MAP Kinase Kinase 4/metabolism , Male , Mice , Plant Extracts/chemistry , RAW 264.7 Cells
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24432, 2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585772

ABSTRACT

Despite the initial success of some drugs and vaccines targeting COVID-19, understanding the mechanism underlying SARS-CoV-2 disease pathogenesis remains crucial for the development of further approaches to treatment. Some patients with severe Covid-19 experience a cytokine storm and display evidence of inflammasome activation leading to increased levels of IL-1ß and IL-18; however, other reports have suggested reduced inflammatory responses to Sars-Cov-2. In this study we have examined the effects of the Sars-Cov-2 envelope (E) protein, a virulence factor in coronaviruses, on inflammasome activation and pulmonary inflammation. In cultured macrophages the E protein suppressed inflammasome priming and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Similarly, in mice transfected with E protein and treated with poly(I:C) to simulate the effects of viral RNA, the E protein, in an NLRP3-dependent fashion, reduced expression of pro-IL-1ß, levels of IL-1ß and IL-18 in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid, and macrophage infiltration in the lung. To simulate the effects of more advanced infection, macrophages were treated with both LPS and poly(I:C). In this setting the E protein increased NLRP3 inflammasome activation in both murine and human macrophages. Thus, the Sars-Cov-2 E protein may initially suppress the host NLRP3 inflammasome response to viral RNA while potentially increasing NLRP3 inflammasome responses in the later stages of infection. Targeting the Sars-Cov-2 E protein especially in the early stages of infection may represent a novel approach to Covid-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Humans , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/deficiency , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , Poly I-C/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
Nat Rev Immunol ; 20(10): 590-591, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550306
5.
Elife ; 102021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513055

ABSTRACT

Dendritic cells (DCs) regulate processes ranging from antitumor and antiviral immunity to host-microbe communication at mucosal surfaces. It remains difficult, however, to genetically manipulate human DCs, limiting our ability to probe how DCs elicit specific immune responses. Here, we develop a CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing method for human monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) that mediates knockouts with a median efficiency of >94% across >300 genes. Using this method, we perform genetic screens in moDCs, identifying mechanisms by which DCs tune responses to lipopolysaccharides from the human microbiome. In addition, we reveal donor-specific responses to lipopolysaccharides, underscoring the importance of assessing immune phenotypes in donor-derived cells, and identify candidate genes that control this specificity, highlighting the potential of our method to pinpoint determinants of inter-individual variation in immunity. Our work sets the stage for a systematic dissection of the immune signaling at the host-microbiome interface and for targeted engineering of DCs for neoantigen vaccination.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Associated Protein 9/genetics , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Gene Editing , Genomics , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron/immunology , CRISPR-Associated Protein 9/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/drug effects , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Phenotype , Signal Transduction , Toll-Like Receptor 4/agonists , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism
6.
J Immunol ; 207(9): 2310-2324, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497461

ABSTRACT

IFN-γ, a proinflammatory cytokine produced primarily by T cells and NK cells, activates macrophages and engages mechanisms to control pathogens. Although there is evidence of IFN-γ production by murine macrophages, IFN-γ production by normal human macrophages and their subsets remains unknown. Herein, we show that human M1 macrophages generated by IFN-γ and IL-12- and IL-18-stimulated monocyte-derived macrophages (M0) produce significant levels of IFN-γ. Further stimulation of IL-12/IL-18-primed macrophages or M1 macrophages with agonists for TLR-2, TLR-3, or TLR-4 significantly enhanced IFN-γ production in contrast to the similarly stimulated M0, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages. Similarly, M1 macrophages generated from COVID-19-infected patients' macrophages produced IFN-γ that was enhanced following LPS stimulation. The inhibition of M1 differentiation by Jak inhibitors reversed LPS-induced IFN-γ production, suggesting that differentiation with IFN-γ plays a key role in IFN-γ induction. We subsequently investigated the signaling pathway(s) responsible for TLR-4-induced IFN-γ production in M1 macrophages. Our results show that TLR-4-induced IFN-γ production is regulated by the ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) through the activation of PI3K, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2), and the JNK MAPK pathways. These results suggest that M1-derived IFN-γ may play a key role in inflammation that may be augmented following bacterial/viral infections. Moreover, blocking the mTORC1/2, PI3K, and JNK MAPKs in macrophages may be of potential translational significance in preventing macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Interferon-gamma/biosynthesis , Macrophages/drug effects , Poly I-C/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/immunology , Lipopolysaccharides/antagonists & inhibitors , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/immunology , Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa/antagonists & inhibitors , Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa/immunology , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/agonists
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480798

ABSTRACT

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a severe condition characterized by the systemic formation of microthrombi complicated with bleeding tendency and organ dysfunction. In the last years, it represents one of the most frequent consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The pathogenesis of DIC is complex, with cross-talk between the coagulant and inflammatory pathways. The objective of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory action of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide (um-PEA) in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced DIC model in rats. Experimental DIC was induced by continual infusion of LPS (30 mg/kg) for 4 h through the tail vein. Um-PEA (30 mg/kg) was given orally 30 min before and 1 h after the start of intravenous infusion of LPS. Results showed that um-PEA reduced alteration of coagulation markers, as well as proinflammatory cytokine release in plasma and lung samples, induced by LPS infusion. Furthermore, um-PEA also has the effect of preventing the formation of fibrin deposition and lung damage. Moreover, um-PEA was able to reduce the number of mast cells (MCs) and the release of its serine proteases, which are also necessary for SARS-CoV-2 infection. These results suggest that um-PEA could be considered as a potential therapeutic approach in the management of DIC and in clinical implications associated to coagulopathy and lung dysfunction, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amides/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Ethanolamines/therapeutic use , Palmitic Acids/therapeutic use , Sepsis/complications , Amides/chemistry , Amides/pharmacology , Animals , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Ethanolamines/chemistry , Ethanolamines/pharmacology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Mast Cells/cytology , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/metabolism , Palmitic Acids/chemistry , Palmitic Acids/pharmacology , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Prothrombin Time , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/pathology , Serine Proteases/metabolism
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470894

ABSTRACT

Infection caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) in many cases is accompanied by the release of a large amount of proinflammatory cytokines in an event known as "cytokine storm", which is associated with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases and high mortality. The excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines is linked, inter alia, to the enhanced activity of receptors capable of recognizing the conservative regions of pathogens and cell debris, namely TLRs, TREM-1 and TNFR1. Here we report that peptides derived from innate immunity protein Tag7 inhibit activation of TREM-1 and TNFR1 receptors during acute inflammation. Peptides from the N-terminal fragment of Tag7 bind only to TREM-1, while peptides from the C-terminal fragment interact solely with TNFR1. Selected peptides are capable of inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokines both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors and in vivo in the mouse model of acute lung injury (ALI) by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Treatment with peptides significantly decreases the infiltration of mononuclear cells to lungs in animals with DAD. Our findings suggest that Tag7-derived peptides might be beneficial in terms of the therapy or prevention of acute lung injury, e.g., for treating COVID-19 patients with severe pulmonary lesions.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Cytokines/chemistry , Peptides/metabolism , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/metabolism , Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Animals , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/pharmacology , Protein Binding , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/antagonists & inhibitors , Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1/antagonists & inhibitors
9.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 283: 114738, 2022 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466608

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Medicinal importance and potential activity of Siddha herbal formulations have proved over several centuries against a wide range of causative agents as Influenza, Dengue, Chikungunya, and Tuberculosis. The traditional medicine system of Siddha is a valuable therapeutic approach for treating viral respiratory infections like Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and can be effectively employed to target the host response and preventive care to boost the immune system. Kaba Sura Kudineer (KSK), an official polyherbal formulation has been used in Siddha traditional medicine for centuries. However, the role of KSK in regulating inflammation and the underlying molecular mechanisms has remained elusive. AIM OF THE STUDY: The goal of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of KSK using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Raw 264.7 murine macrophage cells were used for this study. The Inflammatory mediators and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The NF-κB nulcear translocation and protein expression of iNOS, COX-2 was analyzed with westernblot. RESULTS: KSK supplementation decreased LPS mediated TLR-4 production and secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines including IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2 and PGE-2. Moreover, it inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and thereby inhibited the expression of iNOS in the cell. The Western blot analysis further confirmed that KSK strongly prevented the LPS-induced degradation of IκB which is normally required for the activation of NF-κB and hereby suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB. The protein expression of iNOS, COX-2 was significantly decreased with the presence of KSK treatment. Results suggested that KSK manipulates its anti-inflammatory effects mainly through blocking the TLR mediated NF-κB signal transduction pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Together, this study has proven that KSK could be a potential therapeutic drug for alleviating excessive inflammation in many inflammation-associated diseases like COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Inflammation/drug therapy , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Macrophages/drug effects , Medicine, Ayurvedic , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Dietary Supplements , Mice , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Phytotherapy , Plant Preparations/pharmacology , RAW 264.7 Cells , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e922281, 2020 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453382

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a sudden and serious disease with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) is a novel target for inflammatory disease, and ibudilast (IBU), a PDE4 inhibitor, inhibits inflammatory response. Our study investigated the effect of IBU on the pathogenesis of neonatal ARDS and the underlying mechanism related to it. MATERIAL AND METHODS Western blotting was performed to analyze the expression levels of PDE4, CXCR4, SDF-1, CXCR5, CXCL1, inflammatory cytokines, and proteins related to cell apoptosis. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe the pathological morphology of lung tissue. Pulmonary edema score was used to assess the degree of lung water accumulation after pulmonary injury. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-alpha, IL-1ß, IL-6, and MCP-1) in serum. TUNEL assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. RESULTS Increased expression of PDE4 was observed in an LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model, and IBU ameliorated LPS-induced pathological manifestations and pulmonary edema in lung tissue. In addition, IBU attenuated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by inactivating the chemokine axis in the LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model. Finally, IBU significantly reduced LPS-induced cell apoptosis in lung tissue. CONCLUSIONS IBU, a PDE4 inhibitor, protected against ARDS by interfering with pulmonary inflammation and apoptosis. Our findings provide a novel and promising strategy to regulate pulmonary inflammation in ARDS.


Subject(s)
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4/metabolism , Inflammation/drug therapy , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyridines/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/drug therapy , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Apoptosis/drug effects , Apoptosis/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Injections, Intraperitoneal , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Mice , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/pathology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
11.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0254985, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The goal of this study was to determine if IL-22:Fc would Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: No therapies exist for ARDS and treatment is purely supportive. Interleukin-22 (IL-22) plays an integral component in recovery of the lung from infection. IL-22:Fc is a recombinant protein with a human FC immunoglobulin that increases the half-life of IL-22. STUDY DESIGN: ARDS was induced in C57BL/6 mice with intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at a dose of 33.3 or 100 ug. In the low-dose LPS group (LDG), IL-22:FC was administered via tail vein injection at 30 minutes (n = 9) and compared to sham (n = 9). In the high-dose LPS group (HDG), IL-22:FC was administered (n = 11) then compared to sham (n = 8). Euthanasia occurred after bronchioalveolar lavage (BAL) on post-injury day 4. RESULTS: In the LDG, IL-22:FC resulted in decreased protein leak (0.15 vs. 0.25 ug/uL, p = 0.02). BAL protein in animals receiving IL-22:Fc in the HDG was not different. For the HDG, animals receiving IL-22:Fc had lower BAL cell counts (539,636 vs 3,147,556 cells/uL, p = 0.02). For the HDG, IL-6 (110.6 vs. 527.1 pg/mL, p = 0.04), TNF-α (5.87 vs. 25.41 pg/mL, p = 0.04), and G-CSF (95.14 vs. 659.6, p = 0.01) levels were lower in the BAL fluid of IL-22:Fc treated animals compared to sham. CONCLUSIONS: IL-22:Fc decreases lung inflammation and lung capillary leak in ARDS. IL-22:Fc may be a novel therapy for ARDS.


Subject(s)
Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments/pharmacology , Interleukins/pharmacology , Lung Injury/drug therapy , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Female , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Lung Injury/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neutrophils/immunology , Pneumonia/pathology , Receptors, Interleukin/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Mucosa/pathology
12.
Acta Pharmacol Sin ; 42(11): 1913-1920, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437673

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is a dysregulated immune response to infection and potentially leads to life-threatening organ dysfunction, which is often seen in serious Covid-19 patients. Disulfiram (DSF), an old drug that has been used to treat alcohol addiction for decades, has recently been identified as a potent inhibitor of the gasdermin D (GSDMD)-induced pore formation that causes pyroptosis and inflammatory cytokine release. Therefore, DSF represents a promising therapeutic for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein with potent antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities that acts by neutralizing circulating endotoxins and activating cellular responses. In addition, LF has been well exploited as a drug nanocarrier and targeting ligands. In this study, we developed a DSF-LF nanoparticulate system (DSF-LF NP) for combining the immunosuppressive activities of both DSF and LF. DSF-LF NPs could effectively block pyroptosis and inflammatory cytokine release from macrophages. Treatment with DSF-LF NPs showed remarkable therapeutic effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. In addition, this therapeutic strategy was also applied to treat ulcerative colitis (UC), and substantial treatment efficacy was achieved in a murine colitis model. The underlying mode of action of these DSF-LF-NPs may contribute to efficiently suppressing macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and ameliorating the complications caused by sepsis and UC. As macrophage pyroptosis plays a pivotal role in inflammation, this safe and effective biomimetic nanomedicine may offer a versatile therapeutic strategy for treating various inflammatory diseases by repurposing DSF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis, Ulcerative , Disulfiram/pharmacokinetics , Lactoferrin , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Acetaldehyde Dehydrogenase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Biomimetic Materials/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Colitis, Ulcerative/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Disulfiram/pharmacology , Drug Carriers/pharmacology , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/pharmacology , Lactoferrin/metabolism , Lactoferrin/pharmacology , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use , Pyroptosis/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/metabolism , Treatment Outcome
13.
J Immunol ; 207(9): 2310-2324, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436143

ABSTRACT

IFN-γ, a proinflammatory cytokine produced primarily by T cells and NK cells, activates macrophages and engages mechanisms to control pathogens. Although there is evidence of IFN-γ production by murine macrophages, IFN-γ production by normal human macrophages and their subsets remains unknown. Herein, we show that human M1 macrophages generated by IFN-γ and IL-12- and IL-18-stimulated monocyte-derived macrophages (M0) produce significant levels of IFN-γ. Further stimulation of IL-12/IL-18-primed macrophages or M1 macrophages with agonists for TLR-2, TLR-3, or TLR-4 significantly enhanced IFN-γ production in contrast to the similarly stimulated M0, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages. Similarly, M1 macrophages generated from COVID-19-infected patients' macrophages produced IFN-γ that was enhanced following LPS stimulation. The inhibition of M1 differentiation by Jak inhibitors reversed LPS-induced IFN-γ production, suggesting that differentiation with IFN-γ plays a key role in IFN-γ induction. We subsequently investigated the signaling pathway(s) responsible for TLR-4-induced IFN-γ production in M1 macrophages. Our results show that TLR-4-induced IFN-γ production is regulated by the ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) through the activation of PI3K, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2), and the JNK MAPK pathways. These results suggest that M1-derived IFN-γ may play a key role in inflammation that may be augmented following bacterial/viral infections. Moreover, blocking the mTORC1/2, PI3K, and JNK MAPKs in macrophages may be of potential translational significance in preventing macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Interferon-gamma/biosynthesis , Macrophages/drug effects , Poly I-C/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/immunology , Lipopolysaccharides/antagonists & inhibitors , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/immunology , Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa/antagonists & inhibitors , Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa/immunology , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/agonists
14.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257615, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435618

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization (WHO) calls for the development of a rapid, biomarker-based, non-sputum test capable of detecting all forms of tuberculosis (TB) at the point-of-care to enable immediate treatment initiation. Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is the only WHO-endorsed TB biomarker that can be detected in urine, an easily collected sample matrix. For obtaining optimal sensitivity, we and others have shown that some form of sample pretreatment is necessary to remove background from patient urine samples. A number of systems are paper-based often destined for resource limited settings. Our current work presents incorporation of one such sample pretreatment, proteinase K (ProK) immobilized on paper (IPK) and test its performance in comparison to standard proteinase K (SPK) treatment that involves addition and deactivation at high temperature prior to performing a capture ELISA. Herein, a simple and economical method was developed for using ProK immobilized strips to pretreat urine samples. Simplification and cost reduction of the proposed pretreatment strip were achieved by using Whatman no.1 paper and by minimizing the concentration of ProK (an expensive but necessary reagent) used to pretreat the clinical samples prior to ELISA. To test the applicability of IPK, capture ELISA was carried out on either LAM-spiked urine or the clinical samples after pretreatment with ProK at 400 µg/mL for 30 minutes at room temperature. The optimal conditions and stability of the IPK were tested and validation was performed on a set of 25 previously analyzed archived clinical urine samples with known TB and HIV status. The results of IPK and SPK treated samples were in agreement showing that the urine LAM test currently under development has the potential to reach adult and pediatric patients regardless of HIV status or site of infection, and to facilitate global TB control to improve assay performance and ultimately treatment outcomes.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/urine , Endopeptidase K/metabolism , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Tuberculosis/diagnosis , Endopeptidase K/chemistry , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/instrumentation , Enzymes, Immobilized/chemistry , Enzymes, Immobilized/metabolism , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides/urine , Paper , Temperature
15.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 100: 108125, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401542

ABSTRACT

Mucosal barrier alterations may play a role in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including COVID-19. In this study we evaluate the association between bacterial translocation markers and systemic inflammation at the earliest time-point after hospitalization and at the last 72 h of hospitalization in survivors and non-survivors COVID-19 patients. Sixty-six SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR positive patients and nine non-COVID-19 pneumonia controls were admitted in this study. Blood samples were collected at hospital admission (T1) (Controls and COVID-19 patients) and 0-72 h before hospital discharge (T2, alive or dead) to analyze systemic cytokines and chemokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) concentrations and soluble CD14 (sCD14) levels. THP-1 human monocytic cell line was incubated with plasma from survivors and non-survivors COVID-19 patients and their phenotype, activation status, TLR4, and chemokine receptors were analyzed by flow cytometry. COVID-19 patients presented higher IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, TGF-ß1, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL4/MIP-1ß, and CCL5/RANTES levels than controls. Moreover, LPS and sCD14 were higher at hospital admission in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. Non-survivors COVID-19 patients had increased LPS levels concomitant with higher IL-6, TNF-α, CCL2/MCP-1, and CCL5/RANTES levels at T2. Increased expression of CD16 and CCR5 were identified in THP-1 cells incubated with the plasma of survivor patients obtained at T2. The incubation of THP-1 with T2 plasma of non-survivors COVID-19 leads to higher TLR4, CCR2, CCR5, CCR7, and CD69 expression. In conclusion, the coexistence of increased microbial translocation and hyperinflammation in patients with severe COVID-19 may lead to higher monocyte activation, which may be associated with worsening outcomes, such as death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Inflammation/etiology , Lipopolysaccharides/blood , Monocytes/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bacterial Translocation , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , THP-1 Cells
18.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374420

ABSTRACT

For the treatment of severe COVID-19, supplementation with human plasma-purified α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) to patients is currently considered. AAT inhibits host proteases that facilitate viral entry and possesses broad anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Researchers have demonstrated that an interaction between SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) enhances pro-inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we wanted to understand the potential anti-inflammatory activities of plasma-derived and recombinant AAT (recAAT) in a model of human total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to a combination of CHO expressed trimeric spike protein and LPS, ex vivo. We confirmed that cytokine production was enhanced in PBMCs within six hours when low levels of LPS were combined with purified spike proteins ("spike"). In the presence of 0.5 mg/mL recAAT, however, LPS/spike-induced TNF-α and IL-1ß mRNA expression and protein release were significantly inhibited (by about 46-50%) relative to LPS/spike alone. Although without statistical significance, recAAT also reduced production of IL-6 and IL-8. Notably, under the same experimental conditions, the plasma-derived AAT preparation Respreeza (used in native and oxidized forms) did not show significant effects. Our findings imply that an early pro-inflammatory activation of human PBMCs is better controlled by the recombinant version of AAT than the human plasma-derived AAT used here. Considering the increasing clinical interest in AAT therapy as useful to ameliorate the hyper-inflammation seen during COVID-19 infection, different AAT preparations require careful evaluation.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/immunology , CHO Cells , COVID-19/therapy , Cells, Cultured , Cricetulus , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/chemistry , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/immunology
19.
Phytomedicine ; 92: 153729, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373222

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Inflammation-mediated lung injury is a major cause of health problems in many countries and has been the leading cause of morbidity/mortality in intensive care units. In the current COVID-19 pandemic, the majority of the patients experienced serious pneumonia resulting from inflammation (Acute respiratory distress syndrome/ARDS). Pathogenic infections cause cytokine release syndrome (CRS) by hyperactivation of immune cells, which in turn release excessive cytokines causing ARDS. Currently, there are no standard therapies for viral, bacterial or pathogen-mediated CRS. PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate and validate the protective effects of Dehydrozingerone (DHZ) against LPS induced lung cell injury by in-vitro and in-vivo models and to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate these therapeutic effects. METHODS: The therapeutic activity of DHZ was determined in in-vitro models by pre-treating the cells with DHZ and exposed to LPS to stimulate the inflammatory cascade of events. We analysed the effect of DHZ on LPS induced inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and cell damage markers expression/levels using various cell lines. We performed gene expression, ELISA, and western blot analysis to elucidate the effect of DHZ on inflammation and its modulation of MAPK and NF-κB pathways. Further, the prophylactic and therapeutic effect of DHZ was evaluated against the LPS induced ARDS model in rats. RESULTS: DHZ significantly (p < 0.01) attenuated the LPS induced ROS, inflammatory cytokine, chemokine gene expression and protein release in macrophages. Similarly, DHZ treatment protected the lung epithelial and endothelial cells by mitigating the LPS induced inflammatory events in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo analysis showed that DHZ treatment significantly (p < 0.001) mitigated the LPS induced ARDS pathophysiology of increase in the inflammatory cells in BALF, inflammatory cytokine and chemokines in lung tissues. LPS stimulated neutrophil-mediated events, apoptosis, alveolar wall thickening and alveolar inflammation were profoundly reduced by DHZ treatment in a rat model. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates for the first time that DHZ has the potential to ameliorate LPS induced ARDS by inhibiting cytokine storm and oxidative through modulating the MAPK and NF-κB pathways. This data provides pre-clinical support to develop DHZ as a potential therapeutic agent against ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Animals , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides , Lung/metabolism , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Oxidative Stress , Pandemics , Rats , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Styrenes
20.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(13): 3305-3319, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372133

ABSTRACT

An inflammatory cytokine storm is considered an important cause of death in severely and critically ill COVID-19 patients, however, the relationship between the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein and the host's inflammatory cytokine storm is not clear. Here, the qPCR results indicated that S protein induced a significantly elevated expression of multiple inflammatory factor mRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), whereas RS-5645 ((4-(thiophen-3-yl)-1-(p-tolyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-yl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone) attenuated the expression of the most inflammatory factor mRNAs. RS-5645 also significantly reduced the cellular ratios of CD45+/IFNγ+, CD3+/IFNγ+, CD11b+/IFNγ+, and CD56+/IFNγ+ in human PBMCs. In addition, RS-5645 effectively inhibited the activation of inflammatory cells and reduced inflammatory damage to lung tissue in mice. Sequencing results of 16S rRNA v3+v4 in mouse alveolar lavage fluid showed that there were 494 OTUs overlapping between the alveolar lavage fluid of mice that underwent S protein+ LPS-combined intervention (M) and RS-5645-treated mice (R), while R manifested 64 unique OTUs and M exhibited 610 unique OTUs. In the alveoli of group R mice, the relative abundances of microorganisms belonging to Porphyromonas, Rothia, Streptococcus, and Neisseria increased significantly, while the relative abundances of microorganisms belonging to Psychrobacter, Shimia, and Sporosarcina were significantly diminished. The results of KEGG analysis indicated that the alveolar microbiota of mice in the R group can increase translation and reduce the activity of amino acid metabolism pathways. COG analysis results indicated that the abundance of proteins involved in ribosomal structure and biogenesis related to metabolism was augmented in the alveolar microbiota of the mice in the R group, while the abundance of proteins involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis was significantly reduced. Therefore, our research results showed that RS-5645 attenuated pulmonary inflammatory cell infiltration and the inflammatory storm induced by the S protein and LPS by modulating the pulmonary microbiota.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Lung/microbiology , Microbiota/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Animals , Antigens, CD/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C
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