Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 23
Filter
1.
Front Public Health ; 9: 742355, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775899

ABSTRACT

Objective: Health disparities related to basic medical insurance in China have not been sufficiently examined, particularly among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aims to investigate the disparities in HCC survival by insurance status in Tianjin, China. Methods: This retrospective analysis used data from the Tianjin Basic Medical Insurance claims database, which consists of enrollees covered by Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) and Urban and Rural Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URRBMI). Adult patients newly diagnosed with HCC between 2011 and 2016 were identified and followed until death from any cause, withdrawal from UEBMI or URRBMI, or the latest data in the dataset (censoring as of December 31st 2017), whichever occurred first. Patients' overall survival during the follow-up was assessed using Kaplan-Meier and extrapolated by six parametric models. The hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated with the adjusted Cox proportional hazards model including age at diagnosis, sex, baseline comorbidities and complications, baseline healthcare resources utilization and medical costs, tumor metastasis at diagnosis, the initial treatment after diagnosis and antiviral therapy during the follow-up. Results: Two thousand sixty eight patients covered by UEBMI (N = 1,468) and URRBMI (N = 570) were included (mean age: 60.6 vs. 60.9, p = 0.667; female: 31.8 vs. 27.7%, p = 0.074). The median survival time for patients within the UEBMI and URRBMI were 37.8 and 12.2 months, and the 1-, 3-, 5-, 10-year overall survival rates were 63.8, 50.2, 51.0, 33.4, and 44.4, 22.8, 31.5, 13.1%, respectively. Compared with UEBMI, patients covered by URRBMI had 72% (HR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.47-2.00) higher risk of death after adjustments for measured confounders above. The survival difference was still statistically significant (HR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.21-1.83) in sensitivity analysis based on propensity score matching. Conclusions: This study reveals that HCC patients covered by URRBMI may have worse survival than patients covered by UEBMI. Further efforts are warranted to understand healthcare disparities for patients covered by different basic medical insurance in China.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Health Status Disparities , Liver Neoplasms , Adult , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Insurance Coverage , Insurance, Health , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Urban Population
2.
Hepatol Commun ; 6(1): 223-236, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597246

ABSTRACT

Prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) could be affected by lack of or delayed therapy. We aimed to characterize the prevalence, correlates, and clinical impact of therapeutic underuse and delay in patients with HCC. Patients with HCC diagnosed between 2010 and 2017 were analyzed from the United States National Cancer Database. Logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with no and delayed (>90 days after diagnosis) HCC treatment. Cox proportional hazards regression with landmark analysis assessed the association between therapeutic delay and overall survival (OS), accounting for immortal time bias. Of 116,299 patients with HCC, 24.2% received no treatment and 18.4% of treated patients had delayed treatment. Older age, Black, Hispanic, lower socioeconomic status, earlier year of diagnosis, treatment at nonacademic centers, Northeast region, increased medical comorbidity, worse liver dysfunction, and higher tumor burden were associated with no treatment. Among treated patients, younger age, Hispanic, Black, treatment at academic centers, West region, earlier tumor stage, and receipt of noncurative treatment were associated with treatment delays. In multivariable Cox regression with a landmark of 150 days, patients with and without treatment delays had similar OS (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-1.04) with a median survival of 33.7 vs. 32.1 months, respectively. However, therapeutic delay was associated with worse OS in patients who had tumor, nodes, and metastases (TNM) stage 1 (aHR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.11) or received curative treatment (aHR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05-1.18). Conclusion: One-fourth of patients with HCC receive no therapy and one-fifth of treated patients experience treatment delays. Both were associated with demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical characteristics of patients as well as facility type and region. The association between therapeutic delay and survival was stage and treatment dependent.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Age of Onset , Aged , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/ethnology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality , Female , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Insurance Coverage , Insurance, Health , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/ethnology , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Social Class , Tumor Burden , United States/epidemiology
3.
Cancer Med ; 10(23): 8432-8450, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The existing evidence has indicated that hyperthermia ablation (HA) and HA combined with transarterial chemoembolization (HATACE) are the optimal alternative to surgical resection for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the COVID-19 crisis. However, the evidence for decision-making is lacking in terms of comparison between HA and HATACE. Herein, a comprehensive evaluation was performed to compare the efficacy and safety of HATACE with monotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Worldwide studies were collected to evaluate the HATACE regimen for HCC due to the practical need for global extrapolation of applicative population. Meta-analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 software (The Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, Denmark). RESULTS: Thirty-six studies involving a large sample of 5036 patients were included finally. Compared with HA alone, HATACE produced the advantage of 5-year overall survival (OS) rate (OR:1.90; 95%CI:1.46,2.46; p < 0.05) without increasing toxicity (p ≥ 0.05). Compared with TACE alone, HATACE was associated with superior 5-year OS rate (OR:3.54; 95%CI:1.96,6.37; p < 0.05) and significantly reduced the incidences of severe liver damage (OR:0.32; 95%CI:0.11,0.96; p < 0.05) and ascites (OR:0.42; 95%CI:0.20,0.88; p < 0.05). Subgroup analysis results of small (≤3 cm) HCC revealed that there were no significant differences between the HATACE group and HA monotherapy group in regard to the OS rates (p ≥ 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with TACE alone, HATACE was more effective and safe for HCC. Compared with HA alone, HATACE was more effective for non-small-sized (>3 cm) HCC with comparable safety. However, the survival benefit of adjuvant TACE in HATACE regimen was not found for the patients with small (≤3 cm) HCC.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Chemoembolization, Therapeutic/methods , Hyperthermia, Induced/methods , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality , Combined Modality Therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
4.
Clin Imaging ; 76: 123-129, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454081

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Thermal ablation (TA) and transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) may be used alone or in combination (TACE+TA) for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of our study was to compare the time to tumor progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) for patients who received TA alone or TACE+TA for HCC tumors under 3 cm. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This HIPAA-compliant IRB-approved retrospective analysis included 85 therapy-naïve patients from 2010 to 2018 (63 males, 22 females, mean age 62.4 ± 8.5 years) who underwent either TA alone (n = 64) or TA in combination with drug-eluting beads (DEB)-TACE (n = 18) or Lipiodol-TACE (n = 3) for locoregional therapy of early stage HCC with maximum tumor diameter under 3 cm. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed using the log-rank test to assess TTP and OS. RESULTS: All TA and TACE+TA treatments included were technically successful. TTP was 23.0 months in the TA group and 22.0 months in the TACE+TA group. There was no statistically significant difference in TTP (p = 0.64). Median OS was 69.7 months in the TA group and 64.6 months in the TACE+TA group. There was no statistically significant difference in OS (p = 0.14). The treatment cohorts had differences in AFP levels (p = 0.03) and BCLC stage (p = 0.047). Complication rates between patient groups were similar (p = 0.61). CONCLUSION: For patients with HCC under 3 cm, TA alone and TACE+TA have similar outcomes in terms of TTP and OS, suggesting that TACE+TA may not be needed for these tumors unless warranted by tumor location or other technical consideration.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Chemoembolization, Therapeutic , Liver Neoplasms , Aged , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnostic imaging , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Combined Modality Therapy , Female , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
6.
HPB (Oxford) ; 24(3): 342-352, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360060

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the work status of clinicians in China and their management strategy alteration for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A nationwide online questionnaire survey was conducted in 42 class-A tertiary hospitals across China. Experienced clinicians of HCC-related specialties responded with their work status and management suggestions for HCC patients during the pandemic. RESULTS: 716 doctors responded effectively with a response rate of 60.1%, and 664 were included in the final analysis. Overall, 51.4% (341/664) of clinicians reported more than a 60% reduction of the regular workload and surgeons declared the highest proportion of workload reduction. 92.5% (614/664) of the respondents have been using online medical consultation to substitute for the "face-to-face" visits. Adaptive adjustment for the treatment strategy for HCC was made, including the recommendations of noninvasive and minimally invasive treatments such as transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for early and intermediate stage. Targeted therapy has been the mainstay for advanced stage and also as a bridge therapy for resectable HCC. DISCUSSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, online medical consultation is recommended to avoid social contact. Targeted therapy as a bridge therapy is recommended for resectable HCC considering the possibility of delayed surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Chemoembolization, Therapeutic , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(8): 1520-1530, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317650

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is expected to have a long-lasting impact on the approach to care for patients at risk for and with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to the risks from potential exposure and resource reallocation. The goal of this document is to provide recommendations on HCC surveillance and monitoring, including strategies to limit unnecessary exposure while continuing to provide high-quality care for patients. Publications and guidelines pertaining to the management of HCC during COVID-19 were reviewed for recommendations related to surveillance and monitoring practices, and any available guidance was referenced to support the authors' recommendations when applicable. Existing HCC risk stratification models should be utilized to prioritize imaging resources to those patients at highest risk of incident HCC and recurrence following therapy though surveillance can likely continue as before in settings where COVID-19 prevalence is low and adequate protections are in place. Waitlisted patients who will benefit from urgent LT should be prioritized for surveillance whereas it would be reasonable to extend surveillance interval by a short period in HCC patients with lower risk tumor features and those more than 2 years since their last treatment. For patients eligible for systemic therapy, the treatment regimen should be dictated by the risk of COVID-19 associated with route of administration, monitoring and treatment of adverse events, within the context of relative treatment efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , alpha-Fetoproteins
8.
Mol Immunol ; 137: 221-227, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313337

ABSTRACT

Natural Killer (NK) cells are considered the first line of defense against viral infections and tumors. Several factors affect NK cytotoxic activity rendering it dysfunctional and thereby impeding the ability to scavenge abnormal cells as a part of immune escaping mechanisms induced by different types of cancers. NK cells play a crucial role augmenting the activity of various types of anticancer mAb since dysfunctional NK cells are the main reason for the low response to these therapies. To this light, we examined the phenotypic characters of the circulating NK cells isolated from HCC patients compared to healthy controls. Then, dysfunctional NK cells, from HCC patients, were reactivated with cytokines cocktail and their cytotoxic activity with the anti-EGFR mAb "cetuximab" was investigated. This showed a downregulation of patients NK cells activating receptors (NKP30, NKP46, NKG2D and CD16) as well as CD56 and up-regulation of NKG2A inhibitory receptor. We also reported an increase in aberrant CD56- NK cells subset in peripheral blood of HCC patients compared to healthy controls. Thus, confirming the dysfunctionality of peripheral NK cells isolated from HCC patients. Cytokines re-activation of those NK cells lead to upregulation of NK activating receptors and downregulation of inhibitory receptor. Moreover, the percentage of aberrant CD56- NK cells subset was reduced. Here, we proved that advanced HCC patients have an increased percentage of more immature and noncytotoxic NK cell subsets in their peripheral blood, which might account for the low cytotoxicity noticed in those patients. A significant improvement in the cytotoxicity against HCC was noticed upon using reactivated NK cells combined with cetuximab. Therefore, this study highlights the potential recruitment of NK immune cells along with cetuximab to enhance cytotoxicity against HCC.


Subject(s)
Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Cetuximab/therapeutic use , Cytokines/pharmacology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , CD56 Antigen/metabolism , Cell Line, Tumor , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily C/metabolism
9.
World J Gastroenterol ; 27(25): 3780-3789, 2021 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302602

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted hospital organization, with the necessity to quickly react to face the pandemic. The management of the oncological patient has been modified by necessity due to different allocation of nurses and doctors, requiring new strategies to guarantee the correct assistance to the patients. Hepatocellular carcinoma, considered as one of the most aggressive types of liver cancer, has also required a different management during this period in order to optimize the management of patients at risk for and with this cancer. The aim of this document is to review recommendations on hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance and management, including surgery, liver transplantation, interventional radiology, oncology, and radiotherapy. Publications and guidelines from the main scientific societies worldwide regarding the management of hepatocellular carcinoma during the COVID-19 pandemic were reviewed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Transpl Immunol ; 68: 101435, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294281

ABSTRACT

Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a rare complication after liver transplantation that characterized by high mortality. We presented a case of aGVHD after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The patient suffered from fever, oral ulcer, rashes and diarrhea and had a co-infection with Cytomegalovirus (CMV). Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis for cluster of differentiation (CD3) cells and skin biopsy indicated aGVHD. His regimens included high dose of steroids, ruxolitinib, basiliximab, local liver radiotherapy and antibiotics prophylaxis, with the withdrawal of tacrolimus and MMF. Unfortunately, he developed an acute rejection followed by cytomegalovirus infection and lung infection. Soon afterwards he was sent to "isolation ward" due to high suspicion for clinical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Fortunately, He was excluded from COVID-19 after nucleic acid and antibody tests. Though closely contact with other COVID-19 patients for a month, the patient was not affected with COVID-19 through his careful protective measures. Finally, the patient recovered after antiviral and antifungal treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient recovered from aGVHD as a close contact.


Subject(s)
Antifungal Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Cytomegalovirus Infections , Cytomegalovirus , Graft vs Host Disease/drug therapy , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Liver Transplantation , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , Cytomegalovirus Infections/drug therapy , Graft vs Host Disease/diagnosis , Graft vs Host Disease/etiology , Graft vs Host Disease/virology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
11.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw ; 19(9): 1063-1071, 2021 05 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256975

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Delays in diagnosis and treatment have been reported for many cancers, with resultant stage migration and worse survival; however, few data exist in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These data are of particular importance in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has caused disruptions in healthcare processes and may continue to impact cancer care for the foreseeable future. The aim of our study was to characterize the prevalence and clinical significance of diagnostic and treatment delays in patients with HCC. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients diagnosed with HCC between January 2008 and July 2017 at 2 US health systems. Diagnostic and treatment delays were defined as >90 days between presentation and HCC diagnosis and between diagnosis and treatment, respectively. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with diagnostic and treatment delays and Cox proportional hazard models to identify correlates of overall survival. RESULTS: Of 925 patients with HCC, 39.0% were diagnosed via screening, 33.1% incidentally, and 27.9% symptomatically. Median time from presentation to diagnosis was 37 days (interquartile range, 18-94 days), with 120 patients (13.0%) experiencing diagnostic delays. Median time from HCC diagnosis to treatment was 46 days (interquartile range, 29-74 days), with 17.2% of patients experiencing treatment delays. Most (72.5%) diagnostic delays were related to provider-level factors (eg, monitoring indeterminate nodules), whereas nearly half (46.2%) of treatment delays were related to patient-related factors (eg, missed appointments). In multivariable analyses, treatment delays were not associated with increased mortality (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.60-1.35); these results were consistent across subgroup analyses by Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage and treatment modality. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostic and therapeutic delays exceeding 3 months are common in patients with HCC; however, observed treatment delays do not seem to significantly impact overall survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Hepatol Commun ; 5(10): 1660-1675, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233191

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic necessitated down-scaling of in-hospital care to prohibit the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2. We (1) assessed patient perceptions on quality of care by telesurvey (cohort 1) and written questionnaire (cohort 2), and (2) analyzed trends in elective and nonelective admissions before (December 2019 to February 2020) and during (March to May 2020) the COVID-19 pandemic in Austria. A total of 279 outpatients were recruited into cohort 1 and 138 patients into cohort 2. All admissions from December 2019 to May 2020 to the Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology at the Vienna General Hospital were analyzed. A total of 32.6% (n = 91 of 279) of cohort 1 and 72.5% (n = 95 of 131) of cohort 2 had telemedical contact, whereas 59.5% (n = 166 of 279) and 68.2% (n = 90 of 132) had face-to-face visits. A total of 24.1% (n = 32 of 133) needed acute medical help during health care restrictions; however, 57.3% (n = 51 of 89) reported that contacting their physician during COVID-19 was difficult or impossible. Patient-reported satisfaction with treatment decreased significantly during restrictions in cohort 1 (visual analog scale [VAS] 0-10: 9.0 ± 1.6 to 8.6 ± 2.2; P < 0.001) and insignificantly in cohort 2 (VAS 0-10: 8.9 ± 1.6 to 8.7 ± 2.1; P = 0.182). Despite fewer hospital admissions during COVID-19, the proportion of nonelective admissions (+6.3%) and intensive care unit admissions (+6.7%) increased. Patients with cirrhosis with nonelective admissions during COVID-19 had significantly higher Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) (25.5 [14.2] vs. 17.0 [interquartile range: 8.8]; P = 0.003) and ΔMELD (difference from last MELD: 3.9 ± 6.3 vs. 8.7 ± 6.4; P = 0.008), required immediate intensive care more frequently (26.7% vs. 5.6%; P = 0.034), and had significantly increased 30-day liver-related mortality (30.0% vs. 8.3%; P = 0.028). Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic's effects on quality of liver care is evident from decreased patient satisfaction, hospitalization of sicker patients with advanced chronic liver disease, and increased liver-related mortality. Strategies for improved telemedical liver care and preemptive treatment of cirrhosis-related complications are needed to counteract the COVID-19-associated restrictions of in-hospital care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastroenterology , Liver Diseases/therapy , Patient Satisfaction , Quality of Health Care , Telemedicine , Aged , Austria , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Chronic Disease , Delivery of Health Care , End Stage Liver Disease , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Liver Diseases/mortality , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Liver Transplantation , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Nat Rev Dis Primers ; 7(1): 6, 2021 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1075224

ABSTRACT

Liver cancer remains a global health challenge, with an estimated incidence of >1 million cases by 2025. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer and accounts for ~90% of cases. Infection by hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus are the main risk factors for HCC development, although non-alcoholic steatohepatitis associated with metabolic syndrome or diabetes mellitus is becoming a more frequent risk factor in the West. Moreover, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-associated HCC has a unique molecular pathogenesis. Approximately 25% of all HCCs present with potentially actionable mutations, which are yet to be translated into the clinical practice. Diagnosis based upon non-invasive criteria is currently challenged by the need for molecular information that requires tissue or liquid biopsies. The current major advancements have impacted the management of patients with advanced HCC. Six systemic therapies have been approved based on phase III trials (atezolizumab plus bevacizumab, sorafenib, lenvatinib, regorafenib, cabozantinib and ramucirumab) and three additional therapies have obtained accelerated FDA approval owing to evidence of efficacy. New trials are exploring combination therapies, including checkpoint inhibitors and tyrosine kinase inhibitors or anti-VEGF therapies, or even combinations of two immunotherapy regimens. The outcomes of these trials are expected to change the landscape of HCC management at all evolutionary stages.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/etiology , Combined Modality Therapy , Humans , Immunotherapy , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Sorafenib
15.
Hepatol Int ; 14(6): 920-929, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919762

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has been giving the devastating impact on the current medical care system. There are quite many guidelines on COVID-19, but only a few on the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during COVID-19 pandemic. AIMS: We develop these recommendations to preserve adequate clinical practice for the management of HCC. METHODS: Experts of HCC in the Asia-Pacific region exchanged opinions via webinar, and these recommendations were formed. RESULTS: Close contact should be minimized to reduce possible exposure of both medical staff and patients to the novel coronavirus. To prevent transmission of the virus, meticulous hygiene measures are important. With the decrease in regular medical service, the medical staff may be mobilized to provide COVID-19-related patient care. However, diagnosis and treatment of HCC should not be delayed because of COVID-19 pandemic. The management of HCC should be the same as in non-pandemic circumstances. HCC is highly malignant, thus it is recommended not to delay curative treatment such as surgery and ablation. However, a kind of triage is necessary even among patients with HCC when resources are insufficient for all to be treated. Curative treatments should be periodized and cytoreductive or non-curative treatment such as vascular interventions and systemic therapy may be postponed until it can be performed safely with sufficient resources. For patients with confirmed or suspected to be infected with the novel coronavirus, diagnosis and treatment should be postponed until the virus is eliminated or they are confirmed as not being infected with it. CONCLUSIONS: These are collection of measures implemented by front-line medical professionals. We would evolve these recommendations over time as more real-world data becomes available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/complications , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/complications
16.
Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 5(8): 765-775, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692971

ABSTRACT

Around the world, recommendations for cancer treatment are being adapted in real time in response to the pandemic of COVID-19. We, as a multidisciplinary team, reviewed the standard management options, according to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification system, for hepatocellular carcinoma. We propose treatment recommendations related to COVID-19 for the different stages of hepatocellular carcinoma (ie, 0, A, B, and C), specifically in relation to surgery, locoregional therapies, and systemic therapy. We suggest potential strategies to modify risk during the pandemic and aid multidisciplinary treatment decision making. We also review the multidisciplinary management of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma as a potentially curable and incurable diagnosis in the setting of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Bile Duct Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/pathology , Cholangiocarcinoma/therapy , Clinical Decision-Making , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Patient Care Team , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Dig Liver Dis ; 52(9): 937-941, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641652

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic had a huge impact on national and regional health systems. The impact of SARS-CoV-2 on the quality of care for patients with liver disease is still unknown. AIMS: The Italian Association for the Study of the Liver (AISF) conducted a survey to assess the impact of SARS-CoV-2 on hepatology units activities in Italy. METHODS: A prospective web-based survey was proposed to all AISF active members. The survey was available online from April 8 2020, to May 3 2020, (lockdown phase in Italy). RESULTS: 194 AISF members answered the questionnaire, most of whom were specialists in Gastroenterology (41%) or Internal Medicine (28%), and worked in Northern Italy (51%). 26% of hepatology wards had been converted into COVID-19 wards, and 33% had bed reductions. All hepatological activities, including the management of patients with decompensated liver disease, liver transplant and HCC had been significantly reduced/stopped. The number of physicians answering that their practices had not been modified ranged between 0.6% (for chronic hepatitis) to 47% (for the execution of paracentesis). The recorded answers were consistent among different regions, and did not show any north-south gradient CONCLUSION: COVID-19 outbreak significantly impacted on hepatological clinical activity. This survey can serve as a basis to compare the impact of future measures aimed at delivering an acceptable level of liver care during a national pandemic or crisis.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Gastroenterology/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Liver Diseases/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Chronic Disease , Esophageal and Gastric Varices/diagnosis , Esophageal and Gastric Varices/surgery , Hepatitis B, Chronic/drug therapy , Hepatitis C, Chronic/drug therapy , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis/therapy , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Liver Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening , Pandemics , Paracentesis/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Ann Saudi Med ; 40(4): 273-280, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612198

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a novel coronavirus was identified in patients in Wuhan, China. The virus, subsequently named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, spread worldwide and the disease (coronavirus disease 2019 or COVID-19) was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020. Older adults and individuals with comorbidities have been reported as being more vulnerable to COVID-19. Patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) have compromised immune function due to cirrhosis and are more susceptible to infection. However, it is unclear if patients with CLD are more vulnerable to COVID-19 and its complications than other populations. The high number of severe cases of COVID-19 has placed an unusual burden on health systems, compromising their capacity to provide the regular care that patients with CLD require. Hence, it is incredibly crucial at this juncture to provide a set of interim recommendations on the management of patients with CLD during the current COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Amides/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azetidines/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Biopsy/methods , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Drug Combinations , Drug Interactions , Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/epidemiology , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/therapy , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/epidemiology , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/therapy , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis/therapy , Liver Diseases/therapy , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Liver Transplantation , Lopinavir/adverse effects , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/epidemiology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Purines , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Pyrazoles , Ritonavir/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Ultrasonography/methods
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL