Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Cell Rep ; 36(7): 109530, 2021 08 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330686

ABSTRACT

A recent study proposed that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) hijacks the LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposition machinery to integrate into the DNA of infected cells. If confirmed, this finding could have significant clinical implications. Here, we apply deep (>50×) long-read Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) sequencing to HEK293T cells infected with SARS-CoV-2 and do not find the virus integrated into the genome. By examining ONT data from separate HEK293T cultivars, we completely resolve 78 L1 insertions arising in vitro in the absence of L1 overexpression systems. ONT sequencing applied to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-positive liver cancer tissues located a single HBV insertion. These experiments demonstrate reliable resolution of retrotransposon and exogenous virus insertions by ONT sequencing. That we find no evidence of SARS-CoV-2 integration suggests that such events are, at most, extremely rare in vivo and therefore are unlikely to drive oncogenesis or explain post-recovery detection of the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , DNA, Viral/genetics , Genome, Human , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Virus Integration , Aged , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Hepatitis B virus/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/virology , Long Interspersed Nucleotide Elements , Male , Nanopore Sequencing , Vero Cells
2.
Curr Oncol ; 27(5): e501-e511, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024675

ABSTRACT

Objective: We aimed to review data about delaying strategies for the management of hepatobiliary cancers requiring surgery during the covid-19 pandemic. Background: Given the covid-19 pandemic, many jurisdictions, to spare resources, have limited access to operating rooms for elective surgical activity, including cancer, thus forcing deferral or cancellation of cancer surgeries. Surgery for hepatobiliary cancer is high-risk and particularly resource-intensive. Surgeons must critically appraise which patients will benefit most from surgery and which ones have other therapeutic options to delay surgery. Little guidance is currently available about potential delaying strategies for hepatobiliary cancers when surgery is not possible. Methods: An international multidisciplinary panel reviewed the available literature to summarize data relating to standard-of-care surgical management and possible mitigating strategies to be used as a bridge to surgery for colorectal liver metastases, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallbladder cancer, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Results: Outcomes of surgery during the covid-19 pandemic are reviewed. Resource requirements are summarized, including logistics and adverse effects profiles for hepatectomy and delaying strategies using systemic, percutaneous and radiation ablative, and liver embolic therapies. For each cancer type, the long-term oncologic outcomes of hepatectomy and the clinical tools that can be used to prognosticate for individual patients are detailed. Conclusions: There are a variety of delaying strategies to consider if availability of operating rooms decreases. This review summarizes available data to provide guidance about possible delaying strategies depending on patient, resource, institution, and systems factors. Multidisciplinary team discussions should be leveraged to consider patient- and tumour-specific information for each individual case.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hepatectomy/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/methods , Liver Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Surgeons/standards , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
DNA Cell Biol ; 40(2): 359-372, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963006

ABSTRACT

The impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is the virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has been confirmed in cancers through binding specific mRNAs to invade human cells. Therefore, the aim of this study described here was to develop and validate novel SARS-CoV-2 proteins binding human mRNAs (SPBRs) signature to predict overall survival (OS) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using multivariate Cox regression analysis, a set of SPBRs was identified to establish a multigene signature in the Cancer Genome Atlas repositories cohort. Furthermore, a nomogram was established based on the signature and clinical risk factors to improve risk stratification for individual patients. External validation was performed in the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) cohort. A six-SPBR signature was built to classify patients into two risk groups using a risk score with different OS in two cohorts (all p < 0.0001). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated the signature was an independent predictor of HCC. Moreover, the signature presented an excellent diagnostic power in differentiating HCC and normal tissues. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that high-risk group was closely enriched in cell cycle, DNA replication, microRNAs in cancer, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. The novel signature demonstrated great clinical value in predicting the OS for patients with HCC, and will provide a good reference between cancer research and SARS-CoV-2 and help individualized treatment in HCC.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , COVID-19/complications , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Nomograms , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/virology , Cohort Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Survival Rate
5.
Mol Biol Rep ; 47(6): 4383-4392, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260333

ABSTRACT

The ACE2 gene is a receptor of SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) for COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). To analyze the expression profiles and clinical significances for this gene in humans, RNA-seq data representing 27 different tissues were analyzed using NCBI; total RNA was extracted from different tissues of mouse and semi-quantitative reverse transcriptional-polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR) was carried out. Immunohistochemistry expression profiles in normal tissues and cancer tissues and TCGA survival analysis in renal and liver cancer were conducted. ACE2 was highly conserved in different species. In normal tissues, ACE2 expression distributions were organ-specific, mainly in the kidney, male testis and female breast, and cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. High level of expression in testis, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal system indicated that SARS-CoV-2 might not only attack the lungs, but also affect other organs, particularly the testes, thus it may severely damage male sexual development for younger male and lead to infertility in an adult male, if he contracted COVID-19. On the other side, high expression of ACE2 was correlated with increased survival rate in renal and liver cancer, indicating that ACE2 is a prognostic marker in both renal cancer and liver cancers. Thus, the ACE2 is a functional receptor for SARS-CoV-2 and has a potential anti-tumor role in cancer. Taken together, this study may not only provide potential clues for further medical pathogenesis of COVID-19 and male fertility, but also indicate the clinical significance of the role of the ACE2 gene in cancer.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Kidney Neoplasms/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Databases, Genetic , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Kidney/metabolism , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Kidney Neoplasms/virology , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Liver Neoplasms/pathology , Liver Neoplasms/virology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Mammary Glands, Human/metabolism , Mammary Glands, Human/pathology , Mammary Glands, Human/virology , Mice , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Survival Analysis , Testis/metabolism , Testis/pathology , Testis/virology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...