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1.
Front Public Health ; 9: 778340, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595542

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has spread worldwide, and the WHO declared it a pandemic on March 11, 2020. Clinical characteristics and epidemiology features of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 have been explored in the previous study. However, little is known about the combinative association of liver dysfunction and abnormal interleukins (ILs) in severe patients with COVID-19. This study was designed to estimate whether liver dysfunction and abnormal ILs could predict the severity of COVID-19. This study integrated liver function data and ILs data in patients with COVID-19 and found that liver injury and two ILs, interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), were closely related to the prognosis of patients with COVID-19. This study may give more exact information to clinicians about the prognosis of patients with COVID-19. In addition, this correlational study between liver disorder and ILs may provide a new vision to diagnosis and treatment in patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interleukin-6 , Liver/pathology , Receptors, Interleukin-2/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Pandemics
2.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572667

ABSTRACT

Pre-existing comorbidities such as obesity or metabolic diseases can adversely affect the clinical outcome of COVID-19. Chronic metabolic disorders are globally on the rise and often a consequence of an unhealthy diet, referred to as a Western Diet. For the first time in the Syrian hamster model, we demonstrate the detrimental impact of a continuous high-fat high-sugar diet on COVID-19 outcome. We observed increased weight loss and lung pathology, such as exudate, vasculitis, hemorrhage, fibrin, and edema, delayed viral clearance and functional lung recovery, and prolonged viral shedding. This was accompanied by an altered, but not significantly different, systemic IL-10 and IL-6 profile, as well as a dysregulated serum lipid response dominated by polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing phosphatidylethanolamine, partially recapitulating cytokine and lipid responses associated with severe human COVID-19. Our data support the hamster model for testing restrictive or targeted diets and immunomodulatory therapies to mediate the adverse effects of metabolic disease on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, High-Fat/adverse effects , Dietary Carbohydrates/adverse effects , Lipid Metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Cricetinae , Cytokines/blood , Disease Models, Animal , Edema , Fibrin , Hemorrhage , Humans , Interleukin-10 , Interleukin-6 , Lipidomics , Lipids/blood , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Male , Mesocricetus , Obesity , SARS-CoV-2 , Sugars , Vasculitis/pathology , Virus Shedding
3.
Nat Med ; 27(7): 1262-1271, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550325

ABSTRACT

Preclinical and clinical data suggest that fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is anti-fibrotic, improves metabolic status and has potential to treat non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We assessed the safety and efficacy of efruxifermin, a long-acting Fc-FGF21 fusion protein, for the treatment of NASH. BALANCED was a randomized, placebo-controlled study in patients with NASH conducted at 27 centers in the United States (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03976401 ). Eighty patients, stratified by hepatic fat fraction (HFF) and fibrosis stage, were randomized using a centrally administered minimization algorithm 1:1:1:1 to receive placebo (n = 21) or efruxifermin 28 mg (n = 19), efruxifermin 50 mg (n = 20) or efruxifermin 70 mg (n = 20) via weekly subcutaneous injection for 16 weeks. The primary endpoint-absolute change from baseline in HFF measured as magnetic resonance imaging-proton density fat fraction at week 12-was met. For the full analysis set, the least squares mean absolute changes (one-sided 97.5% confidence interval) from baseline in HFF were -12.3% (-infinity (-inf), -10.3), -13.4% (-inf, -11.4) and -14.1% (-inf, -12.1) in the 28-, 50- and 70-mg groups, respectively, versus 0.3% (-inf, 1.6) in the placebo group, with statistically significant differences between efruxifermin groups and placebo (P < 0.0001 each). Overall, 70 of 79 patients who received the study drug (89%) experienced at least one treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE), with the majority grade 1-2 (64 (81%)), five (6%) grade 3 and one grade 4. The most commonly reported drug-related TEAEs were grade 1-2 gastrointestinal (36 (46%)). Treatment with efruxifermin significantly reduced HFF in patients with F1-F3 stage NASH, with an acceptable safety profile.


Subject(s)
Fibroblast Growth Factors/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments/therapeutic use , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/drug therapy , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/therapeutic use , Body Mass Index , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Liver/pathology , Liver Cirrhosis/drug therapy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Treatment Outcome
4.
J Virol ; 95(22): e0127621, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494956

ABSTRACT

The emergence of life-threatening zoonotic diseases caused by betacoronaviruses, including the ongoing coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, has highlighted the need for developing preclinical models mirroring respiratory and systemic pathophysiological manifestations seen in infected humans. Here, we showed that C57BL/6J wild-type mice intranasally inoculated with the murine betacoronavirus murine hepatitis coronavirus 3 (MHV-3) develop a robust inflammatory response leading to acute lung injuries, including alveolar edema, hemorrhage, and fibrin thrombi. Although such histopathological changes seemed to resolve as the infection advanced, they efficiently impaired respiratory function, as the infected mice displayed restricted lung distention and increased respiratory frequency and ventilation. Following respiratory manifestation, the MHV-3 infection became systemic, and a high virus burden could be detected in multiple organs along with morphological changes. The systemic manifestation of MHV-3 infection was also marked by a sharp drop in the number of circulating platelets and lymphocytes, besides the augmented concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 beta (IL-1ß), IL-6, IL-12, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), thereby mirroring some clinical features observed in moderate and severe cases of COVID-19. Importantly, both respiratory and systemic changes triggered by MHV-3 infection were greatly prevented by blocking TNF signaling, either via genetic or pharmacologic approaches. In line with this, TNF blockage also diminished the infection-mediated release of proinflammatory cytokines and virus replication of human epithelial lung cells infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Collectively, results show that MHV-3 respiratory infection leads to a large range of clinical manifestations in mice and may constitute an attractive, lower-cost, biosafety level 2 (BSL2) in vivo platform for evaluating the respiratory and multiorgan involvement of betacoronavirus infections. IMPORTANCE Mouse models have long been used as valuable in vivo platforms to investigate the pathogenesis of viral infections and effective countermeasures. The natural resistance of mice to the novel betacoronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, has launched a race toward the characterization of SARS-CoV-2 infection in other animals (e.g., hamsters, cats, ferrets, bats, and monkeys), as well as adaptation of the mouse model, by modifying either the host or the virus. In the present study, we utilized a natural pathogen of mice, MHV, as a prototype to model betacoronavirus-induced acute lung injure and multiorgan involvement under biosafety level 2 conditions. We showed that C57BL/6J mice intranasally inoculated with MHV-3 develops severe disease, which includes acute lung damage and respiratory distress that precede systemic inflammation and death. Accordingly, the proposed animal model may provide a useful tool for studies regarding betacoronavirus respiratory infection and related diseases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Lung/pathology , Murine hepatitis virus/pathogenicity , Animals , Cell Line , Containment of Biohazards , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Lung/virology , Mice , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Murine hepatitis virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
5.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(19): 5904-5912, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478932

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Liver injury has been reported in patients with COVID-19. This condition is characterized by severe outcome and could be related with the ability of SARS-CoV-2 to activate cytotoxic T cells. The purpose of this study is to show the histological and scanning electron microscopy features of liver involvement in COVID-19 to characterize the liver changes caused by the activation of multiple molecular pathways following this infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Liver biopsies from 4 patients (3 post-mortems and 1 in vivo) with COVID-19 were analyzed with histology and by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The liver changes showed significant heterogeneity. The first case showed ground glass hepatocytes and scattered fibrin aggregates in the sinusoidal lumen. The second evidenced intra-sinusoidal thrombi. The third was characterized by sinusoidal dilatation, atrophy of hepatocytes, Disse's spaces dilatation and intra-sinusoidal aggregates of fibrin and red blood cells. The fourth case exhibited diffuse fibrin aggregates in the dilated Disse spaces and microthrombi in the sinusoidal lumen. CONCLUSIONS: In COVID-19-related liver injury, a large spectrum of pathological changes was observed. The most peculiar features were very mild inflammation, intra-sinusoidal changes, including sinusoidal dilatation, thrombotic sinusoiditis and diffuse intra-sinusoidal fibrin deposition. These findings suggested that a thrombotic sinusoiditis followed by a local diffuse intra-vascular (intra-sinusoidal) coagulation could be the typical features of the SARS-CoV-2-related liver injury.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Liver Diseases/pathology , Liver/pathology , Thrombosis/pathology , Aged , Autopsy , Biopsy , Erythrocytes/pathology , Fibrin , Hepatocytes/pathology , Humans , Male , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Middle Aged , Thrombosis/complications , Young Adult
6.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 818, 2021 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477280

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Liver injuries have been reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to investigate the clinical role played by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). METHODS: In this multicentre, retrospective study, the parameters of liver function tests in COVID-19 inpatients were compared between various time-points in reference to SARS-CoV-2 shedding, and 3 to 7 days before the first detection of viral shedding was regarded as the reference baseline. RESULTS: In total, 70 COVID-19 inpatients were enrolled. Twenty-two (31.4%) patients had a self-medication history after illness. At baseline, 10 (14.3%), 7 (10%), 9 (12.9%), 2 (2.9%), 15 (21.4%), and 4 (5.7%) patients already had abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, and total bilirubin (TBIL) values, respectively. ALT and AST abnormal rates and levels did not show any significant dynamic changes during the full period of viral shedding (all p > 0.05). The GGT abnormal rate (p = 0.008) and level (p = 0.033) significantly increased on day 10 of viral shedding. Meanwhile, no simultaneous significant increases in abnormal ALP rates and levels were observed. TBIL abnormal rates and levels significantly increased on days 1 and 5 of viral shedding (all p < 0.05). Albumin abnormal decrease rates increased, and levels decreased consistently from baseline to SARS-CoV-2 clearance day (all p < 0.05). Thirteen (18.6%) patients had chronic liver disease, two of whom died. The ALT and AST abnormal rates and levels did not increase in patients with chronic liver disease during SARS-CoV-2 shedding. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 does not directly lead to elevations in ALT and AST but may result in elevations in GGT and TBIL; albumin decreased extraordinarily even when SARS-CoV-2 shedding ended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Liver/virology , Adult , Aged , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Liver/pathology , Liver Function Tests/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
7.
Lipids Health Dis ; 20(1): 126, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448237

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). At present, the COVID-19 has been prevalent worldwide for more than a year and caused more than four million deaths. Liver injury was frequently observed in patients with COVID-19. Recently, a new definition of metabolic dysfunction associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) was proposed by a panel of international experts, and the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 has been actively investigated. Several previous studies indicated that the patients with MAFLD had a higher prevalence of COVID-19 and a tendency to develop severe type of respiratory infection, and others indicated that liver injury would be exacerbated in the patients with MAFLD once infected with COVID-19. The mechanism underlying the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 infection has not been thoroughly investigated, and recent studies indicated that multifactorial mechanisms, such as altered host angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor expression, direct viral attack, disruption of cholangiocyte function, systemic inflammatory reaction, drug-induced liver injury, hepatic ischemic and hypoxic injury, and MAFLD-related glucose and lipid metabolic disorders, might jointly contribute to both of the adverse hepatic and respiratory outcomes. In this review, we discussed the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 based on current available literature, and summarized the recommendations for clinical management of MAFLD patients during the pandemic of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/complications , Hypoxia/complications , Liver/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Age Factors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/drug therapy , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/pathology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Dipeptides/therapeutic use , Gene Expression Regulation , Glucose/metabolism , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Liver/drug effects , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/drug therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/virology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 739025, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1417086

ABSTRACT

A rise in adiposity in the United States has resulted in more than 70% of adults being overweight or obese, and global obesity rates have tripled since 1975. Following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, obesity was characterized as a risk factor that could predict severe infection outcomes to viral infection. Amidst the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, obesity has remained a significant risk factor for severe viral disease as obese patients have a higher likelihood for developing severe symptoms and requiring hospitalization. However, the mechanism by which obesity enhances viral disease is unknown. In this study, we utilized a diet-induced obesity mouse model of West Nile virus (WNV) infection, a flavivirus that cycles between birds and mosquitoes and incidentally infects both humans and mice. Likelihood for severe WNV disease is associated with risk factors such as diabetes that are comorbidities also linked to obesity. Utilizing this model, we showed that obesity-associated chronic inflammation increased viral disease severity as obese female mice displayed higher mortality rates and elevated viral titers in the central nervous system. In addition, our studies highlighted that obesity also dysregulates host acute adaptive immune responses, as obese female mice displayed significant dysfunction in neutralizing antibody function. These studies highlight that obesity-induced immunological dysfunction begins at early time points post infection and is sustained through memory phase, thus illuminating a potential for obesity to alter the differentiation landscape of adaptive immune cells.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Cytokines/blood , Obesity/immunology , West Nile Fever/mortality , West Nile virus/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Liver/injuries , Liver/pathology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Obesity/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , West Nile Fever/immunology , West Nile Fever/pathology
9.
Virulence ; 12(1): 2430-2442, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406439

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is currently causing a worldwide threat with its unusually high transmission rates and rapid evolution into diverse strains. Unlike typical respiratory viruses, SARS-CoV-2 frequently causes systemic infection by breaking the boundaries of the respiratory systems. The development of animal models recapitulating the clinical manifestations of COVID-19 is of utmost importance not only for the development of vaccines and antivirals but also for understanding the pathogenesis. However, there has not been developed an animal model for systemic infection of SARS-CoV-2 representing most aspects of the clinical manifestations of COVID-19 with systemic symptoms. Here we report that a Roborovski hamster strain SH101, a laboratory inbred hamster strain of P. roborovskii, displayed most symptoms of systemic infection upon SARS-CoV-2 infection as in the case of the human counterpart, unlike current COVID-19 animal models. Roborovski hamster strain SH101 post-infection of SARS-CoV-2 represented most clinical symptoms of COVID-19 such as snuffling, labored breathing, dyspnea, cough, hunched posture, progressive weight loss, ruffled fur, and high fever following shaking chills. Histological examinations also revealed initial right-predominated pneumonia as well as slight organ damages in the brain and liver, manifesting systemic COVID-19 cases. Considering the merit of a small animal as well as its clinical manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection in human, this hamster model seems to provide an ideal tool to investigate COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cricetinae/classification , Disease Models, Animal , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Body Temperature , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Male , Mesocricetus , Mice , Mice, Transgenic
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17810, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402118

ABSTRACT

Transporters in the human liver play a major role in the clearance of endo- and xenobiotics. Apical (canalicular) transporters extrude compounds to the bile, while basolateral hepatocyte transporters promote the uptake of, or expel, various compounds from/into the venous blood stream. In the present work we have examined the in vitro interactions of some key repurposed drugs advocated to treat COVID-19 (lopinavir, ritonavir, ivermectin, remdesivir and favipiravir), with the key drug transporters of hepatocytes. These transporters included ABCB11/BSEP, ABCC2/MRP2, and SLC47A1/MATE1 in the canalicular membrane, as well as ABCC3/MRP3, ABCC4/MRP4, SLC22A1/OCT1, SLCO1B1/OATP1B1, SLCO1B3/OATP1B3, and SLC10A1/NTCP, residing in the basolateral membrane. Lopinavir and ritonavir in low micromolar concentrations inhibited BSEP and MATE1 exporters, as well as OATP1B1/1B3 uptake transporters. Ritonavir had a similar inhibitory pattern, also inhibiting OCT1. Remdesivir strongly inhibited MRP4, OATP1B1/1B3, MATE1 and OCT1. Favipiravir had no significant effect on any of these transporters. Since both general drug metabolism and drug-induced liver toxicity are strongly dependent on the functioning of these transporters, the various interactions reported here may have important clinical relevance in the drug treatment of this viral disease and the existing co-morbidities.


Subject(s)
ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 11/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Liver-Specific Organic Anion Transporter 1/metabolism , Liver/drug effects , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/metabolism , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 11/antagonists & inhibitors , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Comorbidity , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Liver-Specific Organic Anion Transporter 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Lopinavir/chemistry , Lopinavir/metabolism , Lopinavir/pharmacology , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Ritonavir/chemistry , Ritonavir/metabolism , Ritonavir/pharmacology , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Substrate Specificity
12.
Hepatology ; 74(4): 1825-1844, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372726

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: NASH will soon become the leading cause of liver transplantation in the United States and is also associated with increased COVID-19 mortality. Currently, there are no Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs available that slow NASH progression or address NASH liver involvement in COVID-19. Because animal models cannot fully recapitulate human NASH, we hypothesized that stem cells isolated directly from end-stage liver from patients with NASH may address current knowledge gaps in human NASH pathology. APPROACH AND RESULTS: We devised methods that allow the derivation, proliferation, hepatic differentiation, and extensive characterization of bipotent ductal organoids from irreversibly damaged liver from patients with NASH. The transcriptomes of organoids derived from NASH liver, but not healthy liver, show significant up-regulation of proinflammatory and cytochrome p450-related pathways, as well as of known liver fibrosis and tumor markers, with the degree of up-regulation being patient-specific. Functionally, NASH liver organoids exhibit reduced passaging/growth capacity and hallmarks of NASH liver, including decreased albumin production, increased free fatty acid-induced lipid accumulation, increased sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli, and increased cytochrome P450 metabolism. After hepatic differentiation, NASH liver organoids exhibit reduced ability to dedifferentiate back to the biliary state, consistent with the known reduced regenerative ability of NASH livers. Intriguingly, NASH liver organoids also show strongly increased permissiveness to severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vesicular stomatitis pseudovirus as well as up-regulation of ubiquitin D, a known inhibitor of the antiviral interferon host response. CONCLUSION: Expansion of primary liver stem cells/organoids derived directly from irreversibly damaged liver from patients with NASH opens up experimental avenues for personalized disease modeling and drug development that has the potential to slow human NASH progression and to counteract NASH-related SARS-CoV-2 effects.


Subject(s)
End Stage Liver Disease/pathology , Liver/pathology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology , Organoids/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Biopsy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cell Differentiation/immunology , End Stage Liver Disease/immunology , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Healthy Volunteers , Hepatocytes/immunology , Hepatocytes/metabolism , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/immunology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , Liver/cytology , Liver/immunology , Liver Regeneration , Male , Middle Aged , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/immunology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/virology , Organoids/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Up-Regulation/immunology
13.
Life Sci ; 284: 119881, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347741

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an infectious disease that has spread worldwide. Current treatments are limited in both availability and efficacy, such that improving our understanding of the factors that facilitate infection is urgently needed to more effectively treat infected individuals and to curb the pandemic. We and others have previously demonstrated the significance of interactions between the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, integrin α5ß1, and human ACE2 to facilitate viral entry into host cells in vitro. We previously found that inhibition of integrin α5ß1 by the clinically validated small peptide ATN-161 inhibits these spike protein interactions and cell infection in vitro. In continuation with our previous findings, here we have further evaluated the therapeutic potential of ATN-161 on SARS-CoV-2 infection in k18-hACE2 transgenic (SARS-CoV-2 susceptible) mice in vivo. We discovered that treatment with single or repeated intravenous doses of ATN-161 (1 mg/kg) within 48 h after intranasal inoculation with SARS-CoV-2 lead to a reduction of lung viral load, viral immunofluorescence, and improved lung histology in a majority of mice 72 h post-infection. Furthermore, ATN-161 reduced SARS-CoV-2-induced increased expression of lung integrin α5 and αv (an α5-related integrin that has also been implicated in SARS-CoV-2 interactions) as well as the C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 (Cxcl10), further supporting the potential involvement of these integrins, and the anti-inflammatory potential of ATN-161, respectively, in SARS-CoV-2 infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the potential therapeutic efficacy of targeting integrin α5ß1 in SARS-CoV-2 infection in vivo and supports the development of ATN-161 as a novel SARS-CoV-2 therapy.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Oligopeptides/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Alanine Transaminase/metabolism , Animals , Aspartate Aminotransferases/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Genome, Viral , Humans , Integrins/metabolism , Liver/enzymology , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Oligopeptides/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Staining and Labeling , Viral Load/genetics
15.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(15): 5063-5069, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346861

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Vaccine-induced immune thrombocytopenia (VITT) is a new syndrome occurring primarily in healthy young adults, with a female predominance, after receiving the first dose of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. We describe VITT syndrome characterized by severe thrombosis and thrombocytopenia found in our patient, with fatal outcome. CASE REPORT: A 58-year-old man, after 13 days from the first administration of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine (AstraZeneca), presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomitus. Laboratory tests revealed a severe thrombocytopenia, low fibrinogen serum levels and marked increase of D-dimer serum levels. The patient quickly developed a multiple organ failure, till death, three days after the hospital admission. RESULTS: At histology, in the lungs, interalveolar septa appeared thickened with microthrombi in the capillaries and veins. Interalveolar septa appeared thickened and showed vascular proliferation. Thrombi were detected in the capillaries of glomerular tufts. In the hearth, thrombi were observed in veins and capillaries. In the liver, voluminous fibrin thrombi were diffusely observed in the branches of the portal vein. Microthrombi were also found in the vasa vasorum of the wall of abdominal aorta. In the brain, microthrombi were observed in the capillaries of the choroid plexuses. Diffuse hemorrhagic necrosis was observed in the intestinal wall with marked congestion of the venous vessels. CONCLUSIONS: In our patient, the majority of data necessary for a VITT final diagnosis were present: thrombocytopenia and thrombosis in pulmonary, portal, hepatic, renal and mesenteric veins, associated with a marked increase of D-dimer serum levels. The finding of cerebral thrombosis in choroid plexuses, is a new finding in VITT. These features are suggestive for a very aggressive form of VITT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/etiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Aorta/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Choroid Plexus/pathology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Ileum/pathology , Kidney/pathology , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardium/pathology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/blood , Thrombosis/blood
16.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 914-923, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343627

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus or COVID-19 has first been found in Wuhan, China, and became pandemic. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) plays a key role in the host cells as a receptor of Spike-I Glycoprotein of COVID-19 which causes final infection. ACE2 is highly expressed in the bladder, ileum, kidney and liver, comparing with ACE2 expression in the lung-specific pulmonary alveolar type II cells. In this study, the single-cell RNAseq data of the five tissues from different humans are curated and cell types with high expressions of ACE2 are identified. Subsequently, the protein-protein interaction networks have been established. From the network, potential biomarkers which can form functional hubs, are selected based on k-means network clustering. It is observed that angiotensin PPAR family proteins show important roles in the functional hubs. To understand the functions of the potential markers, corresponding pathways have been researched thoroughly through the pathway semantic networks. Subsequently, the pathways have been ranked according to their influence and dependency in the network using PageRank algorithm. The outcomes show some important facts in terms of infection. Firstly, renin-angiotensin system and PPAR signaling pathway can play a vital role for enhancing the infection after its intrusion through ACE2. Next, pathway networks consist of few basic metabolic and influential pathways, e.g. insulin resistance. This information corroborate the fact that diabetic patients are more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection. Interestingly, the key regulators of the aforementioned pathways are angiontensin and PPAR family proteins. Hence, angiotensin and PPAR family proteins can be considered as possible therapeutic targets. Contact: sagnik.sen2008@gmail.com, umaulik@cse.jdvu.ac.in Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available online.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Algorithms , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Ileum/metabolism , Ileum/pathology , Kidney/metabolism , Kidney/pathology , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors/metabolism , Protein Interaction Maps , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Urinary Bladder/metabolism , Urinary Bladder/pathology
17.
JCI Insight ; 6(14)2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320462

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), remains a pandemic. Severe disease is associated with dysfunction of multiple organs, but some infected cells do not express ACE2, the canonical entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Here, we report that the C-type lectin receptor L-SIGN interacted in a Ca2+-dependent manner with high-mannose-type N-glycans on the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We found that L-SIGN was highly expressed on human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and lymph node lymphatic endothelial cells but not on blood endothelial cells. Using high-resolution confocal microscopy imaging, we detected SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins within the LSECs from liver autopsy samples from patients with COVID-19. We found that both pseudo-typed virus enveloped with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and authentic SARS-CoV-2 virus infected L-SIGN-expressing cells relative to control cells. Moreover, blocking L-SIGN function reduced CoV-2-type infection. These results indicate that L-SIGN is a receptor for SARS-CoV-2 infection. LSECs are major sources of the clotting factors vWF and factor VIII (FVIII). LSECs from liver autopsy samples from patients with COVID-19 expressed substantially higher levels of vWF and FVIII than LSECs from uninfected liver samples. Our data demonstrate that L-SIGN is an endothelial cell receptor for SARS-CoV-2 that may contribute to COVID-19-associated coagulopathy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Capillaries , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Endothelial Cells , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Liver/blood supply , Lymphatic Vessels , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Capillaries/metabolism , Capillaries/pathology , Capillaries/virology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Humans , Liver/pathology , Lymphatic Vessels/metabolism , Lymphatic Vessels/pathology , Lymphatic Vessels/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Virus Internalization
18.
J Autoimmun ; 123: 102706, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309270

ABSTRACT

Autoimmune phenomena and clinically apparent autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune hepatitis, are increasingly been reported not only after natural infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, but also after vaccination against it. We report the case of a 63-year old man without a history of autoimmunity or SARS-CoV-2 natural infection who experienced acute severe autoimmune-like hepatitis seven days after the first dose of the mRNA-1273 SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Liver histology showed inflammatory portal infiltrate with interface hepatitis, lobular and centrilobular inflammation with centrilobular necrosis, in absence of fibrosis and steatosis. Serum immunoglobulin G was slightly elevated. Autoimmune liver serology showed an indirect immunofluorescence pattern on triple rodent tissue compatible with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA), but, unexpectedly, this pattern was not mirrored by positivity for primary biliary cholangitis (PBC)-specific molecular tests, indicating that this antibody is different from classical AMA. Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) was also positive with a rim-like indirect immunofluorescence pattern on liver and HEp2 cell substrates, similar to PBC-specific ANA; however, anti-gp210 and a large panel of molecular-based assays for nuclear antigens were negative, suggesting a unique ANA in our patient. He carries the HLA DRB1*11:01 allele, which is protective against PBC. Response to prednisone treatment was satisfactory. The clinical significance of these novel specificities needs to be further evaluated in this emerging condition.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , HLA-DRB1 Chains/immunology , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/etiology , Mitochondria/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Animals , Antibodies, Antinuclear/immunology , Antibody Specificity , Autoantigens/immunology , Cell Line , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/drug therapy , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/immunology , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/pathology , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Liver/immunology , Liver/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Rosuvastatin Calcium/adverse effects , Rosuvastatin Calcium/therapeutic use
19.
Liver Int ; 41 Suppl 1: 1-8, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280355

ABSTRACT

Liver involvement, indicated by elevated liver function test results, is common in hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and has been linked to disease severity and outcome. A dual pattern of elevated liver function tests can be observed especially in patients with severe or critical COVID-19, characterized by an increase in aminotransferases early in the course of this disease, followed by an increase in cholestasis-associated biochemistry markers at later stages. This dual pattern is associated with inflammatory response markers and poor outcome. Current notions on the mechanisms of liver injury in COVID-19 include direct cytopathic effects of the virus on hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, ischemic and hypoxic liver damage, drug-induced liver injury, activation of hepatic immune cells by excess cytokine production and exacerbation of pre-existing liver disease. Patients with obesity-related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and, in particular, patients with cirrhosis are at high risk of liver injury and a fatal outcome from COVID-19. In contrast, individuals receiving stable immunosuppressive medication for autoimmune liver diseases or during long-term follow-up after liver transplantation do not have a higher case-to-infection ratio and have a fairly favourable outcome. The present review describes the epidemiology, characteristics and potential pathological mechanisms of COVID-19-related liver injury. Moreover, the influence of pre-existing liver disease on the susceptibility and severity of liver injury in COVID-19 are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Liver Diseases , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease , Humans , Liver/pathology , Liver Cirrhosis/pathology , Liver Diseases/pathology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Hepatology ; 74(2): 1088-1100, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274693

ABSTRACT

Infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel coronavirus that emerged in late 2019, is posing an unprecedented challenge to global health. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the clinical disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, has a variable presentation ranging from asymptomatic infection to life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. Liver involvement is common during COVID-19 and exhibits a spectrum of clinical manifestations from asymptomatic elevations of liver function tests to hepatic decompensation. The presence of abnormal liver tests has been associated with a more severe presentation of COVID-19 disease and overall mortality. Although SARS-CoV-2 RNA has been detected in the liver of patients with COVID-19, it remains unclear whether SARS-CoV-2 productively infects and replicates in liver cells and has a direct liver-pathogenic effect. The cause of liver injury in COVID-19 can be attributed to multiple factors, including virus-induced systemic inflammation, hypoxia, hepatic congestion, and drug-induced liver disease. Among patients with cirrhosis, COVID-19 has been associated with hepatic decompensation and liver-related mortality. Additionally, COVID-19's impact on health care resources can adversely affect delivery of care and outcomes of patients with chronic liver disease. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of liver injury during COVID-19 will be important in the management of patients with COVID-19, especially those with advanced liver disease. This review summarizes our current knowledge of SARS-CoV-2 virus-host interactions in the liver as well the clinical impact of liver disease in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Liver Cirrhosis/diagnosis , Liver/pathology , Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Disease Progression , Global Health , Humans , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Liver Function Tests , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
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