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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261346, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571993

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 has affected people's health in various ways. University students are a particularly sensitive group for mental and physical health issues. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the mental and physical health of male and female first-year university students during and before COVID-19. METHOD: Total of 115 first-year university students (54% male) answered questions about mental and physical health. The students were asked to estimate their physical activity, sedentary behavior, loneliness, stress, and sleep quality during COVID-19 opposed to before the pandemic. RESULT: Males had fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and their self-esteem was higher than females (p<0.05). Over 50% of both genders estimated their mental health to be worse than before COVID-19. Larger proportion of males (69%) compared to females (38%) estimated that their physical health had worsened than before the pandemic. Larger proportion of females (38%) than males (14%) experience increased loneliness and stress (68% vs. 48%). Over 70% of both genders estimated increased sedentary behavior than before the pandemic, and larger proportion of males (76%), compared to females (56%), estimated that they were less physically active than before COVID-19. About 50% of participants estimated their sleep quality was worse than before COVID-19. CONCLUSION: University students estimated their mental and physical health to have deteriorated during the pandemic. Therefore, it is important that the school and healthcare systems assist students in unwinding these negative health and lifestyle changes that have accompanied the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Loneliness/psychology , Students/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Iceland/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior , Sex Characteristics , Young Adult
3.
Public Health Res Pract ; 31(3)2021 Sep 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471205

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidence, based on the synthesis of reports from past infectious disease-related public health emergencies, supports an association between previous pandemics and a heightened risk of suicide or suicide-related behaviours and outcomes. Anxiety associated with pandemic media reporting appears to be one critical contributing factor. Social isolation, loneliness, and the disconnect that can result from public health strategies during global pandemics also appear to increase suicide risk in vulnerable individuals. Innovative suicide risk assessment and prevention strategies are needed to recognise and adapt to the negative impacts of pandemics on population mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Suicide/prevention & control , Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Mental Health , Public Health , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology , Suicide/psychology
5.
Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry ; 110: 110330, 2021 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health measures to contain the spread of COVID-19 have resulted in adverse effects, including high level of psychological distress, anxiety, and depression. AIMS: This study explored adolescent psychopathological profiles at age 17, and their role in predicting the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic at age 19. METHODS: The analyses used a sample of 904 participants (mean age = 19.17 years) from the Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) sweep 7 who completed the mental health questions from January 2018 to March 2019 (mean age = 17.18 years) and the COVID-19 Survey in May 2020. Adolescent psychopathological profiles were identified by means of latent class analysis. RESULTS: Four psychopathological profiles were identified: "low-symptom class" (60.17% of participants), "high-symptom class" (23.01% of participants), "substance/behavioural addictions class" (12.03% of participants), and "emotion-dysregulation class" (4.79% of participants). Adolescents in the high-symptom and emotional-dysregulation classes had the worst outcome during the lockdown. Specifically, they experienced more stress, conflict and loneliness, and lower levels of perceived social support than adolescents in the other psychopathological classes. Adolescents in the emotional-dysregulation class also consumed more alcohol and had worse financial situation during the lockdown compared to pre- lockdown period. CONCLUSION: Adolescent psychopathological profiles predicted mental health impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Psychological Distress , Psychopathology , Risk Factors , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Int J Public Health ; 66: 1604164, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394849

ABSTRACT

Objectives: During the first peak of the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States, we investigated the impact of digital interventions to reduce COVID-19 related fear, loneliness, and public stigma. Methods: We recruited and randomly assigned 988 United States residents to: 1) no intervention 2) informational sheet to learn about COVID-19, 3) (2) AND video encouraging digital social activity, 4) (2) AND video sensitizing to COVID-19 related stigma (registered in Clinicaltrials.gov). Surveys were conducted between April 2-16, 2020. We employed generalized linear mixed models to investigate intervention effects. Results: 10% of the participants reported not being afraid of people COVID-19+ and 32% reported not feeling lonely. Stigma and fear items reflected acute worries about the outbreak. Relative to the informational sheet only group, video groups led to greater reduction in perceptions of fear towards COVID-19+ (ORvideo.solo = 0.78, p-val<0.001; ORvideo.friend = 0.79, p-val<0.001) and of stigma (BETAvideo.solo = -0.50, p-val<0.001; BETAvideo.friend = -0.69, p-val<0.001). Conclusion: Video-based interventions lead to reductions in COVID-19-related fear and stigma. No difference in social activity among groups was found, potentially explaining lack of efficacy on loneliness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychosocial Intervention , Video Recording , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Middle Aged , Perception , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Social Stigma , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(9): 622-627, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376356

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nostalgia and homesickness are not currently regarded as mental disorders. The psychic pain associated with longing to return home had been considered a mental disorder for centuries, especially in Europe, where it was a sign of moral weakness between nations. Nostalgia's effects on American Civil War soldiers-anxiety, depression, and sleep and appetite disturbances, for example-were described by clinicians and linked to significant morbidity and mortality. Since then, although these effects of combat have been of interest, focus has shifted to psychic trauma, relegating the concept of nostalgia to an unclassified but commonly encountered condition. Besides wartime trauma, symptomatic conditions related to nostalgia have been described among displaced persons and refugees living in the diaspora longing for their homelands (e.g., social displacement syndrome). More recently, nostalgia has pervaded culture as a benign pastime, with no implications for psychopathology. Finally, the longing for return to an idyllic or imagined lifestyle has returned amid worldwide quarantining and isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this new sense, nostalgia has become a remedy rather than a disease. We identify four major iterations of nostalgia: the medical condition of homesickness, the condition studied in wartime, the application to migration and social displacement, and as a remedy for existential anxiety. We conclude that nostalgia per se is neither pathological nor normative, but a consistent phenomenon in human existence that should not be overlooked in cultural assessment and psychotherapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Social Behavior , Humans , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Social Problems
8.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(10): 918-925, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376163

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and postponement of elective surgical procedures for profoundly deaf patients awaiting cochlear implantation. METHOD: Open-ended questionnaires were sent to all adult patients awaiting cochlear implantation surgery. Qualitative analysis was performed using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Participants described a primarily negative impact on wellbeing from the surgery delay, expressing feelings of isolation or loneliness. Low mood, depression or hopelessness were commonly expressed by elderly participants; frustration and anxiety were described by young adults. Participants described a negative impact on their general daily life, describing difficulties communicating with facemasks and struggles with reliance on telephone communication because of social distancing. Despite these significant psychosocial challenges, only a minority described adaptive coping strategies. DISCUSSION: Profoundly deaf patients may be at greater psychosocial risk because of unique challenges from their hearing disability. Our findings can be used to develop evidence-driven strategies to improve communication, wellbeing and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Cochlear Implantation/methods , Cochlear Implants/statistics & numerical data , Deafness/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cochlear Implants/supply & distribution , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Female , Frustration , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Qualitative Research , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
9.
Ann Clin Psychiatry ; 33(3): 232-240, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current study aimed to determine the role of psychological experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic (depression, anxiety, loneliness, and COVID-19-related grief and worry) on young adult physical and mental health functioning as measured by health-related quality of life (HRQoL). METHODS: Using hierarchical multiple regression analyses, this cross-sectional study examined psychological predictors of physical and mental health functioning among young adults (age 18 to 30 years) from April 13 to September 5, 2020. RESULTS: Pre-existing depression diagnoses (beta = -0.124, P < .001), current depression symptoms (beta = -0.298, P < .001), and COVID-19-related worry (beta = -0.142, P < .001) significantly predicted poorer physical health functioning. Current depression and anxiety symptoms (beta = -0.342 and beta = -0.268), loneliness (beta = -0.135), and COVID-19-related grief (beta = -0.180) predicted lower self-reported mental health functioning (P < .001). Black (beta = -0.072) and Hispanic/Latinx participants (beta = -0.082) were more likely to indicate poorer physical health functioning (P < .01) relative to White participants, whereas women reported poorer mental health relative to men (beta = -0.047, P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies potential negative impacts of pandemic-related psychological experiences for young adults' health during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a need to consider mental health symptomatology, COVID-19-related experiences, race, and gender when designing efforts to address long-term implications on health.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Depression/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Young Adult
11.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 23(5): 455-461, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328958

ABSTRACT

This discussion article highlights the challenges of providing hospice care in nursing homes since the start of the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic and illuminates practice changes needed in nursing homes. The article provides an overview of the expectations of hospice care, explains the differences in delivering hospice care during the COVID-19 pandemic, examines social isolation and emotional loneliness and the role of familial caregivers, and describes policy changes related to the COVID-19 affecting hospice care delivery in nursing homes. This article answers the following questions: (1) How did residents receiving hospice care have their needs met during the COVID-19 pandemic? (2) What areas of nursing home care need to be improved through governmental policy and restructuring? This article also summarized the lessons learned as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and provided practical implications for nursing, specific to changes in hospice care deliveries for nursing home residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospice Care/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Hospice Care/organization & administration , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Needs Assessment , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology
12.
Public Health Rep ; 136(6): 754-764, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319442

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Loneliness is associated with increased risks of adverse health outcomes among middle-aged and older adults. We estimated the prevalence of loneliness and identified key sociodemographic, employment, living, and health-related risk factors for loneliness among adults aged ≥55 during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, when much of the country was under shelter-in-place orders. METHODS: We collected data from online questionnaires in the COVID-19 Coping Study, a national study of 6938 US adults aged ≥55 from April 2 through May 31, 2020. We estimated the population-weighted prevalence of loneliness (scores ≥6 of 9 on the 3-item UCLA Loneliness Scale), overall and by sociodemographic, employment, living, and health-related factors. We used population-weighted modified Poisson regression models to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the associations between these factors and loneliness, adjusting for age, sex, race, ethnicity, and education level. RESULTS: Overall, we estimated that 29.5% (95% CI, 27.9%31.3%) of US adults aged ≥55 were considered high in loneliness in April and May 2020. In population-weighted adjusted models, loneliness was the most prevalent among those who reported depression, who were not married or in a relationship, who lived alone, and who were unemployed at the onset of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: We identified subpopulations of middle-aged and older adults who were vulnerable to loneliness during a period when COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders were in place across most of the country. These insights may inform the allocation of resources to mitigate an unintended health consequence during times of restricted activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Loneliness/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology
13.
Clin Psychol Rev ; 88: 102066, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313025

ABSTRACT

Chronic loneliness is associated with a range of mental health difficulties. Previous theory and research indicate that psychological interventions show promise for reducing loneliness, however, there have been no systematic reviews or meta-analyses to ascertain the efficacy of these interventions across the lifespan. The aim of this study was to synthesise, meta-analyse and explore the heterogeneity in RCTs of psychological interventions for loneliness in order to establish their efficacy. Five databases (Ovid Embase, Ovid Medline, PsycINFO, Web of Science and CINAHL) were systematically searched in order to identify relevant studies. Included studies were required to be peer-reviewed RCTs examining psychological interventions for loneliness. Two independent coders examined the abstracts of the 3973 studies and 103 full texts, finding 31 studies that met inclusion criteria, 28 of which contained sufficient statistical information to be included in the meta-analysis. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. The 31 studies (N = 3959) that were included in the systematic review were conducted with participants from a diverse range of cultures, age groups and populations. The interventions were of mixed quality and were mostly face to face, group-based and delivered weekly. The most common type of intervention was Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). 28 studies (N = 3039) were included in a meta-analysis which found that psychological interventions significantly reduced loneliness compared to control groups, yielding a small to medium effect size (g = 0.43). Subgroup analysis and meta-regressions were conducted in order to explore heterogeneity and found that type of psychological intervention was approaching significance as a moderator of the effectiveness of psychological interventions for loneliness. In conclusion, psychological interventions for loneliness across the lifespan are effective. This finding should inform policy makers, researchers and clinicians going forward, especially in the context of increased loneliness due to the COVID-19 pandemic. There was considerable heterogeneity in the effectiveness of the interventions, suggesting that future research should also explore what works for whom and consider personalising psychological treatment.


Subject(s)
Loneliness/psychology , Psychosocial Intervention , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Treatment Outcome
14.
Am J Mens Health ; 15(4): 15579883211030021, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299308

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to be a source of stress and have important mental health implications for all persons but may have unique implications for men. In addition to the risk of contracting and dying from COVID-19, the rising COVID-19 death toll, ongoing economic uncertainty, loneliness from social distancing, and other changes to our lifestyles make up the perfect recipe for a decline in mental health. In June 2020, men reported slightly lower rates of anxiety than women, but had higher rates of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation. As of September 2020, men sought mental health care at a higher rate than women for family and relationships, with year-over-year visits up 5.5 times and total virtual mental health care visits monthly growth in 2020 was up 79% since January. Because men are not a homogeneous group, it is important to implement strategies for groups of men that may have particularly unique needs. In this paper, we discuss considerations for intervening in men's mental health during and in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including current technology-based cyberpsychology options.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Help-Seeking Behavior , Men's Health/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Suicidal Ideation
15.
COPD ; 18(4): 443-448, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284829

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in 2020, many governments have been imposing confinement and physical distancing measures. No data exist on the effects of lockdowns on the health status of patients affected by chronic pathologies, specifically those with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Our study aims to establish variations across the psychological and cognitive profile of patients during the isolation period in Italy, in a cohort of patients affected by COPD, between February and May 2020. Forty patients with established COPD were comprehensively evaluated by geriatric multidimensional assessment before the spread of the epidemic in Italy, and submitted to a second evaluation during the subsequent lockdown. We assessed functional ability, basic and instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL and IADL), cognition and mood status. We compared the scores obtained at baseline against those obtained during the pandemic, and used mean differences for correlation with major clinical and functional indexes. The score differences from MMSE, ADL and IADL were statistically significant. Such differences were correlated to the presence of a caregiver and to the total number of family members living together. Remarkably, the loneliness dimension, more than the restrictions themselves, seemed to represent the major determinant of altered health status and depressed psycho-cognitive profile in our population. Also remarkably, we detected no correlation between the score variation and the respiratory function indexes of disease severity. The isolation measures adopted during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic have triggered the classic clinical string associated to geriatric isolation, which leads to a deterioration of cognitive functions, independence and frailty levels in a population affected by a chronic degenerative disease, such as COPD. If considered from a multidimensional geriatric point of view, the individual benefit of isolation measures could be small or non-existent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cognition/physiology , Loneliness/psychology , Mental Health , Physical Distancing , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/psychology , Activities of Daily Living , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cohort Studies , Female , Geriatric Assessment , Health Status , Humans , Italy , Male , Mental Status and Dementia Tests , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/physiopathology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Psychoneuroendocrinology ; 132: 105345, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284482

ABSTRACT

Loneliness is associated with multiple forms of psychopathology in youth. However, we do not yet know how loneliness gets "under the skin" in ways that may impact the long-term health and development of early adolescents. In particular, loneliness may influence youths' patterns of diurnal cortisol, an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and a central predictor of health across the lifespan. The current severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2, or COVID-19) pandemic represents a salient period in which to study the consequences of loneliness, as recent work has provided evidence that the physical-distancing measures put in place to contain the virus have resulted in greater loneliness, particularly among youth. Thus, the current study aimed to examine the prospective association between loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic and diurnal cortisol in early adolescents. We found that greater loneliness was associated with higher levels of cortisol at waking and a blunted cortisol awakening response (CAR). These results held even when controlling for covariates that can influence diurnal trajectories of cortisol. Critically, this pattern of HPA-axis functioning increases risk for adverse mental and physical health outcomes across adolescence and into adulthood. This study is the first to examine the prospective association between loneliness and diurnal cortisol in early adolescence, and the first to identify mechanisms that contribute to biological markers of distress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings underscore the importance of developing and distributing strategies to mitigate feelings of loneliness among youth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Circadian Rhythm , Hydrocortisone/metabolism , Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/metabolism , Loneliness/psychology , Pituitary-Adrenal System/metabolism , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Hydrocortisone/analysis , Male , Pituitary-Adrenal Function Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Saliva/chemistry
17.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253734, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282312

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Worldwide mandates for social distancing and home-quarantine have contributed to loneliness and social isolation. We conducted a systematic scoping review to identify network-building interventions that address loneliness and isolation, describe their components and impact on network structure, and consider their application in the wake of COVID19. METHODS: We performed forward and backward citation tracking of three seminal publications on network interventions and Bibliographic search of Web of Science and SCOPUS. We developed data charting tables and extracted and synthesized the characteristics of included studies, using an iteratively updating form. FINDINGS: From 3390 retrieved titles and abstracts, we included 8 studies. These interventions focused on building networks at either individual- or group-levels. Key elements that were incorporated in the interventions at varying degrees included (a) creating opportunities to build networks; (b) improving social skills; (c) assessing network diagnostics (i.e. using network data or information to inform network strategies); (d) promoting engagement with influential actors; and (e) a process for goal-setting and feedback. The effect of interventions on network structures, or the moderating effect of structure on the intervention effectiveness was rarely assessed. CONCLUSIONS: As many natural face-to-face opportunities for social connection are limited due to COVID19, groups already at risk for social isolation and loneliness are disproportionately impacted. Network-building interventions include multiple components that address both the structure of individuals' networks, and their skills and motivation for activating them. These intervention elements could be adapted for delivery via online platforms, and implemented by trained facilitators or novice volunteers, although more rigorous testing is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Motivation , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male
18.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211026409, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282203

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 has been spreading across the world since December 2019. The pandemic has created tremendous fear of death from infection and awful psychological pressure on healthcare professionals (HCPs). The measures of psychological effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on the Bangladeshi HCPs are unknown. The present study aimed to assess the mental health outcomes of Bangladeshi HCPs and associated risk factors. We conducted this cross-sectional study from July 15 to September 20, 2020. A total of 355 HCPs aged between 20 and 60 years residing in Bangladesh participated in this study. All the participants completed a self-administered questionnaire through Google Forms consisting of socio-demographic characteristics and mental health outcomes. We measure loneliness, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance using the UCLA loneliness scale-8, patient health questionnaire-9, 7-item generalized anxiety disorder scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index. The present study observed the prevalence of loneliness, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance among HCPs were 89%, 44%, 78%, and 87%, respectively. The factors significantly associated with the development of mental health problems among HCPs were working environment, economic condition, education level, area of residence, marital status, gender differences, professional category, body mass index, and smoking habit. Moreover, we have seen significant correlations among the different mental health outcomes. In Bangladesh, a large portion of HCPs reported mental health issues during the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 pandemic incredibly impacted the psychological health of Bangladeshi healthcare professionals. Appropriate supportive programs and interventional initiatives might help the HCPs with mental health problems during and after this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/physiopathology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Cancer ; 127(19): 3671-3679, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279355

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had wide-ranging health effects and increased isolation. Older with cancer patients might be especially vulnerable to loneliness and poor mental health during the pandemic. METHODS: The authors included active participants enrolled in the longitudinal Thinking and Living With Cancer study of nonmetastatic breast cancer survivors aged 60 to 89 years (n = 262) and matched controls (n = 165) from 5 US regions. Participants completed questionnaires at parent study enrollment and then annually, including a web-based or telephone COVID-19 survey, between May 27 and September 11, 2020. Mixed-effects models were used to examine changes in loneliness (a single item on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression [CES-D] scale) from before to during the pandemic in survivors versus controls and to test survivor-control differences in the associations between changes in loneliness and changes in mental health, including depression (CES-D, excluding the loneliness item), anxiety (the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), and perceived stress (the Perceived Stress Scale). Models were adjusted for age, race, county COVID-19 death rates, and time between assessments. RESULTS: Loneliness increased from before to during the pandemic (0.211; P = .001), with no survivor-control differences. Increased loneliness was associated with worsening depression (3.958; P < .001) and anxiety (3.242; P < .001) symptoms and higher stress (1.172; P < .001) during the pandemic, also with no survivor-control differences. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer survivors reported changes in loneliness and mental health similar to those reported by women without cancer. However, both groups reported increased loneliness from before to during the pandemic that was related to worsening mental health, suggesting that screening for loneliness during medical care interactions will be important for identifying all older women at risk for adverse mental health effects of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/virology , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(6): 565-566, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275789
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