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1.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 22(1): 955, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526623

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, chronic low back pain (CLBP) is the leading cause of disability associated with economic costs. However, it has received little attention in low-and-middle-income countries. This study estimated the prevalence and risk factors of CLBP among adults presenting at selected hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal. METHODOLOGY: This cross-sectional study was conducted among adults aged ≥18 years who attended the selected hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal during the study period. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic, work-related factors, and information about CLBP. The SPSS version 24.0 (IBM SPSS Inc) was used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics were used for demographic characteristics of participants. CLBP risk factors were assessed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A p-value of ≤0.05 was deemed statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 678 adults participated in this study. The overall prevalence of CLBP was 18.1% (95% CI: 15.3 - 21.3) with females having a higher prevalence than males, 19.8% (95% CI: 16.0 - 24.1) and 15.85% (95% CI: 11.8 - 20.6), respectively. Using multivariate regression analysis, the following risk factors were identified: overweight (aOR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.1 - 12.3, p = 0.032), no formal education (aOR: 6.1, 95% CI: 2.1 - 18.1, p = 0.001), lack of regular physical exercises (aOR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.0 - 4.8, p = 0.044), smoking 1 to 10 (aOR: 4.5, 95% CI: 2.0 - 10.2, p < 0.001) and more than 11 cigarettes per day (aOR: 25.3, 95% CI: 10.4 - 61.2, p < 0.001), occasional and frequent consumption of alcohol, aOR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.1 - 5.9, p < 0.001 and aOR: 11.3, 95% CI: 4.9 - 25.8, p < 0.001, respectively, a sedentary lifestyle (aOR: 31.8, 95% CI: 11.2 - 90.2, p < 0.001), manual work (aOR: 26.2, 95% CI: 10.1 - 68.4, p < 0.001) and a stooped sitting posture (aOR: 6.0, 95% CI: 2.0 - 17.6, p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study concluded that the prevalence of CLBP in KwaZulu-Natal is higher than in other regions, and that it is predicted by a lack of formal education, overweight, lack of regular physical exercises, smoking, alcohol consumption, sedentary lifestyle, manual work, and a stooped posture.


Subject(s)
Low Back Pain , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Low Back Pain/diagnosis , Low Back Pain/epidemiology , Male , Prevalence , Risk Factors , South Africa/epidemiology
3.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(4): 307-312, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266237

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The clinical manifestations of COVID-19 range from mild symptoms to severe pneumonia and severe organ damage. When evaluated specifically for pain, the data so far have shown that myalgia, headache, and chest pain can be seen in patients at varying rates; myalgia and headache, especially, are among the initial symptoms. DESIGN: This retrospective chart review, followed by a descriptive survey design study, was carried out by examining patients afflicted with COVID-19. After discharge, patients were asked about the severity and the body region of their pain, their use of analgesics, their mood and mental health, and their overall quality of life. RESULTS: A total of 206 patients with a mean age of 56.24 ± 16.99 yrs were included in the study. Pain during COVID-19 was found to be higher compared with the preinfectious and postinfectious states. The most frequent painful areas were reported to be the neck and back before the infection, whereas the head and limbs during the infection. The most frequently used analgesic during infection was paracetamol. There was no relationship between the patients' pain and anxiety and depression; the quality of life was found to be worse in patients with persistent pain. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the head and limbs were the most common painful body regions during COVID-19. It was also found that pain can continue in the postinfection period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Myalgia/diagnosis , Pain Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Female , Headache/diagnosis , Humans , Low Back Pain/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Neck Pain/diagnosis , Physical Examination , Primary Health Care/methods , Retrospective Studies
4.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(4): 307-312, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066489

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The clinical manifestations of COVID-19 range from mild symptoms to severe pneumonia and severe organ damage. When evaluated specifically for pain, the data so far have shown that myalgia, headache, and chest pain can be seen in patients at varying rates; myalgia and headache, especially, are among the initial symptoms. DESIGN: This retrospective chart review, followed by a descriptive survey design study, was carried out by examining patients afflicted with COVID-19. After discharge, patients were asked about the severity and the body region of their pain, their use of analgesics, their mood and mental health, and their overall quality of life. RESULTS: A total of 206 patients with a mean age of 56.24 ± 16.99 yrs were included in the study. Pain during COVID-19 was found to be higher compared with the preinfectious and postinfectious states. The most frequent painful areas were reported to be the neck and back before the infection, whereas the head and limbs during the infection. The most frequently used analgesic during infection was paracetamol. There was no relationship between the patients' pain and anxiety and depression; the quality of life was found to be worse in patients with persistent pain. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the head and limbs were the most common painful body regions during COVID-19. It was also found that pain can continue in the postinfection period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Myalgia/diagnosis , Pain Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Female , Headache/diagnosis , Humans , Low Back Pain/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Neck Pain/diagnosis , Physical Examination , Primary Health Care/methods , Retrospective Studies
5.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(4): 307-312, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1041878

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The clinical manifestations of COVID-19 range from mild symptoms to severe pneumonia and severe organ damage. When evaluated specifically for pain, the data so far have shown that myalgia, headache, and chest pain can be seen in patients at varying rates; myalgia and headache, especially, are among the initial symptoms. DESIGN: This retrospective chart review, followed by a descriptive survey design study, was carried out by examining patients afflicted with COVID-19. After discharge, patients were asked about the severity and the body region of their pain, their use of analgesics, their mood and mental health, and their overall quality of life. RESULTS: A total of 206 patients with a mean age of 56.24 ± 16.99 yrs were included in the study. Pain during COVID-19 was found to be higher compared with the preinfectious and postinfectious states. The most frequent painful areas were reported to be the neck and back before the infection, whereas the head and limbs during the infection. The most frequently used analgesic during infection was paracetamol. There was no relationship between the patients' pain and anxiety and depression; the quality of life was found to be worse in patients with persistent pain. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the head and limbs were the most common painful body regions during COVID-19. It was also found that pain can continue in the postinfection period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Myalgia/diagnosis , Pain Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Female , Headache/diagnosis , Humans , Low Back Pain/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Neck Pain/diagnosis , Physical Examination , Primary Health Care/methods , Retrospective Studies
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