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1.
Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther ; 38: 102743, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661892

ABSTRACT

Several oral lesions related to COVID-19 have been described in the scientific literature. The COVID-19 pandemic highlighs importance of supportive protocols, which can reduce the inflammation and aid in tissue repair in severe cases. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) alone or in combination with antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) can be used to manage orofacial lesions in confirmed cases of COVID-19. Here, we sought to describe the clinical presentation and specificities of three cases in which aPDT and PBMT were used to manage orofacial lesions in patients with COVID-19. The laser protocols were effective with improvement of the orofacial lesions within a few days.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents , COVID-19 , Low-Level Light Therapy , Photochemotherapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Photochemotherapy/methods , Photosensitizing Agents/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther ; 37: 102643, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531705

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Among the most common symptoms of COVID-19 is taste dysfunction, which has a ranging clinical presentation. As well as its pathophysiology remains to be unclear, there is not enough information about the efficacy and safety of the available treatments. This study aims to report a series of cases using PBMT for the management of COVID-19-related taste impairment. CASE SERIES: 8 female and 2 male patients sought medical help for taste impairment (either partially or completely) after COVID-19 infection. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) on the tongue mucosa was then proposed but with 3 different protocols. Taste perception at baseline and before every laser session was evaluated using a visual analog scale. Irrespective of the PBMT protocol, taste recovery was noted in all cases but with varying degrees of improvement. CONCLUSION: given the high prevalence rates of taste dysfunction in COVID-19 patients and the lack of information about the available treatments, PBMT seems to be a promising therapeutic modality but not dependent on the total number of laser sessions and the interval between them. The choice of the most suitable laser protocol as well as the knowledge of the exact photonic mechanisms, however, need to be better studied.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Low-Level Light Therapy , Photochemotherapy , Female , Humans , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , Male , Photochemotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Taste Disorders/etiology
3.
Lasers Med Sci ; 37(3): 1921-1929, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482226

ABSTRACT

We are currently facing a pandemic that continuously causes high death rates and has negative economic and psychosocial impacts. Therefore, this period requires a quick search for viable procedures that can allow us to use safe and non-invasive clinical tools as prophylactic or even adjuvant methods in the treatment of COVID-19. Some evidence shows that photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) can attenuate the inflammatory response and reduce respiratory disorders similar to acute lung injury (ALI), complications associated with infections, such as the one caused by the new Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of PBMT (infrared low-level laser therapy) on the treatment of ALI, one of the main critical complications of COVID-19 infection, in an experimental model in rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to three experimental groups (n = 8): control group (CG), controlled ALI (ALI), and acute lung injury and PBM (ALIP). For treatment, a laser equipment was used (808 nm; 30 mw; 1.68 J) applied at three sites (anterior region of the trachea and in the ventral regions of the thorax, bilaterally) in the period of 1 and 24 h after induction of ALI. For treatment evaluation, descriptive histopathological analysis, lung injury score, analysis of the number of inflammatory cells, and expression of interleukin 1 ß (IL-1ß) were performed. In the results, it was possible to observe that the treatment with PBMT reduced inflammatory infiltrates, thickening of the alveolar septum, and lung injury score when compared to the ALI group. In addition, PBMT showed lower immunoexpression of IL-1ß. Therefore, based on the results observed in the present study, it can be concluded that treatment with PBMT (infrared low-level laser therapy) was able to induce an adequate tissue response capable of modulating the signs of inflammatory process in ALI, one of the main complications of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Low-Level Light Therapy , Animals , COVID-19/radiotherapy , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , Lung/pathology , Male , Rats , Rats, Wistar , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Photochem Photobiol B ; 222: 112282, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347724

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidence suggests that blue light has the potential to inactivate viruses. Therefore, we investigated the effect of 405 nm, 410 nm, 425 nm and 450 nm pulsed blue light (PBL) on human alpha coronavirus HCoV-229 E and human beta coronavirus HCoV-OC43, using Qubit fluorometry and RT-LAMP to quantitate the amount of nucleic acid in irradiated and control samples. Like SARS-CoV-2, HCoV-229E and HCoV-OC43 are single stranded RNA viruses transmitted by air and direct contact; they have similar genomic sizes as SARS-CoV-2, and are used as surrogates for SARS-CoV-2. Irradiation was carried out either at 32.4 J cm-2 using 3 mW cm-2 irradiance or at 130 J cm-2 using 12 mW cm-2 irradiance. Results: (1) At each wavelength tested, PBL was antiviral against both coronaviruses. (2) 405 nm light gave the best result, yielding 52.3% (2.37 log10) inactivation against HCoV-OC43 (p < .0001), and a significant 1.46 log 10 (44%) inactivation of HCoV-229E (p < .01). HCoV-OC43, which like SARS-CoV-2 is a beta coronavirus, was more susceptible to PBL irradiation than alpha coronavirus HCoV-229E. The latter finding suggests that PBL is potentially antiviral against multiple coronavirus strains, and that, while its potency may vary from one virus to another, it seems more antiviral against beta coronaviruses, such as HCoV-OC43. (3) Further, the antiviral effect of PBL was better at a higher irradiance than a lower irradiance, and this indicates that with further refinement, a protocol capable of yielding 100% inactivation of viruses is attainable.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 229E, Human/radiation effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/radiation effects , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(9)2021 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224026

ABSTRACT

In recent decades, researchers around the world have been studying intensively how micro-organisms that are present inside living organisms could affect the main processes of life, namely health and pathological conditions of mind or body. They discovered a relationship between the whole microbial colonization and the initiation and development of different medical disorders. Besides already known probiotics, novel products such as postbiotics and paraprobiotics have been developed in recent years to create new non-viable micro-organisms or bacterial-free extracts, which can provide benefits to the host with additional bioactivity to probiotics, but without the risk of side effects. The best alternatives in the use of probiotics and postbiotics to maintain the health of the intestinal microbiota and to prevent the attachment of pathogens to children and adults are highlighted and discussed as controversies and challenges. Updated knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the balance between microbiota and immune system for the introspection on the gut-lung-brain axis could reveal the latest benefits and perspectives of applied photobiomics for health. Multiple interconditioning between photobiomodulation (PBM), probiotics, and the human microbiota, their effects on the human body, and their implications for the management of viral infectious diseases is essential. Coupled complex PBM and probiotic interventions can control the microbiome, improve the activity of the immune system, and save the lives of people with immune imbalances. There is an urgent need to seek and develop innovative treatments to successfully interact with the microbiota and the human immune system in the coronavirus crisis. In the near future, photobiomics and metabolomics should be applied innovatively in the SARS-CoV-2 crisis (to study and design new therapies for COVID-19 immediately), to discover how bacteria can help us through adequate energy biostimulation to combat this pandemic, so that we can find the key to the hidden code of communication between RNA viruses, bacteria, and our body.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , Probiotics/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Brain/immunology , Brain/radiation effects , COVID-19/radiotherapy , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/microbiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/radiotherapy , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/radiation effects , Humans , Lung/immunology , Lung/radiation effects , Metabolomics , Phototherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects
6.
Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther ; 33: 102196, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1051903

ABSTRACT

Many oral signs and symptoms related to the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have been reported; however, both prevalence and etiology are still undetermined. Since the clinical features of the oral lesions seen in COVID-19 are highly heterogeneous and the treatments differ considerably in the literature, the present study aimed to report a clinical case in which a combination of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) and photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) was used for extensive lip lesions in a patient suffering from COVID-19. Within 4 days and without any systemic drug administration, after two sessions of aPDT and one session of PBMT, the lip lesions were completely healed, and the patient recovered her orofacial functions satisfactorily. According to the current case report and taking into consideration the evident lack of information about many aspects of COVID-19 infection, this combination of phototherapy modalities seems to be a promising tool for managing COVID-19-related lip lesions; however, more studies are necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lip/drug effects , Lip/pathology , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , Photochemotherapy/methods , Female , Humans , Methylene Blue/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Photosensitizing Agents/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Photochem Photobiol B ; 213: 112083, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023667

ABSTRACT

In developing an effective clinical tool against COVID-19, we need to consider why SARS-CoV-2 infections develop along remarkably different trajectories: from completely asymptomatic to a severe course of disease. In this paper we hypothesize that the progressive exhaustion and loss of lymphocytes associated with severe stages of COVID-19 result from an intracellular energy deficit in an organism which has already been depleted by preexisting chronic diseases, acute psychological stress and the aging process. A bioenergetics view of COVID-19 immunopathology opens a new biophysical opportunity to enhance impaired immune function via proposed pathways of photomagnetic catalysis of ATP synthesis, regenerative photobiomodulation and the ultrasonic acceleration of cell restructuring. Moreover, we suggest that a coherent application of multiple biophysical radiances (coMra) may synergistically enhance energy-matter-information kinetics of basal self-regeneration of cells and thus improve immune function and accelerate recovery.


Subject(s)
Biophysical Phenomena/physiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Energy Metabolism/physiology , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , Ultrasonic Therapy/methods , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Low-Level Light Therapy/trends , Ultrasonic Therapy/trends
9.
Am J Case Rep ; 21: e926779, 2020 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with lung inflammation and cytokine storm. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) is a safe, non-invasive therapy with significant anti-inflammatory effects. Adjunct PBMT has been employed in treating patients with lung conditions. Human studies and experimental models of respiratory disease suggest PBMT reduces inflammation and promotes lung healing. This is the first time supportive PBMT was used in a severe case of COVID-19 pneumonia. CASE REPORT A 57-year-old African American man with severe COVID-19 received 4 once-daily PBMT sessions by a laser scanner with pulsed 808 nm and super-pulsed 905 nm modes for 28 min. The patient was evaluated before and after treatment via radiological assessment of lung edema (RALE) by CXR, pulmonary severity indices, blood tests, oxygen requirements, and patient questionnaires. Oxygen saturation (SpO2) increased from 93-94% to 97-100%, while the oxygen requirement decreased from 2-4 L/min to 1 L/min. The RALE score improved from 8 to 5. The Pneumonia Severity Index improved from Class V (142) to Class II (67). Additional pulmonary indices (Brescia-COVID and SMART-COP) both decreased from 4 to 0. CRP normalized from 15.1 to 1.23. The patient reported substantial improvement in the Community-Acquired Pneumonia assessment tool. CONCLUSIONS This report has presented supportive PBMT in a patient with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Respiratory indices, radiological findings, oxygen requirements, and patient outcomes improved over several days and without need for a ventilator. Future controlled clinical trials are required to evaluate the effects of PBMT on clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
African Americans , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/radiotherapy , Low-Level Light Therapy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/radiotherapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , United States/epidemiology
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