Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 68
Filter
1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 850533, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776068

ABSTRACT

Background: Although fatigue has been shown to be strongly associated with falls risk, very few studies have focused on its mechanism involved in community-dwelling older subjects. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between fatigue and falls risk and its internal mechanism by constructing a chain mediation model. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was adopted. A convenience sample of 270 older adults was recruited from July to October 2021 in an urban community, in Beijing, China. The participants completed the 14-item Fatigue Scale (FS-14), Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I), the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and Fall-Risk Self-Assessment Questionnaire (FRQ) to measure fatigue, falls efficacy, lower limb function and falls risk. The theory of unpleasant symptoms was used as a conceptual framework. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was utilized to test the hypothetical model. Results: The overall fit of final model was found to be satisfactory: χ2/df = 1.61, CFI = 0.971, TLI = 0.962, RMSEA = 0.049 (95% CI 0.030/0.066) and SRMR = 0.023. Fatigue had a direct effect on falls risk (ß = 0.559, S.E. = 0.089, 95% CI 0.380/0.731), and it also had indirect effects on falls risk (ß = 0.303, S.E. = 0.072, 95% CI 0.173/0.460) through mediating factors. Falls efficacy and lower limb function were the main mediating variables, and there was a chain mediating effect (ß = 0.015, S.E. = 0.010, 95% CI 0.003/0.046). Conclusions: Our study suggests that fatigue can influence falls risk among the elderly in China. There are many mediating paths between fatigue and falls risk. These results may help healthcare professionals to better understand the inherent relationship between fatigue and fall risk that may benefit older adults.


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls , Fatigue , Aged , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Lower Extremity , Postural Balance
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(2)2022 01 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633758

ABSTRACT

The available data from electroneurography (ENG) studies on the transmission of neural impulses in the motor fibers of upper and lower extremity nerves following neuromuscular functional electrical stimulation (NMFES) combined with kinesiotherapy in post-stroke patients during sixty-day observation do not provide convincing results. This study aims to compare the effectiveness of an NMFES of antagonistic muscle groups at the wrist and ankle and kinesiotherapy based mainly on proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF). An ENG was performed once in a group of 60 healthy volunteers and three times in 120 patients after stroke (T0, up to 7 days after the incident; T1, after 21 days of treatment; and T2, after 60 days of treatment); 60 subjects received personalized NMFES and PNF treatment (NMFES+K), while the other 60 received only PNF (K). An ENG studied peripheral (M-wave recordings), C8 and L5 ventral root (F-wave recordings) neural impulse transmission in the peroneal and the ulnar nerves on the hemiparetic side. Both groups statistically differed in their amplitudes of M-wave recording parameters after peroneal nerve stimulation performed at T0 and T2 compared with the control group. After 60 days of treatment, only the patients from the NMFES+K group showed significant improvement in M-wave recordings. The application of the proposed NMFES electrostimulation algorithm combined with PNF improved the peripheral neural transmission in peroneal but not ulnar motor nerve fibers in patients after ischemic stroke. Combined kinesiotherapy and safe, personalized, controlled electrotherapy after stroke give better results than kinesiotherapy alone.


Subject(s)
Electric Stimulation Therapy , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke Rehabilitation , Ankle , Electric Stimulation , Electric Stimulation Therapy/methods , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lower Extremity , Muscles , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Synaptic Transmission , Treatment Outcome , Wrist
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580767

ABSTRACT

The present study examined the effects of the lockdown period on basic anthropometric measures, countermovement jumping performance, skeletal muscle contractile properties derived from tensiomyography (TMG), injury incidence, and self-assessed general well-being in elite soccer players. A total of 266 players were assessed before (PRE) and 32 players were reassessed 11 days after (POST) the COVID-19 period. Significant changes in the TMG parameters were observed POST compared to PRE: contraction time (Tc) increased from 6% to 50% in vastus lateralis [VL] (p = 0.009) and biceps femoris [BF] (p < 0.001), respectively; whereas radial displacement (Dm) increased for 19% in BF (p = 0.036) and 17% in VL (p < 0.001), respectively. Jumping performance remained unchanged from PRE to POST In addition, athletes rated the lockdown period as a positive event and felt psychologically better during the lockdown, primarily because they spent more time with family members and friends. Although there were no differences in any of the variables describing lower limb muscle power following the two-month lockdown, the altered contractile properties of the assessed muscles suggest suboptimal conditioning of the football players.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Explosive Agents , Soccer , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Lower Extremity , Muscle Strength , Muscle, Skeletal , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 21(1): 592, 2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566507

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 and Fontan physiology have each been associated with an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), however little is known about the risks and potential consequences of having both. CASE PRESENTATION: A 51 year old male with tricuspid atresia status post Fontan and extracardiac Glenn shunt, atrial flutter, and sinus sick syndrome presented with phlegmasia cerulea dolens (PCD) of the left lower extremity in spite of supratherapeutic INR in the context of symptomatic COVID-10 pneumonia. He was treated with single session, catheter directed mechanical thrombectomy that was well-tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: This report of acute PCD despite therapeutic anticoagulation with a Vitamin K antagonist, managed with emergent mechanical thrombectomy, calls to attention the importance of altered flow dynamics in COVID positive patients with Fontan circulation that may compound these independent risk factors for developing deep venous thrombosis with the potential for even higher morbidity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fontan Procedure , Gangrene , Mechanical Thrombolysis , Postoperative Complications , Thrombophlebitis , Tricuspid Atresia , Warfarin/therapeutic use , Amputation/methods , Atrial Flutter/drug therapy , Atrial Flutter/etiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Fontan Procedure/adverse effects , Fontan Procedure/methods , Gangrene/etiology , Gangrene/surgery , Heart Defects, Congenital/surgery , Humans , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Lower Extremity/pathology , Lower Extremity/surgery , Male , Mechanical Thrombolysis/adverse effects , Mechanical Thrombolysis/methods , Middle Aged , Phlebography/methods , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/physiopathology , Postoperative Complications/surgery , Sick Sinus Syndrome/diagnosis , Sick Sinus Syndrome/etiology , Thrombophlebitis/diagnosis , Thrombophlebitis/etiology , Thrombophlebitis/surgery , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Treatment Outcome , Tricuspid Atresia/etiology , Tricuspid Atresia/surgery
5.
Br J Nurs ; 30(Sup20): S6, 2021 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534585
6.
Med Sci Sports Exerc ; 53(11): 2324-2332, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526675

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the effects of motor imagery (MI) training on strength and power performances of professional athletes during a period of detraining caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: Thirty male professional basketball players (age, 26.1 ± 6.2 yr) were randomly assigned to three counterbalanced groups: two MI training groups, who completed imagery training by mentally rehearsing upper and lower limb resistance training exercises loaded with either 85% of one repetition maximum (85%1RM) or optimum power loads (OPL), or a control group. For six consecutive weeks, although all groups completed two weekly sessions of high-intensity running, only the MI groups performed three additional MI sessions a week. Maximal strength and power output were measured through 1RM and OPL assessments in the back squat and bench press exercises with a linear positioning transducer. Vertical jump and throwing capabilities were assessed with the countermovement jump and the seated medicine ball throw tests, respectively. Kinesthetic and visual imagery questionnaires, and chronometry and rating of perceived effort scores were collected to evaluate MI vividness, MI ability, and perceived effort. RESULTS: Physical performances improved significantly following both MI protocols (range, ~2% to ~9%), but were reduced in the control group, compared with preintervention (P ≤ 0.016). Moreover, interactions (time-protocol) were identified between the two MI groups (P ≤ 0.001). Whereas the 85%1RM led to greater effects on maximal strength measures than the OPL, the latter induced superior responses on measures of lower limb power. These findings were mirrored by corresponding cognitive and psychophysiological responses. CONCLUSIONS: During periods of forced detraining, MI practice seems to be a viable tool to maintain and increase physical performance capacity among professional athletes.


Subject(s)
Athletic Performance/physiology , Imagery, Psychotherapy , Muscle Strength , Resistance Training/methods , Adult , COVID-19 , Humans , Lower Extremity/physiology , Male , Pandemics , Perception/physiology , Physical Exertion/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Upper Extremity/physiology
7.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 376, 2021 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There have been cases of minimal change disease (MCD) reported following previous vaccines. During the COVID-19 era, only 3 cases of new-onset MCD and a case of MCD relapse were reported following the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. We herein report the first case of MCD after receiving the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. CASE PRESENTATION: A 43-year-old man presented to hospital 3 weeks after receiving the first dose of the Moderna vaccine, with both bilateral lower extremities and scrotal edema. He initially developed a sudden-onset bilateral lower extremities swelling on day 7 post-vaccine. He, then, developed dyspnea and scrotal swelling over a time span of 2 weeks. On physical examination, his blood pressure was 150/92 mmHg. There was a decreased air entry at lung bases, bilateral lower extremities and scrotal edema. Labs revealed hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia and 15 g of proteinuria. His immunologic and serologic work up was negative. Renal biopsy showed concomitant MCD and IgA nephropathy. Patient was treated with oral steroids and had a good response; his edema resolved, serum albumin improved, and proteinuria decreased to 1 g within 2 weeks of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, MCD has not been previously reported after receiving the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. It remains unclear whether the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are associated with the development of MCD, or it coincided with the mass vaccination. Further studies are needed to determine the incidence of MCD post COVID-19 vaccines and the underlying pathophysiology of glomerular injury post vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Edema/etiology , Lower Extremity , Nephrosis, Lipoid/chemically induced , Scrotum , Adult , Dyspnea/etiology , Glomerulonephritis, IGA/chemically induced , Glomerulonephritis, IGA/complications , Glomerulonephritis, IGA/pathology , Humans , Hypoalbuminemia/etiology , Male , Nephrosis, Lipoid/complications , Nephrosis, Lipoid/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(9): 694-700, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480440

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Vascular Society of Great Britain and Ireland (VSGBI) Peripheral Arterial Disease Quality Improvement Framework (PAD QIF) stipulates targets for managing patients with chronic limb-threatening ischaemia (CLTI); however, it is unknown whether these are achievable. This survey aims to evaluate contemporary practice for managing CLTI in the UK. METHODS: A questionnaire was developed in conjunction with the VSGBI to survey the management of CLTI and canvass opinions on the PAD QIF. The survey was distributed to all consultant members of the VSGBI and through a targeted social media campaign. RESULTS: Forty-seven consultant vascular surgeons based at 36 arterial centres across the UK responded (response rate from arterial centres = 46%). Only 14.3% of centres provided outpatient consultation within the target of seven days from referral, with only one centre providing revascularisation within the target of seven days from consultation. For inpatient management, 31.6% provided surgical and 23.8% endovascular revascularisation within the target of three days from assessment. While 60% of participants believe the PAD QIF's 5-day 'admitted care' pathway is achievable, only 28.6% thought the 14-day 'non-admitted care' pathway was feasible. Challenges to meeting these targets include the availability of theatre space and angiography lists, and availability of outpatient appointments for patient assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The opinion of UK vascular surgeons indicates that achieving the targets of the PAD QIF represents a major challenge based upon current services. Adapting existing services with a greater focus on providing an 'urgent' model of care may help to potentially overcome these challenges.


Subject(s)
Ischemia/surgery , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Lower Extremity/surgery , Peripheral Arterial Disease/surgery , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Specialties, Surgical , Vascular Surgical Procedures , Chronic Disease , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Limb Salvage , United Kingdom
9.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(19)2021 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468448

ABSTRACT

Early and self-identification of locomotive degradation facilitates us with awareness and motivation to prevent further deterioration. We propose the usage of nine squat and four one-leg standing exercise features as input parameters to Machine Learning (ML) classifiers in order to perform lower limb skill assessment. The significance of this approach is that it does not demand manpower and infrastructure, unlike traditional methods. We base the output layer of the classifiers on the Short Test Battery Locomotive Syndrome (STBLS) test used to detect Locomotive Syndrome (LS) approved by the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA). We obtained three assessment scores by using this test, namely sit-stand, 2-stride, and Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale (GLFS-25). We tested two ML methods, namely an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) comprised of two hidden layers with six nodes per layer configured with Rectified-Linear-Unit (ReLU) activation function and a Random Forest (RF) regressor with number of estimators varied from 5 to 100. We could predict the stand-up and 2-stride scores of the STBLS test with correlation of 0.59 and 0.76 between the real and predicted data, respectively, by using the ANN. The best accuracies (R-squared values) obtained through the RF regressor were 0.86, 0.79, and 0.73 for stand-up, 2-stride, and GLFS-25 scores, respectively.


Subject(s)
Locomotion , Machine Learning , Feasibility Studies , Lower Extremity , Risk Assessment
10.
Vasc Endovascular Surg ; 56(2): 201-207, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443761

ABSTRACT

We present a 74-year-old gentleman, who presented with foot ischaemia requiring bilateral amputation in the absence of radiological signs of occlusive peripheral arterial disease. He was found to have COVID-19 pneumonitis and concurrent arterial and venous thromboemboli despite no initial respiratory symptoms or signs, nor pre-existing risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Patients who present with foot ischaemia with or without respiratory symptoms or signs warrant a high index of suspicion for COVID-19 infection, particularly in those with no predisposing risk factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Peripheral Arterial Disease , Venous Thromboembolism , Aged , Humans , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Ischemia/etiology , Lower Extremity , Male , Peripheral Arterial Disease/complications , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Toes , Treatment Outcome
11.
JBJS Rev ; 9(9)2021 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430597

ABSTRACT

¼: Telemedicine has become an emerging necessity in the practice of orthopaedic surgery following the paradigm shift that was brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. ¼: Physical examination is an integral component of orthopaedic care and plays a crucial role in diagnosis. ¼: Based on our experience and expert opinion in the literature, we recommend the following infrastructure for a virtual orthopaedic physical examination: a computing device with a functioning camera and high-definition input/output audio, a 720p (high-definition) display, a processing speed of 3.4 GHz, an internet connection speed range from 1 to 25 Mbps, adequate lighting, a steady camera that is positioned 3 to 6 ft (0.9 to 1.8 m) from the patient, a quiet environment for the examination, and clothing that exposes the area to be examined. ¼: When performing a virtual examination of the lower extremity, inspection, range of motion, and gait analysis can be easily translated by verbally instructing the patient to position his or her body or perform the relevant motion. Self-palpation accompanied by visual observation can be used to assess points of tenderness. Strength testing can be performed against gravity or by using household objects with known weights. Many special tests (e.g., the Thessaly test with knee flexion at 20° for meniscal tears) can also be translated to a virtual setting by verbally guiding patients through relevant positioning and motions. ¼: Postoperative wound assessment can be performed in the virtual setting by instructing the patient to place a ruler next to the wound for measuring the dimensions and using white gauze for color control. The wound can be visually assessed when the patient's camera or smartphone is positioned 6 to 18 in (15 to 46 cm) away and is held at a 45° angle to the incision.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedics/methods , Physical Examination/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Humans , Lower Extremity , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 72: 209-215, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385038

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Both arterial and venous thrombotic events of the extremities occur in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, but the etiology of these events remains unclear. This study sought to evaluate pathology specimens of COVID-19-positive patients postamputation, who were found to have Rutherford 3 acute limb ischemia requiring amputation. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of all vascular surgery emergency room and inpatient consultations in patients who presented to the Mount Sinai Health System from March 26, 2020, to May 10, 2020. Pathology specimens were examined using hematoxylin and eosin stain. The specimens were assessed for the following: inflammatory cells associated with endothelium/apoptotic bodies, mononuclear cells, small vessel congestion, and lymphocytic endotheliitis. Of the specimens evaluated, 2 patients with a known history of peripheral vascular disease were excluded. RESULTS: Inflammatory cells associated with endothelium/apoptotic bodies were seen in all 4 patients and in 4 of 5 specimens. Mononuclear cells were found in 2 of 4 patients. Small vessel congestion was seen in all patients. Lymphocytic endotheliitis was seen in 1 of 4 patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows endotheliitis in amputation specimens of four patients with COVID-19 disease and Rutherford Class 3 acute limb ischemia. The findings in these patients is more likely an infectious angiitis because of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amputation , COVID-19/complications , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Lower Extremity/surgery , Thrombosis/surgery , Thrombosis/virology , Acute Disease , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102204, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306924

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Identify the prevalence, risk factors and outcomes of lower extremity ischemic complications. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted by searching PubMed and SCOPUS databases for SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19 and peripheral arterial complications. RESULTS: Overall 476 articles were retrieved and 31 articles describing 133 patients were included. The mean age was 65.4 years. Pain and gangrene were the most common presentation. Hypertension (51.3%), diabetes (31.9%) and hypercholesterolemia (17.6%) were associated co-morbidities. Overall, 30.1% of patients died and amputation was required in 11.8% patients. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 patients with diabetes or hypertension are susceptible for lower limb complications and require therapeutic anti-coagulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetic Angiopathies , Hypertension , Aged , Amputation/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Diabetic Angiopathies/complications , Diabetic Angiopathies/diagnosis , Diabetic Angiopathies/epidemiology , Diabetic Angiopathies/therapy , Female , Gangrene/diagnosis , Gangrene/epidemiology , Gangrene/etiology , Gangrene/therapy , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/diagnosis , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy , Lower Extremity , Male , Middle Aged , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnosis , Peripheral Arterial Disease/epidemiology , Peripheral Arterial Disease/etiology , Peripheral Arterial Disease/therapy , Prevalence , Prognosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
14.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(7)2020 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291917
15.
Vasc Med ; 26(6): 613-623, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282193

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic's impact on vascular procedural volumes and outcomes has not been fully characterized. METHODS: Volume and outcome data before (1/2019 - 2/2020), during (3/2020 - 4/2020), and following (5/2020 - 6/2020) the initial pandemic surge were obtained from the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI). Volume changes were determined using interrupted Poisson time series regression. Adjusted mortality was estimated using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: The final cohort comprised 57,181 patients from 147 US and Canadian sites. Overall procedure volumes fell 35.2% (95% CI 31.9%, 38.4%, p < 0.001) during and 19.8% (95% CI 16.8%, 22.9%, p < 0.001) following the surge, compared with presurge months. Procedure volumes fell 71.1% for claudication (95% CI 55.6%, 86.4%, p < 0.001) and 15.9% for chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI) (95% CI 11.9%, 19.8%, p < 0.001) but remained unchanged for acute limb ischemia (ALI) when comparing surge to presurge months. Adjusted mortality was significantly higher among those with claudication (0.5% vs 0.1%; OR 4.38 [95% CI 1.42, 13.5], p = 0.01) and ALI (6.4% vs 4.4%; OR 2.63 [95% CI 1.39, 4.98], p = 0.003) when comparing postsurge with presurge periods. CONCLUSION: The first North American COVID-19 pandemic surge was associated with a significant and sustained decline in both elective and nonelective lower-extremity vascular procedural volumes. When compared with presurge patients, in-hospital mortality increased for those with claudication and ALI following the surge.


Subject(s)
Amputation , COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Peripheral Arterial Disease/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Limb Salvage , Lower Extremity , Pandemics , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnosis , Peripheral Arterial Disease/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
16.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(5): 639-345, 2021 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262631

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents an important clinical complication of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, and high plasma D-dimer levels could suggest a higher risk of hypercoagulability. We aimed to analyse if laboratory exams, risk assessment scores, comorbidity scores were useful in predicting the VTE in SARS-CoV-2 patients admitted in internal medicine (IM). We evaluated 49 older adults with suspected VTE analysing history and blood chemistry, besides we calculated the Padua Prediction Score, the modified early warning scoring (MEWS) and the modified Elixhauser index (mEI). All patients underwent venous color-doppler ultrasounds of the lower limbs. Out of the 49 patients enrolled (mean age 79.3±14 years), 10 (20.4%) had deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and they were more frequently female (80% vs 20%, p = 0.04). We could not find any association with the Padua Prediction Score, the MEWS, and the mEI. D-dimer plasma levels were also not associated with DVT. In elderly people hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2 infection hospitalized in IM, our data, although limited by the sample size, suggest that prediction and diagnosis of VTE is difficult, due to lack of precise biomarkers and scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Case-Control Studies , Early Warning Score , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Lower Extremity/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
17.
Semin Vasc Surg ; 34(2): 8-12, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240793

ABSTRACT

This literature review discusses the current evidence on acute limb ischemia (ALI) in patients with COVID-19. Throughout the pandemic, these patients have been at increased risk of arterial thrombotic events and subsequent mortality as a result of a hypercoagulable state. The exact mechanism of thrombosis is unknown; however arterial thrombosis may be due to invasion of endothelial cells via angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors, endothelial injury from inflammation, or even free-floating aortic thrombus. Multiple studies have been performed evaluating the medical and surgical management of these patients; the decision to proceed with operative intervention is dependent on the patient's clinical status as it relates to COVID-19 and morbidity of that disease. The interventions afforded typically include anticoagulation in patients undergoing palliation; alternatively, thrombectomy (endovascular and open) is utilized in other patients. There is a high risk of rethrombosis, despite anticoagulation, given persistent endothelial injury from the virus. Postoperative mortality can be high in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Ischemia/therapy , Ischemia/virology , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Thrombosis/therapy , Thrombosis/virology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Ischemia/diagnosis , Thrombectomy , Thrombosis/diagnosis
19.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251966, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236594

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs, using serial compression ultrasound (CUS) surveillance, in acutely ill patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to a non-ICU setting. METHODS: Multicenter, prospective study of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to Internal Medicine units. All patients were screened for DVT of the lower limbs with serial CUS. Anticoagulation was defined as: low dose (enoxaparin 20-40 mg/day or fondaparinux 1.5-2.5 mg/day); intermediate dose (enoxaparin 60-80 mg/day); high dose (enoxaparin 120-160 mg or fondaparinux 5-10 mg/day or oral anticoagulation). The primary end-point of the study was the diagnosis of DVT by CUS. RESULTS: Over a two-month period, 227 consecutive patients with moderate-severe COVID-19 pneumonia were enrolled. The incidence of DVT was 13.7% (6.2% proximal, 7.5% distal), mostly asymptomatic. All patients received anticoagulation (enoxaparin 95.6%) at the following doses: low 57.3%, intermediate 22.9%, high 19.8%. Patients with and without DVT had similar characteristics, and no difference in anticoagulant regimen was observed. DVT patients were older (mean 77±9.6 vs 71±13.1 years; p = 0.042) and had higher peak D-dimer levels (5403 vs 1723 ng/mL; p = 0.004). At ROC analysis peak D-dimer level >2000 ng/mL (AUC 0.703; 95% CI 0.572-0.834; p = 0.004) was the most accurate cut-off value able to predict DVT (RR 3.74; 95%CI 1.27-10, p = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of DVT in acutely ill patients with COVID-19 pneumonia is relevant. A surveillance protocol by serial CUS of the lower limbs is useful to timely identify DVT that would go otherwise largely undetected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Humans , Incidence , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Male , Middle Aged , Ultrasonography , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 192, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206456

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection is responsible for many complications, which can lead to a high risk of mortality in some patients. Among them are cardiovascular complications which are classified as the most severe. We report a case of a young woman, with no relevant pathological history, admitted for COVID-19 infection, complicated by myocarditis with severe ventricular dysfunction, cardiogenic shock and a large thrombosis into the left ventricle (LV) that was responsible for a left lower limb ischemia associated with a deep venous thrombosis of right lower limb.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Myocarditis/virology , Shock, Cardiogenic/virology , Thrombosis/virology , Female , Heart Ventricles/pathology , Heart Ventricles/virology , Humans , Ischemia/etiology , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Middle Aged , Venous Thrombosis/virology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL