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1.
Med Arch ; 76(2): 127-130, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1924541

ABSTRACT

Background: The dominant symptoms in the patient with COVID-19 are symptoms of the respiratory organ system such as cough, rhinorrhea, dan shortness of breathing. Nonetheless, some reports found involvement of another organ system, including the gastrointestinal system, cardiovascular system, central nervous system, urinary system, such as lower urinary tract symptoms. Hematuria related to infection of COVID-19 virus on adult and kids were reported. Urinary frequency related to infection of the covid-19 virus was also reported. However, the association between covid-19 infection and lower urinary symptoms was still unknown. Objective: This study aims to identify the effect of covid-19 infection on lower urinary tract symptoms manifestation on the patient with COVID-19 treated in Field Hospital. Methods: The design of this study is cross-sectional. After inclusion and exclusion criteria, the male and female patients were then asked based on question points from the International Prostate Score and latest condition related covid-19. In addition, we statistically analyzed the association and the effect between these two variables. Results: Six hundred and six COVID-19 confirmed patients were included in this study. The most frequent complaints of lower urinary tract symptoms were frequency. The severity of the covid-19 correlates with the lower urinary tracts symptoms score. Conclusion: The most common lower urinary tract symptoms are frequency, urgency, and nocturia. These lower urinary tract symptoms may increase in severity with the severity of the infection from COVID-19. The severity of COVID-19 has a significant effect on the increase in lower urinary tract symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Nocturia , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/etiology , Male , Nocturia/complications , Quality of Life , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 5739574, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854482

ABSTRACT

Aim: Through investigation and analysis of the course management of 314 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) during the COVID-19 pandemic, we expected to offer effective recommendations for the management of patients with BPH against the background of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We implemented telephone follow-ups of 314 patients with BPH who were diagnosed at the Urology Clinic of Xiangya Hospital of Central South University before January 24, 2020, and who were admitted to the hospital for reexamination after the epidemic was controlled in China, and we conducted research and analysis of their disease management during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: In the follow-up, we found 245 patients (79.3%) over 60 years of age and 187 patients (60.5%) with underlying disease. There were 47 patients (15.2%) who returned for consultation during the COVID-19 pandemic, and of these, 18 were admitted to the hospital for follow-up consultation, and 29 patients underwent consultation via the internet or telephone. Eleven patients underwent surgery during the pandemic, and of these, three experienced emergency surgery. We encountered 65 patients (24.4%) who self-administered medications irregularly and 54 patients (20.3%) who self-medicated and adjusted the dosage and drug types themselves. There were 302 patients (97.7%) who wished to be reexamined during the COVID-19 pandemic. In terms of treatment, the proportion of patients "awaiting observation" declined from 13.9% to 4.4%, and the proportion of patients "awaiting surgery" increased from 4.9% to 16.4%. Using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) scale, the percentage of patients with moderate-to-severe symptoms increased from 79.9% to 90.1%, and the proportion with a quality of life (QOL) score ≥ 5 rose from 82.5% to 88.9%. The proportions of patients exhibiting storage, voiding, and postmicturition symptoms in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) increased from 77.3%, 21.7%, and 18.8% to 91.9%, 27.5%, and 25.5%, respectively; those manifesting hematuria and urinary retention increased from 0.9% and 0.6% to 2.3% and 1.7%, respectively; those with a prostate specific antigen (PSA) > 4 ng/ml rose from 10.0% to 15.1%; patients with a maximum flow rate (Qmax) < 15 ml/s increased from 82.5% to 92.3%, and the proportion with a Qmax < 10 ml/s increased from 8.7% to 15.4%; the individuals with a prostate volume > 30 ml increased from 94.1% to 97.0%; the percentage of men with a bladder residual urine volume > 10 ml was augmented from 81.6% to 89.3%, and patients with prostate nodules on physical examination were elevated from 1.0% to 1.7%. We uncovered no prostate cancer in patients, and the proportion of patients administered the combination drug increased from 78.9% to 91.2%. Compared with patients receiving online or telephone consultations, patients undergoing reexamination at the hospital were better controlled. When we conducted a survey of whether patients chose to go to a public or private hospital for follow-up, we found that 46.6% of the patients chose to go to a private medical institution. Conclusions: COVID-19 greatly affected the treatment of patients with BPH. When conditions permit, we recommend that patients first consider going to the hospital for evaluation; however, when this is not possible, medical institutions should provide telephone or online consultation for patients with BPH. Surgical treatment should also be arranged for those in need as soon as possible to avoid delaying the patient's treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Prostatic Hyperplasia , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , Prostatic Hyperplasia/epidemiology , Prostatic Hyperplasia/therapy , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies
3.
Arch Ital Urol Androl ; 94(1): 46-50, 2022 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771329

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronaviruses (CoVs) are a group of RNA viruses involved in several human diseases affecting respiratory, enteric, hepatic, and neurological systems. COVID-19 was identified in 2020 and was named SARS-CoV-2. To limit worldwide contagion, many countries instituted a lockdown, which conducted to disruption of routine life. In fact, pandemic was associated with several stresses among population, such as loss of employment, deaths of family members, friends, or colleagues, financial insecurity, and isolation. This led to long-lasting psychosocial effects as anxiety and depression, increasing the prevalence of stress and traumarelated disorders in the population. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between lower urinary tracts symptoms (LUTS) and stress/depressive symptoms during COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An anonymous cross-sectional webbased survey (comprehending anthropometric data, education level, occupation status, smoking and alcohol habits, current therapies, quarantine and COVID-19 infection status) was conducted from March to May 2020 in Italy. LUTS were examined through National Institute of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and Genitourinary Pain Index (GUPI). Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) was utilized to evaluate depressive and anxiety symptoms. Non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis H Test was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: A total of 356 out of 461 subjects fully completed the survey, with a response rate of 77.2%. Data showed that subjects involved in economic difficulties, quarantine measures or with increased HDRS reported a significative statistic worsened urinary symptoms (H(3) = 11.731, p = 0.008), quality of life, (H(3) = 10.301, p = 0.016), total NIH-CPSI/GUPI score (H(3) = 42.150, p = 0.000), and quality of life (H(3) = 48.638, p = 0.000). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 pandemic provoked several alterations in everyday life. Although general lockdown, quarantine and social distancing have been necessary to prevent virus spreading, this had long term effects on all population in terms of mental and physical health. NIH-CPSI and GUPI scores increased linearly with stress and anxiety levels measured at HDRS, confirming worse LUTS in subjects who suffered anxiety and stress from COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/epidemiology , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/etiology , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Low Urin Tract Symptoms ; 14(4): 301-304, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741474

ABSTRACT

CASE: Since the declaration of COVID-19 as a pandemic, other unexpected symptoms related to the infection besides the respiratory system have been reported. Although a few case reports have revealed that adult patients with COVID-19 also complained of urinary frequency and nocturia, the exact pathophysiology is still unclear. In this case series, we present three children aged 14 to 17 years with urodynamically proven lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) following COVID-19. OUTCOME: None of the patients had constipation or bowel disorder before the diagnosis of COVID-19. In addition, neurological examination and related imaging revealed no signs of etiological factors. The median time from diagnosis of COVID-19 infection to the onset of lower urinary tract symptoms was 3 months. Incomplete bladder emptying/urinary retention supported by increased bladder compliance, high post-micturition residual urine volumes, and absence of detrusor pressure increase during the voiding phase in the pressure flow study (acontractile detrusor in two patients and hypocontractile detrusor in one patient) were observed. CONCLUSION: We observed that LUTD (eg, incomplete bladder emptying, urinary retention) can be prominent some time after the diagnosis of COVID-19. Even though psychogenic or neurogenic causes may not be excluded completely, clinicians should be aware of a recent COVID-19 infection in children with sudden-onset LUTD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Urinary Retention , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Humans , Urinary Bladder , Urinary Retention/etiology , Urination/physiology , Urodynamics
5.
Curr Opin Urol ; 32(2): 141-145, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592072

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has caused a crisis in the entire healthcare system since its emergence. The urgency and priority of various diseases have impacted the medical and surgical treatment in this period. We aim to review the impact of COVID-19 on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and management. RECENT FINDINGS: There may be a relationship between COVID-19 and de novo or increased LUTS. Patients with LUTS should also be evaluated for COVID-19. Management of diseases has varied during the COVID-19 due to the density of the pandemic. Virtual consultations can mitigate patients who are postponed or cancelled, such as patients with LUTS. Patients suffering voiding dysfunction may manage with oral medications such as alpha blocker and 5-alpha reductase inhibitor via telemedicine. Minimally invasive procedures with a low risk of complications and a short hospitalization time should be considered in complicated cases such as the inability to catheterize. SUMMARY: Telemedicine should be implemented on managements of noncomplicated LUTS and voiding dysfunction. Each centre can schedule its LUTS management approach according to the density of pandemic. Virtual consultations need to be developed to compete with face-to-face consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/diagnosis , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/epidemiology , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/etiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Low Urin Tract Symptoms ; 14(1): 41-46, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373890

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We assess the effect of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Moreover, we delineate risk factors for urine retention in such patients. METHODS: All COVID-19 infected males were expeditiously evaluated. All enrolled patients were assessed using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), uroflowmetry, and pelvi-abdominal ultrasonography for prostate volume and postvoiding residual urine (PVR) estimation. RESULTS: Fifty patients, who were diagnosed with BPH, were enrolled. The mean age (±SD) was 62.64 ± 7.69. In the pre- and post-COVID-19 group, the mean (±SD) IPSS was 13.42 ± 4.32 and 26.62 ± 5.77, respectively (P < .001), while PVR was 90.40 ± 32.75 and 185.42 ± 73.42, respectively (P < .001), and maximum flow rate was 14.40 ± 2.75 and 10.74 ± 3.43, respectively (P < .004). After infection with COVID-19, 13 (26%) patients were managed by urethral catheter fixation owing to urine retention. On bivariate analysis, age, diabetes, large prostate on digital rectal examination, alpha-blocker monotherapy, microscopic hematuria, positive urine culture, and pre-COVID-19 IPSS were significantly correlated with urine retention (P < .001, P = .01, P < .001, P = .06, P < .001, P = .04, and P < .001, respectively). On multivariate analysis, age, pre-COVID-19 IPSS, and positive urine culture were the independent predictors of urine retention (P = .05, P < .001, and P = .01, respectively). CONCLUSION: LUTS in BPH patients were significantly affected by COVID-19. COVID-19 increases IPSS leading to a change in the treatment modality of BPH. On multivariate analysis, age, pre-COVID-19 IPSS, and positive urine culture were the independent predictors of urine retention post COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Prostatic Hyperplasia , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/epidemiology , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/etiology , Male , Pandemics , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Urology ; 153: 11-13, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324333

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To quantify and describe urologic adverse events and symptoms after vaccination with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We queried the FDA Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) for all reported symptoms following the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines as of February 12th, 2021. All urologic symptoms were isolated and the reported adverse events associated with each symptom were reviewed. RESULTS: Out of 15,785 adverse event reports, only 0.7% (113) described urologic symptoms. A total of 156 urologic symptoms were described amongst the 113 adverse event reports. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was responsible for 61% of these reports and the Moderna vaccine was responsible for 39%. These symptoms were grouped into five different categories: Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (n = 34, 22%), Hematuria (n = 22, 14%), Urinary Infection (n = 41, 26%), Skin and/or Soft Tissue (n = 16, 10%), and Other (n = 43, 28%). The median age of the patients reporting urologic symptoms was 63 years (IQR 44-79, Range: 19-96) and 54% of the patients were female. CONCLUSION: Urologic symptoms reported after COVID-19 vaccination are extremely rare. Given the common prevalence of many of these reported symptoms in the general population, there does not appear to be a correlation between vaccination and urologic symptoms, but as the vaccination criteria expands, further monitoring of the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Urologic Diseases/chemically induced , Adult , Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hematuria/chemically induced , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/chemically induced , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration , Urinary Tract Infections/chemically induced , Young Adult
9.
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis ; 25(1): 27-38, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To explore the potential mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 in targeting the prostate gland, leading to exacerbation of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) symptoms and greater risks of BPH complications such as acute urinary retention. METHODS: A categorized and comprehensive search in the literature has been conducted by 10 April 2021 using international databases including PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane Library in line with the PRISMA guidelines recommendations. PICO strategy was used to formulate the research question. The following terms were used: urology, COVID-19, coronavirus, BPH, inflammation, androgen receptors, LUTS, IPSS, PSA, and SARS-CoV-2 or a combination of them. Studies with irrelevant purposes and duplicates were excluded. The selected studies were performed on humans and published in English. RESULTS: The research revealed 89 articles. After title screening and considering exclusion criteria, 52 papers were included for the systematic review. BPH is a common condition affecting older men. SARS-CoV-2 infects the host cell by binding to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). A hyperactivated RAS system during infection with SARS-CoV-2 may lead to activation of pro-inflammatory pathways and increased cytokine release. Thus, this virus can lead to exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and trigger inflammatory processes in the prostate gland. Since androgen receptors (AR) play an important role in the BPH pathophysiology and infection with SARS-CoV-2 may be androgen-mediated, BPH progression and its related symptoms can be a complication of COVID-19 through AR involvement and metabolic disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the current findings, SARS-CoV-2 can possibly damage the prostate and worsen BPH and its related LUTS through ACE2 signaling, AR-related mechanisms, inflammation, and metabolic derangement. We encourage future studies to investigate the possible role of COVID-19 in the progression of BPH-related LUTS and examine the prostatic status in susceptible patients with relevant available questionnaires (e.g., IPSS) and serum biomarkers (e.g., PSA).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Prostatic Hyperplasia , Prostatic Neoplasms , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/epidemiology , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/etiology , Male , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , Prostatic Hyperplasia/diagnosis , Prostatic Hyperplasia/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Receptors, Androgen , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
10.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(3)2021 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115111

ABSTRACT

We describe a case of retrovesical liposarcoma in a male patient with concurrent COVID-19. A 50-year-old man had lower urinary tract symptoms and dull pain along his right gluteus. Due to COVID-19 infection, management was delayed. During self-isolation, the patient developed urinary retention and his pain level was an eight on the Visual Analogue Scale. A urinary catheter and an epidural catheter were inserted without any difficulty. Abdominal-pelvic MRI revealed a retrovesical mass suspected of liposarcoma with clear borders from surrounding organs. Following two consecutive negative SARS-CoV-2 PCR tests, we proceeded with surgery. Histopathology was dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Postoperatively, the patient suffered reactivation of COVID-19, and he was eventually discharged after two consecutive negative results on the PCR test on Post Operative Day (POD)-10. Retrovesical dedifferentiated liposarcoma is rare and considered as high-grade liposarcoma. Although surgery may exacerbate COVID-19 infection, surgical resection of symptomatic high-grade sarcoma is prioritised and performed as soon as no infection detected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Liposarcoma , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Pelvic Neoplasms , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Urinary Retention , COVID-19/therapy , Chemoradiotherapy, Adjuvant/methods , Dissection/methods , Humans , Liposarcoma/pathology , Liposarcoma/physiopathology , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/diagnosis , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Grading , Pelvic Neoplasms/pathology , Pelvic Neoplasms/physiopathology , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome , Urinary Retention/diagnosis , Urinary Retention/etiology
11.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(6): e14110, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096804

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic is the most important public health problem in 2020. Millions of people have been infected or died because of the outbreak. We know the common symptoms of the disease such as fever and cough. However, all symptoms and features of COVID-19 are still were not known. We aimed to evaluate the change in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) after COVID-19 in men. METHODS: We prospectively assessed 94 patients with COVID-19 during hospitalisation. The patients were divided into two groups according to age, that being over and under age 50. IPSS scores of all patients were enrolled. Additionally, we compared the scores with pre-COVID-19 values. RESULTS: LUTS scores were found to be increased in elderly patients. Additionally, the severity of the disease did not correlate with LUTS scores. CONCLUSION: LUTS may be one of the symptoms of COVID-19 in some patients. Elderly patients with increased LUTS should be evaluated for COVID-19 when the reason unclear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Aged , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(3): e13850, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939744

ABSTRACT

AIM: To show if lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) could be symptoms of COVID-19 with validated questionnaires. METHODS: The 96 COVID-19 patients who were hospitalised at a tertiary centre were collected retrospectively. After the exclusion criteria, 46 patients consisted the study population. All patients then fill formed the International Prostate Symptom Score and Urinary Symptom Profile respectively. All patients responded to these questions for the three period. RESULTS: Twenty-seven female (58.6%) and 19 male (41.4%) COVID-19 patients answered the questions. In the male patients, while there were no statistically significant differences in the total IPSS, the voiding IPSS score, and quality of life between the three periods (P = .148; P = .933, P = .079, respectively), the storage IPSS scores had a significant difference between the three periods (P = .05). In female patients, low stream scores were similar between the three periods (P = .368). The scores of stress incontinence and an overactive bladder had a significant difference between the three periods (P = .05 and P = .05). CONCLUSION: LUTS, especially storage symptoms, might be one of the initial symptoms of COVID-19 and the clinicians should evaluate LUTS with other known symptoms of the virus when a patient is suspected of having COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Female , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/diagnosis , Male , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Urol Int ; 104(11-12): 853-858, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-748834

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate the effectiveness of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), which occur as a natural result of aging and androgen exposure, in predicting disease prognosis in male patients diagnosed with COVID-19. METHODS: The study was planned prospectively. The study included 63 male patients over 40 years of age diagnosed with COVID-19. The patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 based on the results of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction tests of oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal swabs obtained as per the World Health Organization guidelines. The presence of LUTS was assessed by the International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS), a subjective assessment, and the I-PSS was filled for the patients included in the study. The patients were divided into three groups based on their scores in the I-PSS survey: group 1: mild (0-7), group 2: moderate (8-19), and group 3: severe (20-35). The data of all three groups were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: In the assessment performed between the groups, it was identified that for patients in group 3, the length of hospital stay was longer, intensive care requirement was more frequent, and their mortality rates were numerically higher. In the evaluation made regarding the time to intensive care admittance, this was identified to be the shortest in group 3. CONCLUSION: As a result of our study, we think that in patients with COVID-19, BPH-related LUTS can guide clinicians in predicting prognosis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prostatic Hyperplasia/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Adult , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Eur Urol Focus ; 6(5): 1049-1057, 2020 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597672

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has changed standard urology practice around the world. The situation is affecting not only uro-oncological patients but also patients with benign and disabling conditions who are suffering delays in medical attention that impact their quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To propose, based on expert advice and current evidence where available, a strategy to reorganize female and functional urological (FFU) activity (diagnosis and treatment). EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: The present document is based on a narrative review of the limited data available in the urological literature on SARS-Cov-2 and the experience of FFU experts from several countries around the world. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: In all the treatment schemes proposed in the literature on the COVID-19 pandemic, FFU surgery is not adequately covered and usually grouped into the category that is not urgent or can be delayed, but in a sustained pandemic scenario there are cases that cannot be delayed that should be considered for surgery as a priority. The aim of this document is to provide a detailed management plan for noninvasive and invasive FFU consultations, investigations, and operations. A classification of FFU surgical activity by indication and urgency is proposed, as well as recommendations adopted from the literature for good surgical practice and by surgical approach in FFU in the COVID-19 era. CONCLUSIONS: Functional, benign, and pelvic floor conditions have often been considered suitable for delay in challenging times. The long-term implications of this reduction in functional urology clinical activity are currently unknown. This document will help functional urology departments to reorganize their activity to best serve their patients. PATIENT SUMMARY: Many patients will suffer delays in urology treatment because of COVID-19, with consequent impairment of their physical and psychological health and deterioration of their quality of life. Efforts should be made to minimize the burden for this patient group, without endangering patients and health care workers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Urologic Diseases/diagnosis , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/methods , Ambulatory Care , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cystitis, Interstitial/diagnosis , Cystitis, Interstitial/therapy , Disease Management , Female , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/diagnosis , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/therapy , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Urinary Incontinence/diagnosis , Urinary Incontinence/therapy , Urinary Retention/diagnosis , Urinary Retention/therapy , Urinary Tract Infections/diagnosis , Urinary Tract Infections/therapy , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Vesicovaginal Fistula/diagnosis , Vesicovaginal Fistula/therapy
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