Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 42
Filter
1.
BMC Res Notes ; 15(1): 176, 2022 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1849780

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Exercise has been demonstrated to be beneficial for improving physical capacity and quality of life in people with scleroderma, although knowledge of its impact on the respiratory system is limited. This study evaluated the impact of therapist-oriented home rehabilitation (TOHR) on impulse oscillometry (IOS) and lung ultrasound (LUS) findings in patients with scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD). RESULTS: Twelve women with scleroderma underwent spirometry, IOS, and LUS before and after performing TOHR. Regarding spirometry, a normal pattern and restrictive damage were observed in five (41.7%) and seven (58.3%) participants pre-TOHR and post-TOHR, respectively. For IOS, an abnormal result was detected in nine (75%) pre-TOHR participants and six (50%) post-TOHR participants. Heterogeneity of resistance between 4-20 Hz (R4-R20) > 20% of the predicted value was observed in eight (66.7%) pre-TOHR participants and three (25%) post-TOHR participants (P = 0.031). An abnormal LUS result was observed in nine (75%) participants both pre-TOHR and post-TOHR. The main change observed was B-lines > 2, which was noted in nine (75%) participants both pre-TOHR and post-TOHR. Our findings suggest that TOHR for women with scleroderma-associated ILD improves the resistance and reactance measured by IOS, including small airway disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT05041868 Registered on: 13th September 2021.


Subject(s)
Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Quality of Life , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Oscillometry , Pilot Projects , Spirometry
5.
Int J Infect Dis ; 116: 255-257, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757401

ABSTRACT

Messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines that protect against COVID-19 are widely used in many countries owing to their high efficacy and safety profiles. Recently, few severe adverse events, such as anaphylaxis and myocarditis, were reported in healthy individuals. The safety of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines has not been adequately studied in patients with interstitial lung disease. We report 2 cases of acute exacerbation of preexisting interstitial pneumonia associated with mRNA COVID-19 vaccination. In both cases, lung disease was stable before the vaccination. Initial responses to steroid therapy were unfavorable, and intravenous cyclophosphamide was administered in both cases. Both patients were diagnosed with vaccine-related exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia based on laboratory results, radiologic features, and the observed clinical course, which lacked other causative events. We suggest that clinicians should note the possibility of acute exacerbation of pneumonia after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination and carefully monitor patients with interstitial lung disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
6.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(5): e32, 2022 Feb 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674310

ABSTRACT

Dermatomyositis (DM) is one of the uncommon multi-organ idiopathic inflammatory myopathies that has been reported following the hepatitis B, Influenza, tetanus toxoid, H1N1, and BCG vaccines. However, an association with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine is yet to be reported. In this case, we present the case of a 43-year-old Asian Indian female who was diagnosed with DM 10 days after receiving the second dosage of BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccination, in the absence of any additional triggering factors. The diagnosis was established based on physical examination, serological antibodies, magnetic resonance imaging of the muscles, skin biopsy, and electromyography. She received standard treatment for DM, including oral high doses of prednisolone, hydroxychloroquine, mycophenolate, and physiotherapy. The treatment successfully reversed skin changes and muscle weakness. This is the first reported case of classic DM complicated by interstitial lung disease following COVID-19 vaccination. More clinical and functional studies are needed to elucidate this association. Clinicians should be aware of this unexpected adverse event following COVID-19 vaccination and arrange for appropriate management.


Subject(s)
/adverse effects , Dermatomyositis/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Dermatomyositis/etiology , Electromyography , Female , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Muscle, Skeletal/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Skin/pathology , Vaccination/adverse effects
7.
Chest ; 161(2): e91-e96, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664780

ABSTRACT

CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old South African man with a medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, seizure disorder, OSA, and latent TB presented to the ER with gradually progressive dyspnea over months. He also reported occasional dry cough and fatigue at presentation but denied fever, chills, chest pain, leg swelling, palpitations, or lightheadedness. He was treated with a course of levofloxacin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia as an outpatient without improvement and had tested negative for COVID-19. He denied occupational or environmental exposures or sick contacts, though he had traveled back to South Africa 1 year before presentation. He had complex partial seizures for the past 22 years, which had been well controlled on phenytoin (300 mg daily). His other home medications included dulaglutide, sertraline, and atorvastatin and had no recent changes. He quit smoking 30 years ago after smoking one pack per day for 10 years.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Drug Substitution/methods , Lacosamide/administration & dosage , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Lung , Phenytoin , Seizures/drug therapy , Biopsy/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diagnosis, Differential , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/etiology , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/physiopathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Phenytoin/administration & dosage , Phenytoin/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/complications , Seizures/diagnosis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Treatment Outcome , Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Blockers/administration & dosage , Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Blockers/adverse effects
13.
Dis Markers ; 2021: 5536360, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378085

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of red blood cell distribution width (RDW) in patients with connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 213 CTD-ILD patients and 97 CTD patients without ILD from February 2017 to February 2020. Hospital and office records were used as data sources. CTD-ILD patients were followed up. RESULTS: Patients with CTD-ILD had significantly higher RDW than those with CTD without ILD (p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of RDW for discriminating CTD-ILD from CTD without ILD was 0.64 (95% CI: 0.57-0.70, p < 0.001). The cutoff value of RDW for discriminating CTD-ILD from CTD without ILD was 13.95% with their corresponding specificity (55.9%) and sensitivity (70.1%). Correlation analyses showed that the increased RDW was significantly correlated with decreased DLCO%predicted (r = -0.211, p = 0.002). Cox multiple regression analysis indicated that RDW (HR = 1.495, p < 0.001) was an independent factor in the survival of CTD-ILD. The best cutoff value of RDW to predict the survival of patients with CTD-ILD was 14.05% (AUC = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.72-0.84, p < 0.001). The log-rank test showed a significant difference in survival between the two groups (RDW > 14.05% and RDW < 14.05%). CONCLUSION: RDW was higher in CTD-ILD patients and had a negative correlation with DLCO%predicted. RDW may be an important serum biomarker for severity and prognosis of patients with CTD-ILD.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , Connective Tissue Diseases/complications , Erythrocyte Indices , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/blood , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate
14.
Respir Investig ; 59(5): 675-678, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333726

ABSTRACT

We conducted a study to examine the effect of COVID-19 on the acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (AE-ILD) early in the COVID-19 epidemic (January 1-April 30, 2020). An online questionnaire survey was conducted, which was completed by 134 hospitals. During this period, 854 patients with AE-ILD (including 12 cases of COVID-AE-idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis were hospitalized at 128 hospitals. In comparison, the total number of AE-ILD hospitalizations during the same period in 2019 was 894. The number of hospitalizations increased at 17 hospitals, decreased at 27, and remained the same at 88 hospitals in 2020 compared to the same period in 2019. In 2020, COVID-19-related acute exacerbations had a significantly worse prognosis than non-COVID-19-related acute exacerbations in both 30-day and 90-day mortality. Because the prognosis of AE-ILD associated with COVID-19 is extremely poor, prevention of COVID-19 is especially important for patients with ILD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Acute Disease , COVID-19/complications , Disease Progression , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/epidemiology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 61(4): 1600-1609, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328934

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify the main CT features that may help in distinguishing a progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to SSc from COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This multicentric study included 22 international readers grouped into a radiologist group (RADs) and a non-radiologist group (nRADs). A total of 99 patients, 52 with COVID-19 and 47 with SSc-ILD, were included in the study. RESULTS: Fibrosis inside focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in the upper lobes; fibrosis in the lower lobe GGOs; reticulations in lower lobes (especially if bilateral and symmetrical or associated with signs of fibrosis) were the CT features most frequently associated with SSc-ILD. The CT features most frequently associated with COVID- 19 pneumonia were: consolidation (CONS) in the lower lobes, CONS with peripheral (both central/peripheral or patchy distributions), anterior and posterior CONS and rounded-shaped GGOs in the lower lobes. After multivariate analysis, the presence of CONs in the lower lobes (P < 0.0001) and signs of fibrosis in GGOs in the lower lobes (P < 0.0001) remained independently associated with COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD, respectively. A predictive score was created that was positively associated with COVID-19 diagnosis (96.1% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity). CONCLUSION: CT diagnosis differentiating between COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD is possible through a combination of the proposed score and radiologic expertise. The presence of consolidation in the lower lobes may suggest COVID-19 pneumonia, while the presence of fibrosis inside GGOs may indicate SSc-ILD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Scleroderma, Systemic , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Testing , Fibrosis , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/complications , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Scleroderma, Systemic/complications , Scleroderma, Systemic/diagnostic imaging , Scleroderma, Systemic/pathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
16.
Front Immunol ; 12: 686699, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311375

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a respiratory tract infection caused by the new virus SARS-CoV-2. The acute phase of the infection may in certain individuals be followed by another longer phase of disease (long COVID) of unknown etiology probably associated in certain cases with autoimmune activation. It has been shown that COVID-19 can trigger autoantibody production and in genetically predisposed patients may cause the onset or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases. We are reporting a case of mild COVID-19 infection complicated by autoantibody production and cutaneous and gastrointestinal symptoms and subsequently diagnosed with systemic sclerosis (SSc). A 47-year-old man with no history of any autoimmune diseases and in good health became sick together with his family on the 12th of November with mild symptoms: tiredness, fever, cough, and sore throat. Oropharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2 tested positive. He was isolated at home and did not require hospitalization. Three weeks later he presented with clinical manifestation compatible with suspicion of SSc. He briefly presented with skin rush, periorbital edema and conjunctivitis, vomiting, dysphagia, burning sensation in the skin, above all in the fingertips and around the mouth, puffy fingers, Raynaud's phenomenon, pain at the fingertip of the middle finger where a depressed area was noticed without a clear ulceration. ANA showed a strongly positive nucleolar pattern. Anti-PM/Scl 75 and PM/Scl 100 resulted positive. High-resolution computed tomography (HCRT) showed early stage of interstitial lung disease (ILD). The patient was diagnosed with SSc based on the persistence of autoantibodies and the clinical and radiological pictures according to the ACR/EULAR classification (scores: puffy finger, 2; ILD, 2; Raynaud's phenomenon, 3; SSc related antibodies, 3; total 10). There are several cases described in the medical literature of possible new onset of SLE after COVID-19 infection. This is the first case that describes a possible new onset of SSc. Conclusion: SARS-CoV-2 may trigger systemic sclerosis.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/etiology , Autoimmunity , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Scleroderma, Systemic/etiology , Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Proton Pump Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Raynaud Disease/diagnosis , Raynaud Disease/etiology , Scleroderma, Systemic/drug therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
18.
Ann Diagn Pathol ; 53: 151744, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227970

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Assess the pathologic changes in the lungs of COVID-19 decedents and correlate these changes with demographic data, clinical course, therapies, and duration of illness. METHODS: Lungs of 12 consecutive COVID-19 decedents consented for autopsy were evaluated for gross and histopathologic abnormalities. A complete Ghon "en block" dissection was performed on all cases; lung weights and gross characteristics recorded. Immunohistochemical studies were performed to characterize lymphocytic infiltrates and to assess SARS-CoV-2 capsid protein. RESULTS: Two distinct patterns of pulmonary involvement were identified. Three of 12 cases demonstrated a predominance of acute alveolar damage (DAD) while 9 of 12 cases demonstrated a marked increase in intra-alveolar macrophages in a fashion resembling desquamative interstitial pneumonia or macrophage activation syndrome (DIP/MAS). Two patterns were correlated solely with a statistically significant difference in the duration of illness. The group exhibiting DAD had duration of illness of 5.7 days while the group with DIP/MAS had duration of illness of 21.5 days (t-test p = 0.014). CONCLUSIONS: The pulmonary pathology of COVID-19 patients demonstrates a biphasic pattern, an acute phase demonstrating DAD changes while the patients with a more prolonged course exhibit a different pattern that resembles DIP/MAS-like pattern. The potential mechanisms and clinical significance are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Immunohistochemistry/methods , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/pathology , Lung/pathology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/pathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Capsid Proteins/metabolism , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/virology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Lymphocytes/pathology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/etiology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/virology , Macrophages/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Alveoli/immunology , Pulmonary Alveoli/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sick Leave
19.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 18(5): 799-806, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219727

ABSTRACT

Rationale: The natural history of recovery from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remains unknown. Because fibrosis with persistent physiological deficit is a previously described feature of patients recovering from similar coronaviruses, treatment represents an early opportunity to modify the disease course, potentially preventing irreversible impairment.Objectives: Determine the incidence of and describe the progression of persistent inflammatory interstitial lung disease (ILD) following SARS-CoV-2 when treated with prednisolone.Methods: A structured assessment protocol screened for sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonitis. Eight hundred thirty-seven patients were assessed by telephone 4 weeks after discharge. Those with ongoing symptoms had outpatient assessment at 6 weeks. Thirty patients diagnosed with persistent interstitial lung changes at a multidisciplinary team meeting were reviewed in the interstitial lung disease service and offered treatment. These patients had persistent, nonimproving symptoms.Results: At 4 weeks after discharge, 39% of patients reported ongoing symptoms (325/837) and were assessed. Interstitial lung disease, predominantly organizing pneumonia, with significant functional deficit was observed in 35/837 survivors (4.8%). Thirty of these patients received steroid treatment, resulting in a mean relative increase in transfer factor following treatment of 31.6% (standard deviation [SD] ± 27.6, P < 0.001), and forced vital capacity of 9.6% (SD ± 13.0, P = 0.014), with significant symptomatic and radiological improvement.Conclusions: Following SARS-CoV-2 pneumonitis, a cohort of patients are left with both radiological inflammatory lung disease and persistent physiological and functional deficit. Early treatment with corticosteroids was well tolerated and associated with rapid and significant improvement. These preliminary data should inform further study into the natural history and potential treatment for patients with persistent inflammatory ILD following SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , COVID-19/complications , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Lung , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/physiopathology , Lung/virology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/physiopathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL