Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 174
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
2.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is an urgent need for new antivirals with powerful therapeutic potential and tolerable side effects. METHODS: Here, we tested the antiviral properties of interferons (IFNs), alone and with other drugs in vitro. RESULTS: While IFNs alone were insufficient to completely abolish replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), IFNα, in combination with remdesivir, EIDD-2801, camostat, cycloheximide, or convalescent serum, proved to be more effective. Transcriptome and metabolomic analyses revealed that the IFNα-remdesivir combination suppressed SARS-CoV-2-mediated changes in Calu-3 cells and lung organoids, although it altered the homeostasis of uninfected cells and organoids. We also demonstrated that IFNα combinations with sofosbuvir, telaprevir, NITD008, ribavirin, pimodivir, or lamivudine were effective against HCV, HEV, FLuAV, or HIV at lower concentrations, compared to monotherapies. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our results indicated that IFNα can be combined with drugs that affect viral RNA transcription, protein synthesis, and processing to make synergistic combinations that can be attractive targets for further pre-clinical and clinical development against emerging and re-emerging viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Cell Line , Drug Synergism , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Metabolome/drug effects , Organoids , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Transcriptome/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Viruses/classification , Viruses/drug effects
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22195, 2021 11 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514424

ABSTRACT

To initiate SARS-CoV-2 infection, the Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) on the viral spike protein must first bind to the host receptor ACE2 protein on pulmonary and other ACE2-expressing cells. We hypothesized that cardiac glycoside drugs might block the binding reaction between ACE2 and the Spike (S) protein, and thus block viral penetration into target cells. To test this hypothesis we developed a biochemical assay for ACE2:Spike binding, and tested cardiac glycosides as inhibitors of binding. Here we report that ouabain, digitoxin, and digoxin, as well as sugar-free derivatives digitoxigenin and digoxigenin, are high-affinity competitive inhibitors of ACE2 binding to the Original [D614] S1 and the α/ß/γ [D614G] S1 proteins. These drugs also inhibit ACE2 binding to the Original RBD, as well as to RBD proteins containing the ß [E484K], Mink [Y453F] and α/ß/γ [N501Y] mutations. As hypothesized, we also found that ouabain, digitoxin and digoxin blocked penetration by SARS-CoV-2 Spike-pseudotyped virus into human lung cells, and infectivity by native SARS-CoV-2. These data indicate that cardiac glycosides may block viral penetration into the target cell by first inhibiting ACE2:RBD binding. Clinical concentrations of ouabain and digitoxin are relatively safe for short term use for subjects with normal hearts. It has therefore not escaped our attention that these common cardiac medications could be deployed worldwide as inexpensive repurposed drugs for anti-COVID-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiotonic Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects , A549 Cells , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Digitoxin/pharmacology , Digoxin/pharmacology , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Ouabain/pharmacology , Protein Binding/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 656419, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506563

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) is the global health problem with the second highest number of deaths from a communicable disease after COVID-19. Although TB is curable, poor health infrastructure, long and grueling TB treatments have led to the spread of TB pandemic with alarmingly increasing multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB prevalence. Alternative host modulating therapies can be employed to improve TB drug efficacies or dampen the exaggerated inflammatory responses to improve lung function. Here, we investigated the adjunct therapy of natural immune-modulatory compound berberine in C57BL/6 mouse model of pulmonary TB. Berberine treatment did not affect Mtb growth in axenic cultures; however, it showed increased bacterial killing in primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. Ad libitum berberine administration was beneficial to the host in combination with rifampicin and isoniazid. Berberine adjunctive treatment resulted in decreased lung pathology with no additive or synergistic effects on bacterial burdens in mice. Lung immune cell flow cytometry analysis showed that adjunctive berberine treatment decreased neutrophil, CD11b+ dendritic cell and recruited interstitial macrophage numbers. Late onset of adjunctive berberine treatment resulted in a similar phenotype with consistently reduced numbers of neutrophils both in lungs and the spleen. Together, our results suggest that berberine can be supplemented as an immunomodulatory agent depending on the disease stage and inflammatory status of the host.


Subject(s)
Antitubercular Agents/therapeutic use , Berberine/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Isoniazid/therapeutic use , Rifampin/therapeutic use , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Animals , Antitubercular Agents/pharmacology , Berberine/pharmacology , Cytokines/immunology , Dendritic Cells/drug effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Isoniazid/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Mice, Inbred C3H , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/growth & development , Neutrophils/drug effects , Neutrophils/immunology , Rifampin/pharmacology , Spleen/drug effects , Spleen/immunology , Spleen/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/immunology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/pathology
6.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(43)2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493345

ABSTRACT

The host cell serine protease TMPRSS2 is an attractive therapeutic target for COVID-19 drug discovery. This protease activates the Spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and of other coronaviruses and is essential for viral spread in the lung. Utilizing rational structure-based drug design (SBDD) coupled to substrate specificity screening of TMPRSS2, we have discovered covalent small-molecule ketobenzothiazole (kbt) TMPRSS2 inhibitors which are structurally distinct from and have significantly improved activity over the existing known inhibitors Camostat and Nafamostat. Lead compound MM3122 (4) has an IC50 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration) of 340 pM against recombinant full-length TMPRSS2 protein, an EC50 (half-maximal effective concentration) of 430 pM in blocking host cell entry into Calu-3 human lung epithelial cells of a newly developed VSV-SARS-CoV-2 chimeric virus, and an EC50 of 74 nM in inhibiting cytopathic effects induced by SARS-CoV-2 virus in Calu-3 cells. Further, MM3122 blocks Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) cell entry with an EC50 of 870 pM. MM3122 has excellent metabolic stability, safety, and pharmacokinetics in mice, with a half-life of 8.6 h in plasma and 7.5 h in lung tissue, making it suitable for in vivo efficacy evaluation and a promising drug candidate for COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Benzothiazoles/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Oligopeptides/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Animals , Benzamidines/chemistry , Benzothiazoles/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Drug Design , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/virology , Esters/chemistry , Guanidines/chemistry , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/virology , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Oligopeptides/pharmacokinetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Serine Endopeptidases/drug effects , Serine Endopeptidases/ultrastructure , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Substrate Specificity/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects
7.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 731974, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485049

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is causing a worldwide epidemic. It spreads very fast and hits people of all ages, especially patients with underlying diseases such as diabetes. In this review, we focus on the influences of diabetes on the outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the involved mechanisms including lung dysfunction, immune disorder, abnormal expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), overactivation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, and increased furin level. On the other hand, SARS-CoV-2 may trigger the development of diabetes. It causes the damage of pancreatic ß cells, which is probably mediated by ACE2 protein in the islets. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 may aggravate insulin resistance through attacking other metabolic organs. Of note, certain anti-diabetic drugs (OADs), such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activator and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, have been shown to upregulate ACE2 in animal models, which may increase the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, Metformin, as a first-line medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), may be a potential drug benefiting diabetic patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, probably via a suppression of mTOR signaling together with its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrosis function in lung. Remarkably, another kind of OADs, dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor, may also exert beneficial effects in this respect, probably via a prevention of SARS-CoV-2 binding to cells. Thus, it is of significant to identify appropriate OADs for the treatment of diabetes in the context of SARS-CoV-2 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors/pharmacology , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 730022, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468343

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary surfactant is a complex and highly surface-active material. It covers the alveolar epithelium and consists of 90% lipids and 10% proteins. Pulmonary surfactant lipids together with pulmonary surfactant proteins facilitate breathing by reducing surface tension of the air-water interface within the lungs, thereby preventing alveolar collapse and the mechanical work required to breathe. Moreover, pulmonary surfactant lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol, and pulmonary surfactant proteins, such as surfactant protein A and D, participate in the pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Emerging data have shown that pulmonary surfactant lipids modulate the inflammatory response and antiviral effects in some respiratory viral infections, and pulmonary surfactant lipids have shown promise for therapeutic applications in some respiratory viral infections. Here, we briefly review the composition, antiviral properties, and potential therapeutic applications of pulmonary surfactant lipids in respiratory viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Lipids/therapeutic use , Lung/drug effects , Pulmonary Surfactants/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lipids/adverse effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Pulmonary Surfactants/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 718136, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468341

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a receptor for the spike protein of SARS-COV-2 that allows viral binding and entry and is expressed on the surface of several pulmonary and non-pulmonary cell types, with induction of a "cytokine storm" upon binding. Other cell types present the receptor and can be infected, including cardiac, renal, intestinal, and endothelial cells. High ACE2 levels protect from inflammation. Despite the relevance of ACE2 levels in COVID-19 pathogenesis, experimental studies to comprehensively address the question of ACE2 regulations are still limited. A relevant observation from the clinic is that, besides the pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-1ß, the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 is also elevated in worse prognosis patients. This could represent somehow a "danger signal", an alarmin from the host organism, given the immuno-regulatory properties of the cytokine. Here, we investigated whether IL-10 could increase ACE2 expression in the lung-derived Calu-3 cell line. We provided preliminary evidence of ACE2 mRNA increase in cells of lung origin in vitro, following IL-10 treatment. Endothelial cell infection by SARS-COV-2 is associated with vasculitis, thromboembolism, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We confirmed ACE2 expression enhancement by IL-10 treatment also on endothelial cells. The sartans (olmesartan and losartan) showed non-statistically significant ACE2 modulation in Calu-3 and endothelial cells, as compared to untreated control cells. We observed that the antidiabetic biguanide metformin, a putative anti-inflammatory agent, also upregulates ACE2 expression in Calu-3 and endothelial cells. We hypothesized that IL-10 could be a danger signal, and its elevation could possibly represent a feedback mechanism fighting inflammation. Although further confirmatory studies are required, inducing IL-10 upregulation could be clinically relevant in COVID-19-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and vasculitis, by reinforcing ACE2 levels.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/enzymology , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Interleukin-10/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/enzymology , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/immunology , Humans , Lung/enzymology , Lung/immunology , Metformin/pharmacology , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Up-Regulation
10.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e922281, 2020 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453382

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a sudden and serious disease with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) is a novel target for inflammatory disease, and ibudilast (IBU), a PDE4 inhibitor, inhibits inflammatory response. Our study investigated the effect of IBU on the pathogenesis of neonatal ARDS and the underlying mechanism related to it. MATERIAL AND METHODS Western blotting was performed to analyze the expression levels of PDE4, CXCR4, SDF-1, CXCR5, CXCL1, inflammatory cytokines, and proteins related to cell apoptosis. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe the pathological morphology of lung tissue. Pulmonary edema score was used to assess the degree of lung water accumulation after pulmonary injury. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-alpha, IL-1ß, IL-6, and MCP-1) in serum. TUNEL assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. RESULTS Increased expression of PDE4 was observed in an LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model, and IBU ameliorated LPS-induced pathological manifestations and pulmonary edema in lung tissue. In addition, IBU attenuated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by inactivating the chemokine axis in the LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model. Finally, IBU significantly reduced LPS-induced cell apoptosis in lung tissue. CONCLUSIONS IBU, a PDE4 inhibitor, protected against ARDS by interfering with pulmonary inflammation and apoptosis. Our findings provide a novel and promising strategy to regulate pulmonary inflammation in ARDS.


Subject(s)
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4/metabolism , Inflammation/drug therapy , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyridines/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/drug therapy , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Apoptosis/drug effects , Apoptosis/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Injections, Intraperitoneal , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Mice , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/pathology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
11.
Lipids Health Dis ; 20(1): 126, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448237

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). At present, the COVID-19 has been prevalent worldwide for more than a year and caused more than four million deaths. Liver injury was frequently observed in patients with COVID-19. Recently, a new definition of metabolic dysfunction associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) was proposed by a panel of international experts, and the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 has been actively investigated. Several previous studies indicated that the patients with MAFLD had a higher prevalence of COVID-19 and a tendency to develop severe type of respiratory infection, and others indicated that liver injury would be exacerbated in the patients with MAFLD once infected with COVID-19. The mechanism underlying the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 infection has not been thoroughly investigated, and recent studies indicated that multifactorial mechanisms, such as altered host angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor expression, direct viral attack, disruption of cholangiocyte function, systemic inflammatory reaction, drug-induced liver injury, hepatic ischemic and hypoxic injury, and MAFLD-related glucose and lipid metabolic disorders, might jointly contribute to both of the adverse hepatic and respiratory outcomes. In this review, we discussed the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 based on current available literature, and summarized the recommendations for clinical management of MAFLD patients during the pandemic of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/complications , Hypoxia/complications , Liver/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Age Factors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/drug therapy , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/pathology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Dipeptides/therapeutic use , Gene Expression Regulation , Glucose/metabolism , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Liver/drug effects , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/drug therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/virology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 120, 2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440900

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since fall 2019, SARS-CoV-2 spread world-wide, causing a major pandemic with estimated ~ 220 million subjects affected as of September 2021. Severe COVID-19 is associated with multiple organ failure, particularly of lung and kidney, but also grave neuropsychiatric manifestations. Overall mortality reaches > 2%. Vaccine development has thrived in thus far unreached dimensions and will be one prerequisite to terminate the pandemic. Despite intensive research, however, few treatment options for modifying COVID-19 course/outcome have emerged since the pandemic outbreak. Additionally, the substantial threat of serious downstream sequelae, called 'long COVID' and 'neuroCOVID', becomes increasingly evident. Among candidates that were suggested but did not yet receive appropriate funding for clinical trials is recombinant human erythropoietin. Based on accumulating experimental and clinical evidence, erythropoietin is expected to (1) improve respiration/organ function, (2) counteract overshooting inflammation, (3) act sustainably neuroprotective/neuroregenerative. Recent counterintuitive findings of decreased serum erythropoietin levels in severe COVID-19 not only support a relative deficiency of erythropoietin in this condition, which can be therapeutically addressed, but also made us coin the term 'hypoxia paradox'. As we review here, this paradox is likely due to uncoupling of physiological hypoxia signaling circuits, mediated by detrimental gene products of SARS-CoV-2 or unfavorable host responses, including microRNAs or dysfunctional mitochondria. Substitution of erythropoietin might overcome this 'hypoxia paradox' caused by deranged signaling and improve survival/functional status of COVID-19 patients and their long-term outcome. As supporting hints, embedded in this review, we present 4 male patients with severe COVID-19 and unfavorable prognosis, including predicted high lethality, who all profoundly improved upon treatment which included erythropoietin analogues. SHORT CONCLUSION: Substitution of EPO may-among other beneficial EPO effects in severe COVID-19-circumvent downstream consequences of the 'hypoxia paradox'. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial for proof-of-concept is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Erythropoietin/genetics , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Lung/drug effects , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Erythropoietin/analogs & derivatives , Erythropoietin/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/genetics , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Pandemics , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
13.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5552, 2021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434105

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition caused by the extreme release of inflammatory mediators into the blood in response to infection (e.g., bacterial infection, COVID-19), resulting in the dysfunction of multiple organs. Currently, there is no direct treatment for sepsis. Here we report an abiotic hydrogel nanoparticle (HNP) as a potential therapeutic agent for late-stage sepsis. The HNP captures and neutralizes all variants of histones, a major inflammatory mediator released during sepsis. The highly optimized HNP has high capacity and long-term circulation capability for the selective sequestration and neutralization of histones. Intravenous injection of the HNP protects mice against a lethal dose of histones through the inhibition of platelet aggregation and migration into the lungs. In vivo administration in murine sepsis model mice results in near complete survival. These results establish the potential for synthetic, nonbiological polymer hydrogel sequestrants as a new intervention strategy for sepsis therapy and adds to our understanding of the importance of histones to this condition.


Subject(s)
Hydrogels/therapeutic use , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use , Sepsis/drug therapy , Animals , Blood Platelets/drug effects , Cell Adhesion , Cell Survival/drug effects , Disease Models, Animal , Histones/antagonists & inhibitors , Histones/metabolism , Histones/toxicity , Hydrogels/chemistry , Hydrogels/metabolism , Hydrogels/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Nanoparticles/metabolism , Platelet Aggregation/drug effects , Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry , Polyethylene Glycols/metabolism , Polyethylene Glycols/pharmacology , Polyethylene Glycols/therapeutic use , Protein Binding , Sepsis/mortality , Survival Rate
14.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 18085, 2021 09 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402129

ABSTRACT

Effective vaccines are slowing the COVID-19 pandemic, but SARS-CoV-2 will likely remain an issue in the future making it important to have therapeutics to treat patients. There are few options for treating patients with COVID-19. We show probenecid potently blocks SARS-CoV-2 replication in mammalian cells and virus replication in a hamster model. Furthermore, we demonstrate that plasma concentrations up to 50-fold higher than the protein binding adjusted IC90 value are achievable for 24 h following a single oral dose. These data support the potential clinical utility of probenecid to control SARS-CoV-2 infection in humans.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Lung/drug effects , Probenecid/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Lung/virology , Vero Cells
15.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 105, 2021 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403209

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccination programs have been launched worldwide to halt the spread of COVID-19. However, the identification of existing, safe compounds with combined treatment and prophylactic properties would be beneficial to individuals who are waiting to be vaccinated, particularly in less economically developed countries, where vaccine availability may be initially limited. METHODS: We used a data-driven approach, combining results from the screening of a large transcriptomic database (L1000) and molecular docking analyses, with in vitro tests using a lung organoid model of SARS-CoV-2 entry, to identify drugs with putative multimodal properties against COVID-19. RESULTS: Out of thousands of FDA-approved drugs considered, we observed that atorvastatin was the most promising candidate, as its effects negatively correlated with the transcriptional changes associated with infection. Atorvastatin was further predicted to bind to SARS-CoV-2's main protease and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and was shown to inhibit viral entry in our lung organoid model. CONCLUSIONS: Small clinical studies reported that general statin use, and specifically, atorvastatin use, are associated with protective effects against COVID-19. Our study corroborrates these findings and supports the investigation of atorvastatin in larger clinical studies. Ultimately, our framework demonstrates one promising way to fast-track the identification of compounds for COVID-19, which could similarly be applied when tackling future pandemics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Atorvastatin/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Lung/drug effects , Organoids/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Atorvastatin/chemistry , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Line , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Doxycycline/pharmacology , Drug Approval , Drug Repositioning , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Lung/virology , Models, Biological , Molecular Docking Simulation , Organoids/virology , Raloxifene Hydrochloride/chemistry , Raloxifene Hydrochloride/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Trifluoperazine/chemistry , Trifluoperazine/pharmacology , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration , Vesiculovirus/genetics , Virus Internalization/drug effects
16.
J Virol ; 95(22): e0112621, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398575

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged at the end of 2019 and has been responsible for the still ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Prophylactic vaccines have been authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the prevention of COVID-19. Identification of SARS-CoV-2-neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is important to assess vaccine protection efficacy, including their ability to protect against emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VoC). Here, we report the generation and use of a recombinant (r)SARS-CoV-2 USA/WA1/2020 (WA-1) strain expressing Venus and an rSARS-CoV-2 strain expressing mCherry and containing mutations K417N, E484K, and N501Y found in the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the spike (S) glycoprotein of the South African (SA) B.1.351 (beta [ß]) VoC in bifluorescent-based assays to rapidly and accurately identify human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) able to neutralize both viral infections in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, our bifluorescent-based system accurately recapitulated findings observed using individual viruses. Moreover, fluorescent-expressing rSARS-CoV-2 strain and the parental wild-type (WT) rSARS-CoV-2 WA-1 strain had similar viral fitness in vitro, as well as similar virulence and pathogenicity in vivo in the K18 human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) transgenic mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. We demonstrate that these new fluorescent-expressing rSARS-CoV-2 can be used in vitro and in vivo to easily identify hMAbs that simultaneously neutralize different SARS-CoV-2 strains, including VoC, for the rapid assessment of vaccine efficacy or the identification of prophylactic and/or therapeutic broadly NAbs for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection. IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2 is responsible of the COVID-19 pandemic that has warped daily routines and socioeconomics. There is still an urgent need for prophylactics and therapeutics to treat SARS-CoV-2 infections. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using bifluorescent-based assays for the rapid identification of hMAbs with neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2, including VoC in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, results obtained with these bifluorescent-based assays recapitulate those observed with individual viruses, demonstrating their feasibility to rapidly advance our understanding of vaccine efficacy and to identify broadly protective human NAbs for the therapeutic treatment of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Neutralization Tests/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Genes, Reporter , Humans , Luminescent Proteins/genetics , Luminescent Proteins/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Lung/virology , Mice , Mutation , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Load/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
17.
Front Immunol ; 12: 709861, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394760

ABSTRACT

Background: Immune hyperactivity is an important contributing factor to the morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 infection. Nasal administration of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody downregulates hyperactive immune responses in animal models of autoimmunity through its immunomodulatory properties. We performed a randomized pilot study of fully-human nasal anti-CD3 (Foralumab) in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 to determine if its immunomodulatory properties had ameliorating effects on disease. Methods: Thirty-nine outpatients with mild to moderate COVID-19 were recruited at Santa Casa de Misericordia de Santos in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Patients were randomized to three cohorts: 1) Control, no Foralumab (n=16); 2) Nasal Foralumab (100ug/day) given for 10 consecutive days with 6 mg dexamethasone given on days 1-3 (n=11); and 3) Nasal Foralumab alone (100ug/day) given for 10 consecutive days (n=12). Patients continued standard of care medication. Results: We observed reduction of serum IL-6 and C-reactive protein in Foralumab alone vs. untreated or Foralumab/Dexa treated patients. More rapid clearance of lung infiltrates as measured by chest CT was observed in Foralumab and Foralumab/Dexa treated subjects vs. those that did not receive Foralumab. Foralumab treatment was well-tolerated with no severe adverse events. Conclusions: This pilot study suggests that nasal Foralumab is well tolerated and may be of benefit in treatment of immune hyperactivity and lung involvement in COVID-19 disease and that further studies are warranted.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pneumonia/therapy , Administration, Intranasal , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunity/drug effects , Interleukin-6/blood , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pilot Projects , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Young Adult
18.
Respir Care ; 66(1): 113-119, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Low airway surface pH is associated with many airway diseases, impairs antimicrobial host defense, and worsens airway inflammation. Inhaled Optate is designed to safely raise airway surface pH and is well tolerated in humans. Raising intracellular pH partially prevents activation of SARS-CoV-2 in primary normal human airway epithelial (NHAE) cells, decreasing viral replication by several mechanisms. METHODS: We grew primary NHAE cells from healthy subjects, infected them with SARS-CoV-2 (isolate USA-WA1/2020), and used clinical Optate at concentrations used in humans in vivo to determine whether Optate would prevent viral infection and replication. Cells were pretreated with Optate or placebo prior to infection (multiplicity of infection = 1), and viral replication was determined with plaque assay and nucleocapsid (N) protein levels. Healthy human subjects also inhaled Optate as part of a Phase 2a safety trial. RESULTS: Optate almost completely prevented viral replication at each time point between 24 h and 120 h, relative to placebo, on both plaque assay and N protein expression (P < .001). Mechanistically, Optate inhibited expression of major endosomal trafficking genes and raised NHAE intracellular pH. Optate had no effect on NHAE cell viability at any time point. Inhaled Optate was well tolerated in 10 normal subjects, with no change in lung function, vital signs, or oxygenation. CONCLUSIONS: Inhaled Optate may be well suited for a clinical trial in patients with pulmonary SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, it is vitally important for patient safety that formulations designed for inhalation with regard to pH, isotonicity, and osmolality be used. An inhalational treatment that safely prevents SARS-CoV-2 viral replication could be helpful for treating patients with pulmonary SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Glycine/pharmacology , Isotonic Solutions/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication/drug effects , Administration, Inhalation , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Cells, Cultured/drug effects , Glycine/administration & dosage , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration/drug effects , Isotonic Solutions/administration & dosage
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 705080, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389187

ABSTRACT

Respiratory viral infections have been a long-standing global burden ranging from seasonal recurrences to the unexpected pandemics. The yearly hospitalizations from seasonal viruses such as influenza can fluctuate greatly depending on the circulating strain(s) and the congruency with the predicted strains used for the yearly vaccine formulation, which often are not predicted accurately. While antiviral agents are available against influenza, efficacy is limited due to a temporal disconnect between the time of infection and symptom development and viral resistance. Uncontrolled, influenza infections can lead to a severe inflammatory response initiated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or host-derived danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that ultimately signal through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Overall, these pathogen-host interactions result in a local cytokine storm leading to acute lung injury (ALI) or the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with concomitant systemic involvement and more severe, life threatening consequences. In addition to traditional antiviral treatments, blocking the host's innate immune response may provide a more viable approach to combat these infectious pathogens. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic illustrates a critical need for novel treatments to counteract the ALI and ARDS that has caused the deaths of millions worldwide. This review will examine how antagonizing TLR4 signaling has been effective experimentally in ameliorating ALI and lethal infection in challenge models triggered not only by influenza, but also by other ALI-inducing viruses.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/immunology , Acute Lung Injury/prevention & control , Acute Lung Injury/virology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 5890, 2021 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387466

ABSTRACT

To circumvent time-consuming clinical trials, testing whether existing drugs are effective inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2, has led to the discovery of Remdesivir. We decided to follow this path and screened approved medications "off-label" against SARS-CoV-2. Fluoxetine inhibited SARS-CoV-2 at a concentration of 0.8 µg/ml significantly in these screenings, and the EC50 was determined with 387 ng/ml. Furthermore, Fluoxetine reduced viral infectivity in precision-cut human lung slices showing its activity in relevant human tissue targeted in severe infections. Fluoxetine treatment resulted in a decrease in viral protein expression. Fluoxetine is a racemate consisting of both stereoisomers, while the S-form is the dominant serotonin reuptake inhibitor. We found that both isomers show similar activity on the virus, indicating that the R-form might specifically be used for SARS-CoV-2 treatment. Fluoxetine inhibited neither Rabies virus, human respiratory syncytial virus replication nor the Human Herpesvirus 8 or Herpes simplex virus type 1 gene expression, indicating that it acts virus-specific. Moreover, since it is known that Fluoxetine inhibits cytokine release, we see the role of Fluoxetine in the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients of risk groups.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Fluoxetine/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Fluoxetine/therapeutic use , Humans , Lung/pathology , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Virus Replication/drug effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...