Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 937
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
J Tradit Chin Med ; 41(6): 982-984, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614424

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study the possible role of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) of Huangqi (Radix Astragali Mongolici), Gancao (Radix Glycyrrhizae), Jinyinhua (Flos Lonicerae), and Lianqiao (Fructus Forsythiae Suspensae) in absorption of lung lesions in Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. METHODS: A cohort of COVID-19 cases was recruited. During hospitalization, chest computed tomographic (CT) scan and real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test were performed every three days. Comparison was held (Western Medicine, WM vs WM plus TCM) on absorption of lung lesions, time interval from admission to negative test result of RT-PCR (ATN), and medical expense. Multivariate cox regression models were built to identify the possible prognostic factor of delayed absorption of lung lesion. RESULTS: The medical expenditure (1163 ± 379 vs 1137 ± 498, P = 0.863) and ATN (13 ± 4 vs 10 ± 4, P = 0.055) were comparable between cases treated with WM plus TCM and cases only received WM. Multivariate cox regression model showed that cases receiving extra TCM had lower risk of delayed absorption of lung lesions [Hazard ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence Interval (0.06, 0.96), P = 0.043]. CONCLUSION: Compared to WM, the treatment of WM plus TCM facilitates the recovery of pulmonary infiltration on COVID-19 cases without significantly increasing medical expense.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Lung/pathology , Adult , Astragalus propinquus , Female , Forsythia , Glycyrrhiza , Hospitalization , Humans , Lonicera , Lung/virology , Male , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Middle Aged , Plant Extracts
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(47): e27980, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604285

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Pulmonary fibrosis is an infamous sequela of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia leading to long-lasting respiratory problems and activity limitations. Pulmonary rehabilitation is beneficial to improve the symptoms of lung fibrosis. We experienced a post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis patient who received a structured exercise-based pulmonary rehabilitation program. PATIENT CONCERNS: This article presents a case of successful pulmonary rehabilitation of a patient with post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis. The patient could not cut off the oxygen supplement even after a successful recovery from COVID-19. DIAGNOSIS: Diagnosis of COVID-19 was based on the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Pulmonary fibrosis was diagnosed by patient's complaint, clinical appearance, and computed tomography (CT) on chest. INTERVENTION: The patient underwent ten sessions of exercise-based rehabilitation program according to Consensus Document on Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Korea, 2015. OUTCOME: On the 8th day, he could cut off the oxygen supplementation and complete the one-hour exercise without oxygen. He was discharged after completing the 10-session program without any activity limitations. LESSONS: Exercise-based pulmonary rehabilitation will help the post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis patients. This case suggested the importance of pulmonary rehabilitation program to the post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Fibrosis/rehabilitation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 420, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585885

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is identified as a zoonotic disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, which also can cross-transmit to many animals but not mice. Genetic modifications of SARS-CoV-2 or mice enable the mice susceptible to viral infection. Although neither is the natural situation, they are currently utilized to establish mouse infection models. Here we report a direct contact transmission of SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.351 in wild-type mice. The SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) replicated efficiently and induced significant pathological changes in lungs and tracheas, accompanied by elevated proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs and sera. Mechanistically, the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) spike protein turned to a high binding affinity to mouse angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (mACE2), allowing the mice highly susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) infection. Our work suggests that SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) expands the host range and therefore increases its transmission route without adapted mutation. As the wild house mice live with human populations quite closely, this possible transmission route could be potentially risky. In addition, because SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) is one of the major epidemic strains and the mACE2 in laboratory-used mice is naturally expressed and regulated, the SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351)/mice could be a much convenient animal model system to study COVID-19 pathogenesis and evaluate antiviral inhibitors and vaccines.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Gene Expression , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Receptors, Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Virus Replication
5.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 146, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582003

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At the end of 2019, the world witnessed the emergence and ravages of a viral infection induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Also known as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it has been identified as a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC) by the World Health Organization (WHO) because of its severity. METHODS: The gene data of 51 samples were extracted from the GSE150316 and GSE147507 data set and then processed by means of the programming language R, through which the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that meet the standards were screened. The Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses were performed on the selected DEGs to understand the functions and approaches of DEGs. The online tool STRING was employed to construct a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs and, in turn, to identify hub genes. RESULTS: A total of 52 intersection genes were obtained through DEG identification. Through the GO analysis, we realized that the biological processes (BPs) that have the deepest impact on the human body after SARS-CoV-2 infection are various immune responses. By using STRING to construct a PPI network, 10 hub genes were identified, including IFIH1, DDX58, ISG15, EGR1, OASL, SAMD9, SAMD9L, XAF1, IFITM1, and TNFSF10. CONCLUSION: The results of this study will hopefully provide guidance for future studies on the pathophysiological mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Lung/pathology , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Ontology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/genetics , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Lung/virology , Neutrophil Activation/genetics , Neutrophil Activation/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome/genetics
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580690

ABSTRACT

Since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, pharmaceutical companies and research groups have focused on the development of vaccines and antiviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2. Here, we apply a drug repurposing strategy to identify drug candidates that are able to block the entrance of the virus into human cells. By combining virtual screening with in vitro pseudovirus assays and antiviral assays in Human Lung Tissue (HLT) cells, we identify entrectinib as a potential antiviral drug.


Subject(s)
Benzamides/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Indazoles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzamides/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Repositioning/methods , Humans , Indazoles/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vero Cells , Virus Attachment/drug effects
7.
Virchows Arch ; 479(1): 97-108, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574264

ABSTRACT

Between April and June 2020, i.e., during the first wave of pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), 55 patients underwent long-term treatment in the intensive care unit at the University Hospital of Regensburg. Most of them were transferred from smaller hospitals, often due to the need for an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system. Autopsy was performed in 8/17 COVID-19-proven patients after long-term treatment (mean: 33.6 days). Autopsy revealed that the typical pathological changes occurring during the early stages of the disease (e.g., thrombosis, endothelitis, capillaritis) are less prevalent at this stage, while severe diffuse alveolar damage and especially coinfection with different fungal species were the most conspicuous finding. In addition, signs of macrophage activation syndrome was detected in 7 of 8 patients. Thus, fungal infections were a leading cause of death in our cohort of severely ill patients and may alter clinical management of patients, particularly in long-term periods of treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection , Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology , Lung/microbiology , Multiple Organ Failure/microbiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cause of Death , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lung Diseases, Fungal/mortality , Lung Diseases, Fungal/pathology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/microbiology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/pathology , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
8.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 423, 2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571913

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Autoptic pulmonary findings have been described in severe COVID-19 patients, but evidence regarding the correlation between clinical picture and lung histopathologic patterns is still weak. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort observational study conducted at the referral center for infectious diseases in northern Italy. Full lung autoptic findings and clinical data of patients who died from COVID-19 were analyzed. Lung histopathologic patterns were scored according to the extent of tissue damage. To consider coexisting histopathologic patterns, hierarchical clustering of histopathologic findings was applied. RESULTS: Whole pulmonary examination was available in 75 out of 92 full autopsies. Forty-eight hospitalized patients (64%), 44 from ICU and four from the medical ward, had complete clinical data. The histopathologic patterns had a time-dependent distribution with considerable overlap among patterns. Duration of positive-pressure ventilation (p < 0.0001), mean positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (p = 0.007), worst serum albumin (p = 0.017), interleukin 6 (p = 0.047), and kidney SOFA (p = 0.001) differed among histopathologic clusters. The amount of PEEP for long-lasting ventilatory treatment was associated with the cluster showing the largest areas of early and late proliferative diffuse alveolar damage. No pharmacologic interventions or comorbidities affected the lung histopathology. CONCLUSIONS: Our study draws a comprehensive link between the clinical and pulmonary histopathologic findings in a large cohort of COVID-19 patients. These results highlight that the positive end-expiratory pressures and the duration of the ventilatory treatment correlate with lung histopathologic patterns, providing new clues to the knowledge of the pathophysiology of severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung , Autopsy , Humans , Lung/pathology , Patient Acuity , Retrospective Studies
9.
Clin Nucl Med ; 47(1): e17-e19, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570159

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: We report 3 patients with COVID-19 findings in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT taken for staging. The first patient, A 64-year-old man with prostate cancer, who had COVID-19 in November 2020 and whose treatment was completed, was observed to continue with COVID-19 findings in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in December 2020 before surgery. Other patients were asymptomatic for the disease. It was determined that a PSMA uptake in the lungs corresponding to the CT findings of COVID-19 had increased in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prostatic Neoplasms , Edetic Acid , Gallium Isotopes , Gallium Radioisotopes , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 169, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566818

ABSTRACT

Twenty months into the COVID-19 pandemic, we are still learning about the various long-term consequences of COVID-19 infection. While many patients do recover with minimal long-term consequences, some patients develop irreversible parenchymal and interstitial lung damage leading to diffuse pulmonary fibrosis. Unfortunately, these are some of the consequences of post-SARS-CoV-2 infection which thousands more people around the world will experience and which will outlast the pandemic for a long time to come. It is now being observed at various leading medical centres around the world that lung transplantation may be the only meaningful treatment available to a select group of patients experiencing serious lung damage and non-resolving COVID-19-associated respiratory failure, resulting from the triad of coronavirus infection, a hyper-inflammatory immune response to it and the inability of the human body to repair that injury.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Transplantation , Pulmonary Fibrosis , Humans , Incidence , Lung/pathology , Pandemics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/epidemiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Cell Rep ; 37(12): 110126, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556413

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have shown that the high mortality caused by viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and influenza virus primarily results from complications of a cytokine storm. Therefore, it is critical to identify the key factors participating in the cytokine storm. Here we demonstrate that interferon-induced protein 35 (IFP35) plays an important role in the cytokine storm induced by SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus infection. We find that the levels of serum IFP35 in individuals with SARS-CoV-2 correlates with severity of the syndrome. Using mouse model and cell assays, we show that IFP35 is released by lung epithelial cells and macrophages after SARS-CoV-2 or influenza virus infection. In addition, we show that administration of neutralizing antibodies against IFP35 considerably reduces lung injury and, thus, the mortality rate of mice exposed to viral infection. Our findings suggest that IFP35 serves as a biomarker and as a therapeutic target in virus-induced syndromes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/blood , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
12.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554851

ABSTRACT

The persistent circulation of SARS-CoV-2 represents an ongoing global threat due to the emergence of new viral variants that can sometimes evade the immune system of previously exposed or vaccinated individuals. We conducted a follow-up study of adult individuals that had received an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, evaluating antibody production and neutralizing activity over a period of 6 months. In addition, we performed mice immunization with inactivated SARS-CoV-2, and evaluated the immune response and pathological outcomes against Gamma and Zeta variant infection. Vaccinated individuals produced high levels of antibodies with robust neutralizing activity, which was significantly reduced against Gamma and Zeta variants. Production of IgG anti-S antibodies and neutralizing activity robustly reduced after 6 months of vaccination. Immunized mice demonstrated cellular response against Gamma and Zeta variants, and after viral infection, reduced viral loads, IL-6 expression, and histopathological outcome in the lungs. TNF levels were unchanged in immunized or not immunized mice after infection with the Gamma variant. Furthermore, serum neutralization activity rapidly increases after infection with the Gamma and Zeta variants. Our data suggest that immunization with inactivated WT SARS-CoV-2 induces a promptly responsive cross-reactive immunity response against the Gamma and Zeta variants, reducing COVID-19 pathological outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross Protection , Cytokines/metabolism , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunization , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Viral Load
13.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 11 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542428

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious lung condition characterized by severe hypoxemia leading to limitations of oxygen needed for lung function. In this study, we investigated the effect of anandamide (AEA), an endogenous cannabinoid, on Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-mediated ARDS in female mice. Single-cell RNA sequencing data showed that the lung epithelial cells from AEA-treated mice showed increased levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and tight junction proteins. MiSeq sequencing data on 16S RNA and LEfSe analysis demonstrated that SEB caused significant alterations in the microbiota, with increases in pathogenic bacteria in both the lungs and the gut, while treatment with AEA reversed this effect and induced beneficial bacteria. AEA treatment suppressed inflammation both in the lungs as well as gut-associated mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). AEA triggered several bacterial species that produced increased levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), including butyrate. Furthermore, administration of butyrate alone could attenuate SEB-mediated ARDS. Taken together, our data indicate that AEA treatment attenuates SEB-mediated ARDS by suppressing inflammation and preventing dysbiosis, both in the lungs and the gut, through the induction of AMPs, tight junction proteins, and SCFAs that stabilize the gut-lung microbial axis driving immune homeostasis.


Subject(s)
Arachidonic Acids/therapeutic use , Endocannabinoids/therapeutic use , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Gastrointestinal Tract/pathology , Lung/pathology , Polyunsaturated Alkamides/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/microbiology , Animals , Arachidonic Acids/pharmacology , Butyrates/metabolism , Cecum/pathology , Cell Separation , Colon/drug effects , Colon/pathology , Discriminant Analysis , Dysbiosis/complications , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Endocannabinoids/pharmacology , Enterotoxins , Female , Gastrointestinal Tract/drug effects , Lymph Nodes/drug effects , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/microbiology , Polyunsaturated Alkamides/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects
14.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(5): 487-497, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537196

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lung transplantation is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease; however, it is infrequently considered for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributable to infectious causes. We aimed to describe the course of disease and early post-transplantation outcomes in critically ill patients with COVID-19 who failed to show lung recovery despite optimal medical management and were deemed to be at imminent risk of dying due to pulmonary complications. METHODS: We established a multi-institutional case series that included the first consecutive transplants for severe COVID-19-associated ARDS known to us in the USA, Italy, Austria, and India. De-identified data from participating centres-including information relating to patient demographics and pre-COVID-19 characteristics, pretransplantation disease course, perioperative challenges, pathology of explanted lungs, and post-transplantation outcomes-were collected by Northwestern University (Chicago, IL, USA) and analysed. FINDINGS: Between May 1 and Sept 30, 2020, 12 patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS underwent bilateral lung transplantation at six high-volume transplant centres in the USA (eight recipients at three centres), Italy (two recipients at one centre), Austria (one recipient), and India (one recipient). The median age of recipients was 48 years (IQR 41-51); three of the 12 patients were female. Chest imaging before transplantation showed severe lung damage that did not improve despite prolonged mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The lung transplant procedure was technically challenging, with severe pleural adhesions, hilar lymphadenopathy, and increased intraoperative transfusion requirements. Pathology of the explanted lungs showed extensive, ongoing acute lung injury with features of lung fibrosis. There was no recurrence of SARS-CoV-2 in the allografts. All patients with COVID-19 could be weaned off extracorporeal support and showed short-term survival similar to that of transplant recipients without COVID-19. INTERPRETATION: The findings from our report show that lung transplantation is the only option for survival in some patients with severe, unresolving COVID-19-associated ARDS, and that the procedure can be done successfully, with good early post-transplantation outcomes, in carefully selected patients. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health. VIDEO ABSTRACT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness/therapy , Lung Transplantation/methods , Lung , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Blood Transfusion/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/surgery , Critical Care/methods , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Female , Humans , Intraoperative Care/methods , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/surgery , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
15.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(10): 1404-1407, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518655

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) affects mainly the lungs causing pneumonia and complications like acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pneumothorax is a rare manifestation of the disease. This report is a description of a series of patients with COVID-19 and spontaneous pneumothorax, some of them with associated pulmonary cysts. METHODOLOGY: Cases were collected retrospectively. We included clinical data from medical records and described radiologic findings. Patients that developed pneumothorax during mechanical ventilation were excluded. RESULTS: Ten cases were included in this report, nine of them were male. The median age of our series was 62 years (IQR = 57-68). The median days since the onset of symptoms until the development of pneumothorax was 27 (IQR = 17-31), most cases developed after the second week of the diagnosis of pneumonia. Two cases required invasive mechanical ventilation, but pneumothorax occurred after ventilator weaning. Three cases showed subpleural pulmonary cysts. CONCLUSIONS: Cysts and pneumothorax are rare manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia with mechanisms not completely understood. This report highlights the role of CT scan in diagnosis of COVID-19 complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cysts/etiology , Lung/pathology , Pneumothorax/etiology , Aged , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colombia/epidemiology , Cysts/diagnostic imaging , Cysts/epidemiology , Cysts/virology , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumothorax/diagnostic imaging , Pneumothorax/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
16.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(10): 1415-1425, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518652

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We aimed to evaluate clinical and laboratory findings of hospitalized asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with COVID-19 and demonstrate that they have different symptoms and/or laboratory results and outcomes than COVID-19 patients with comorbidity (CoV-com) and without comorbidity (CoV-alone). METHODOLOGY: The data of the demographic, clinical, laboratory findings of hospitalized CoV-alone, asthma, COPD patients with COVID-19 (CoV-asthma, CoV-COPD, respectively), and CoV-com were analyzed. RESULTS: Out of 1082 patients hospitalized for COVID-19, 585 (54.1%) had CoV-alone, 40 (3.7%) had CoV-asthma, 46 (4.3%) had CoV-COPD and 411 (38%) had CoV-com. Cough, shortness of breath, fever and weakness were the most common four symptoms seen in all COVID-19 patients. Shortness of breath, myalgia, headache symptoms were more common in CoV-asthma than the other groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.05 respectively). Sputum was more common in CoV-COPD than other groups (p < 0.01). COPD group most frequently had increased values, different from the other groups with CRP>5ng/mL in 91.3%, D-dimer > 0.05mg/dL in 89.1%, troponin > 0.014micg/L in %63.9, INR>1.15 in 52.2%, CK-MB>25U/L in 48.5%, PT>14s in 40.9% of patients (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). NT-ProBNP was found to have the highest AUC value and the best differentiating parameter for CoV-asthma from CoV-alone. Typical CT findings were present in 44.4% of CoV-alone, 57.5% of CoV-asthma, 28.3% of CoV-COPD and 38.9% of CoV-com groups. CoV-COPD and CoV-com patients died more frequently than other groups (17.8%, 18.5%). CONCLUSIONS: CoV-asthma and CoV-COPD patients might have different symptoms and laboratory parameters than other COVID-19 patients which can guide the physicians.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Asthma/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Turkey/epidemiology
17.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(10): 1408-1414, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518651

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In this study, we aimed investigate the relationship of SARS-CoV-2 viral load cycle threshold (Ct) values with pneumonia. METHODOLOGY: A total of 158 patients in whom SARS-CoV-2 was confirmed in upper respiratory tract (URT) samples with molecular method and who had computed tomography (CT) of the chest, between April 2020 and June 2020 were included in this retrospective cross-sectional study. RESULTS: Mean age of 158 PCR positive patients was 45.22 ± 17.89 and 60.8% of them were male. Pneumonia was detected in 40.5% of the patients on their chest CT. A weak but significant correlation was found between SARS-CoV-2 Ct value detected with PCR in analysis of oropharyngeal/ nasopharyngeal (OP/NP) samples and chest CT score (Pearson's r: 0.197, p = 0.01). No correlation was found between the first detected viral load Ct value and age, gender and mortality. There was no significant correlation between chest CT score and mortality. While the areas remaining under ROC curve for Ct value in analysis of OP/NP samples in prediction of chest CT score ≥ 1, ≥ 5 and ≥ 10 were 0.564, 0.640 and 0.703 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We found that the amount of SARS-CoV-2 viral load (inverse relationship with Ct) detected in OP/NP samples of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia did not reflect the increasing severity of pulmonary lesions on chest CT. Although primary target of SARS-CoV-2 is all epithelial cells of the respiratory tract we believe studies comparing viral loads in lower respiratory tract samples are needed to determine the severity of pulmonary disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Load/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Oropharynx/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
18.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256630, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518353

ABSTRACT

Pneumonia is a respiratory infection caused by bacteria or viruses; it affects many individuals, especially in developing and underdeveloped nations, where high levels of pollution, unhygienic living conditions, and overcrowding are relatively common, together with inadequate medical infrastructure. Pneumonia causes pleural effusion, a condition in which fluids fill the lung, causing respiratory difficulty. Early diagnosis of pneumonia is crucial to ensure curative treatment and increase survival rates. Chest X-ray imaging is the most frequently used method for diagnosing pneumonia. However, the examination of chest X-rays is a challenging task and is prone to subjective variability. In this study, we developed a computer-aided diagnosis system for automatic pneumonia detection using chest X-ray images. We employed deep transfer learning to handle the scarcity of available data and designed an ensemble of three convolutional neural network models: GoogLeNet, ResNet-18, and DenseNet-121. A weighted average ensemble technique was adopted, wherein the weights assigned to the base learners were determined using a novel approach. The scores of four standard evaluation metrics, precision, recall, f1-score, and the area under the curve, are fused to form the weight vector, which in studies in the literature was frequently set experimentally, a method that is prone to error. The proposed approach was evaluated on two publicly available pneumonia X-ray datasets, provided by Kermany et al. and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), respectively, using a five-fold cross-validation scheme. The proposed method achieved accuracy rates of 98.81% and 86.85% and sensitivity rates of 98.80% and 87.02% on the Kermany and RSNA datasets, respectively. The results were superior to those of state-of-the-art methods and our method performed better than the widely used ensemble techniques. Statistical analyses on the datasets using McNemar's and ANOVA tests showed the robustness of the approach. The codes for the proposed work are available at https://github.com/Rohit-Kundu/Ensemble-Pneumonia-Detection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Early Diagnosis , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Thorax/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/virology , Deep Learning , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Neural Networks, Computer , North America , Pneumonia/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thorax/pathology , X-Rays
19.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 1896762, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511530

ABSTRACT

The proposed method introduces algorithms for the preprocessing of normal, COVID-19, and pneumonia X-ray lung images which promote the accuracy of classification when compared with raw (unprocessed) X-ray lung images. Preprocessing of an image improves the quality of an image increasing the intersection over union scores in segmentation of lungs from the X-ray images. The authors have implemented an efficient preprocessing and classification technique for respiratory disease detection. In this proposed method, the histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) algorithm, Haar transform (Haar), and local binary pattern (LBP) algorithm were applied on lung X-ray images to extract the best features and segment the left lung and right lung. The segmentation of lungs from the X-ray can improve the accuracy of results in COVID-19 detection algorithms or any machine/deep learning techniques. The segmented lungs are validated over intersection over union scores to compare the algorithms. The preprocessed X-ray image results in better accuracy in classification for all three classes (normal/COVID-19/pneumonia) than unprocessed raw images. VGGNet, AlexNet, Resnet, and the proposed deep neural network were implemented for the classification of respiratory diseases. Among these architectures, the proposed deep neural network outperformed the other models with better classification accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Algorithms , Deep Learning , Expert Systems , Humans , Machine Learning , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , X-Rays
20.
Front Immunol ; 12: 656419, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506563

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) is the global health problem with the second highest number of deaths from a communicable disease after COVID-19. Although TB is curable, poor health infrastructure, long and grueling TB treatments have led to the spread of TB pandemic with alarmingly increasing multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB prevalence. Alternative host modulating therapies can be employed to improve TB drug efficacies or dampen the exaggerated inflammatory responses to improve lung function. Here, we investigated the adjunct therapy of natural immune-modulatory compound berberine in C57BL/6 mouse model of pulmonary TB. Berberine treatment did not affect Mtb growth in axenic cultures; however, it showed increased bacterial killing in primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. Ad libitum berberine administration was beneficial to the host in combination with rifampicin and isoniazid. Berberine adjunctive treatment resulted in decreased lung pathology with no additive or synergistic effects on bacterial burdens in mice. Lung immune cell flow cytometry analysis showed that adjunctive berberine treatment decreased neutrophil, CD11b+ dendritic cell and recruited interstitial macrophage numbers. Late onset of adjunctive berberine treatment resulted in a similar phenotype with consistently reduced numbers of neutrophils both in lungs and the spleen. Together, our results suggest that berberine can be supplemented as an immunomodulatory agent depending on the disease stage and inflammatory status of the host.


Subject(s)
Antitubercular Agents/therapeutic use , Berberine/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Isoniazid/therapeutic use , Rifampin/therapeutic use , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Animals , Antitubercular Agents/pharmacology , Berberine/pharmacology , Cytokines/immunology , Dendritic Cells/drug effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Isoniazid/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Mice, Inbred C3H , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/growth & development , Neutrophils/drug effects , Neutrophils/immunology , Rifampin/pharmacology , Spleen/drug effects , Spleen/immunology , Spleen/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/immunology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/pathology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...