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1.
Curr Med Imaging ; 17(12): 1487-1495, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622466

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influencing factors for chest CT hysteresis and severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: The chest CT data of patients with confirmed COVID-19 in 4 hospitals were retrospectively analyzed. An independent assessment was performed by one clinician using the DEXIN FACT Workstation Analysis System, and the assessment results were reviewed by another clinician. Furthermore, the mean hysteresis time was calculated according to the median time from progression to the most serious situation to improve chest CT in patients after fever relief. The optimal scaling regression analysis was performed by including variables with statistical significance in univariate analysis. In addition, a multivariate regression model was established to investigate the relationship of the percentage of lesion/total lung volume with lymphocyte and other variables. RESULTS: In the included 166 patients with COVID-19, the average value of the most serious percentage of lesion/total lung volume was 6.62, of which 90 patients with fever had an average hysteresis time of 4.5 days after symptom relief, with a similar trend observed in those without fever. Multivariate analysis revealed that lymphocyte count in peripheral blood and transcutaneous oxygen saturation decreased with the increase of the percentage of lesion/total lung volume. CONCLUSION: There is a hysteresis effect in the improvement of chest CT image relative to fever relief in patients with COVID-19. The pulmonary lesions may be related to the severity as well as decreased lymphocyte count or percutaneous oxygen saturation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Respir Res ; 23(1): 7, 2022 Jan 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622237

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The comparison of respiratory system compliance (Crs) between COVID and non-COVID ARDS patients has been the object of debate, but few studies have evaluated it when considering applied positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP), which is one of the known determinants of Crs itself. The aim of this study was to compare Crs taking into account the applied PEEP. METHODS: Two cohorts of patients were created: those with COVID-ARDS and those with non-COVID ARDS. In the whole sample the association between Crs and type of ARDS at different PEEP levels was adjusted for anthropometric and clinical variables. As secondary analyses, patients were matched for predicted functional residual capacity and the same association was assessed. Moreover, the association between Crs and type of ARDS was reassessed at predefined PEEP level of 0, 5, 10, and 15 cmH2O with a propensity score-weighted linear model. RESULTS: 367 patients were included in the study, 276 patients with COVID-ARDS and 91 with non-COVID ARDS. The association between Crs and type of ARDS was not significant in both the complete cohorts (p = 0.17) and in the matched cohorts (p = 0.92). This was true also for the propensity score weighted association at PEEP 5, 10 and 15 cmH2O, while it was statistically significant at PEEP 0 (with a median difference of 3 ml/cmH2O, which in our opinion is not clinically significant). CONCLUSIONS: The compliance of the respiratory system is similar between COVID ARDS and non-COVID ARDS when calculated at the same PEEP level and while taking into account patients' anthropometric characteristics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Aged , Anthropometry , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Functional Residual Capacity , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Lung/virology , Lung Compliance , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Treatment Outcome
3.
Bull Exp Biol Med ; 172(3): 364-367, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616180

ABSTRACT

The article presents a theoretical rationale and a clinical case of relief of post-COVID ventilation failure by inhalation of Xe and O2 gas mixture. Pneumonitis of coronavirus etiology transforms saturated phospholipids of surfactant into a solid-ordered phase, which disrupts surface tension, alveolar pneumatization, and alveolar-capillary gas exchange. Using molecular modeling (B3LYP/lanl2dz; GAUSSIAN09), we demonstrated that Xe atom due to the van der Waals dispersion interaction increases the distance between the phospholipid acyl chains providing a phase transition from the solid-ordered to liquid phase and restored the surface-active monolayer surfactant film. A clinical case confirmed that short-term inhalations of the Xe and O2 gas mixture relieved manifestations of ventilation insufficiency and increased SpO2 and pneumatization of the terminal parts of the lungs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Xenon/administration & dosage , Administration, Inhalation , Anesthetics, Inhalation/administration & dosage , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/rehabilitation , COVID-19/therapy , Drug Combinations , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration/drug effects , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Russia , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 12, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608868

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the response to lung recruitment maneuvers (LRMs) varies considerably from one patient to another and so is difficult to predict. The aim of the study was to determine whether or not the recruitment-to-inflation (R/I) ratio could differentiate between patients according to the change in lung mechanics during the LRM. METHODS: We evaluated the changes in gas exchange and respiratory mechanics induced by a stepwise LRM at a constant driving pressure of 15 cmH2O during pressure-controlled ventilation. We assessed lung recruitability by measuring the R/I ratio. Patients were dichotomized with regard to the median R/I ratio. RESULTS: We included 30 patients with moderate-to-severe ARDS and a median [interquartile range] R/I ratio of 0.62 [0.42-0.83]. After the LRM, patients with high recruitability (R/I ratio ≥ 0.62) presented an improvement in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, due to significant increase in respiratory system compliance (33 [27-42] vs. 42 [35-60] mL/cmH2O; p < 0.001). In low recruitability patients (R/I < 0.62), the increase in PaO2/FiO2 ratio was associated with a significant decrease in pulse pressure as a surrogate of cardiac output (70 [55-85] vs. 50 [51-67] mmHg; p = 0.01) but not with a significant change in respiratory system compliance (33 [24-47] vs. 35 [25-47] mL/cmH2O; p = 0.74). CONCLUSION: After the LRM, patients with high recruitability presented a significant increase in respiratory system compliance (indicating a gain in ventilated area), while those with low recruitability presented a decrease in pulse pressure suggesting a drop in cardiac output and therefore in intrapulmonary shunt.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Artif Organs ; 45(12): 1522-1532, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526346

ABSTRACT

Disturbed oxygenation is foremost the leading clinical presentation in COVID-19 patients. However, a small proportion also develop carbon dioxide removal problems. The Advanced Organ Support (ADVOS) therapy (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) uses a less invasive approach by combining extracorporeal CO2 -removal and multiple organ support for the liver and the kidneys in a single hemodialysis device. The aim of our study is to evaluate the ADVOS system as treatment option in-COVID-19 patients with multi-organ failure and carbon dioxide removal problems. COVID-19 patients suffering from severe respiratory insufficiency, receiving at least two treatments with the ADVOS multi system (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany), were eligible for study inclusion. Briefly, these included patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) according to KDIGO guidelines, and moderate or severe ARDS according to the Berlin definition, who were on invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 72 hours. In total, nine COVID-19 patients (137 ADVOS treatment sessions with a median of 10 treatments per patient) with moderate to severe ARDS and carbon dioxide removal problems were analyzed. During the ADVOS treatments, a rapid correction of acid-base balance and a continuous CO2 removal could be observed. We observed a median continuous CO2 removal of 49.2 mL/min (IQR: 26.9-72.3 mL/min) with some treatments achieving up to 160 mL/min. The CO2 removal significantly correlated with blood flow (Pearson 0.421; P < .001), PaCO2 (0.341, P < .001) and HCO 3 - levels (0.568, P < .001) at the start of the treatment. The continuous treatment led to a significant reduction in PaCO2 from baseline to the last ADVOS treatment. In conclusion, it was feasible to remove CO2 using the ADVOS system in our cohort of COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. This efficient removal of CO2 was achieved at blood flows up to 300 mL/min using a conventional hemodialysis catheter and without a membrane lung or a gas phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Extracorporeal Circulation/instrumentation , Lung/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Renal Dialysis/instrumentation , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Circulation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
8.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 136, 2021 Apr 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511742

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: All over the world, SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia is causing a significant short-term morbidity and mortality, but the medium-term impact on lung function and quality of life of affected patients are still unknown. METHODS: In this prospective observational study, 39 patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia were recruited from a single COVID-19 hospital in Southern Switzerland. At three months patients underwent radiological and functional follow-up through CT scan, lung function tests, and 6 min walking test. Furthermore, quality of life was assessed through self-reported questionnaires. RESULTS: Among 39 patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, 32 (82% of all participants) presented abnormalities in CT scan and 25 (64.1%) had lung function tests impairment at three months. Moreover, 31 patients (79.5%) reported a perception of poor health due to respiratory symptoms and all 39 patients showed an overall decreased quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Medium-term follow up at three months of patients diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia shows the persistence of abnormalities in CT scans, a significant functional impairment assessed by lung function tests and a decreased quality of life in affected patients. Further studies evaluating the long-term impact are warranted to guarantee an appropriate follow-up to patients recovering from SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Quality of Life , Aged , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Convalescence , Female , Forced Expiratory Volume , Health Status , Humans , Length of Stay , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity , Recovery of Function , Respiratory Function Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Vital Capacity , Walk Test
10.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(40)2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493346

ABSTRACT

Since the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing evidence suggests that the innate immune responses play an important role in the disease development. A dysregulated inflammatory state has been proposed as a key driver of clinical complications in COVID-19, with a potential detrimental role of granulocytes. However, a comprehensive phenotypic description of circulating granulocytes in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients is lacking. In this study, we used high-dimensional flow cytometry for granulocyte immunophenotyping in peripheral blood collected from COVID-19 patients during acute and convalescent phases. Severe COVID-19 was associated with increased levels of both mature and immature neutrophils, and decreased counts of eosinophils and basophils. Distinct immunotypes were evident in COVID-19 patients, with altered expression of several receptors involved in activation, adhesion, and migration of granulocytes (e.g., CD62L, CD11a/b, CD69, CD63, CXCR4). Paired sampling revealed recovery and phenotypic restoration of the granulocytic signature in the convalescent phase. The identified granulocyte immunotypes correlated with distinct sets of soluble inflammatory markers, supporting pathophysiologic relevance. Furthermore, clinical features, including multiorgan dysfunction and respiratory function, could be predicted using combined laboratory measurements and immunophenotyping. This study provides a comprehensive granulocyte characterization in COVID-19 and reveals specific immunotypes with potential predictive value for key clinical features associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Granulocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Granulocytes/cytology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunophenotyping , Leukocyte Count , Lung/physiopathology , Models, Biological , Organ Dysfunction Scores , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 347-348, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483172

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is still threatening us, our patients, and the global health care system. Since the first outbreak at the end of 2019 in China, it became rapidly clear that a new variant of a SARS virus, SARS-CoV-2, is threatening our human society worldwide. Since then, the scientific community has accumulated an incredibly large amount of knowledge about the pathophysiology of this virus, primarily affecting the respiratory tract and, in severe cases, subsequently resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure due to uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response syndrome.1 2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers/metabolism , Blood Vessels/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Heart/physiopathology , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
12.
Eur Respir Rev ; 30(162)2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477254

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia is an evolving disease. We will focus on the development of its pathophysiologic characteristics over time, and how these time-related changes determine modifications in treatment. In the emergency department: the peculiar characteristic is the coexistence, in a significant fraction of patients, of severe hypoxaemia, near-normal lung computed tomography imaging, lung gas volume and respiratory mechanics. Despite high respiratory drive, dyspnoea and respiratory rate are often normal. The underlying mechanism is primarily altered lung perfusion. The anatomical prerequisites for PEEP (positive end-expiratory pressure) to work (lung oedema, atelectasis, and therefore recruitability) are lacking. In the high-dependency unit: the disease starts to worsen either because of its natural evolution or additional patient self-inflicted lung injury (P-SILI). Oedema and atelectasis may develop, increasing recruitability. Noninvasive supports are indicated if they result in a reversal of hypoxaemia and a decreased inspiratory effort. Otherwise, mechanical ventilation should be considered to avert P-SILI. In the intensive care unit: the primary characteristic of the advance of unresolved COVID-19 disease is a progressive shift from oedema or atelectasis to less reversible structural lung alterations to lung fibrosis. These later characteristics are associated with notable impairment of respiratory mechanics, increased arterial carbon dioxide tension (P aCO2 ), decreased recruitability and lack of response to PEEP and prone positioning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Lung/physiopathology , Positive-Pressure Respiration/methods , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Humans , Pulmonary Atelectasis/prevention & control , Respiratory Mechanics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(40)2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434221

ABSTRACT

Since the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing evidence suggests that the innate immune responses play an important role in the disease development. A dysregulated inflammatory state has been proposed as a key driver of clinical complications in COVID-19, with a potential detrimental role of granulocytes. However, a comprehensive phenotypic description of circulating granulocytes in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients is lacking. In this study, we used high-dimensional flow cytometry for granulocyte immunophenotyping in peripheral blood collected from COVID-19 patients during acute and convalescent phases. Severe COVID-19 was associated with increased levels of both mature and immature neutrophils, and decreased counts of eosinophils and basophils. Distinct immunotypes were evident in COVID-19 patients, with altered expression of several receptors involved in activation, adhesion, and migration of granulocytes (e.g., CD62L, CD11a/b, CD69, CD63, CXCR4). Paired sampling revealed recovery and phenotypic restoration of the granulocytic signature in the convalescent phase. The identified granulocyte immunotypes correlated with distinct sets of soluble inflammatory markers, supporting pathophysiologic relevance. Furthermore, clinical features, including multiorgan dysfunction and respiratory function, could be predicted using combined laboratory measurements and immunophenotyping. This study provides a comprehensive granulocyte characterization in COVID-19 and reveals specific immunotypes with potential predictive value for key clinical features associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Granulocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Granulocytes/cytology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunophenotyping , Leukocyte Count , Lung/physiopathology , Models, Biological , Organ Dysfunction Scores , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
14.
Radiology ; 301(1): E353-E360, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430241

ABSTRACT

Background SARS-CoV-2 targets angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-expressing cells in the respiratory tract. There are reports of breathlessness in patients many months after infection. Purpose To determine whether hyperpolarized xenon 129 MRI (XeMRI) imaging could be used to identify the possible cause of breathlessness in patients at 3 months after hospital discharge following COVID-19 infection. Materials and Methods This prospective study was undertaken between August and December of 2020, with patients and healthy control volunteers being enrolled. All patients underwent lung function tests; ventilation and dissolved-phase XeMRI, with the mean red blood cell (RBC) to tissue or plasma (TP) ratio being calculated; and a low-dose chest CT, with scans being scored for the degree of abnormalities after COVID-19. Healthy control volunteers underwent XeMRI. The intraclass correlation coefficient was calculated for volunteer and patient scans to assess repeatability. A Wilcoxon rank sum test and Cohen effect size calculation were performed to assess differences in the RBC/TP ratio between patients and control volunteers. Results Nine patients (mean age, 57 years ± 7 [standard deviation]; six male patients) and five volunteers (mean age, 29 years ± 3; five female volunteers) were enrolled. The mean time from hospital discharge for patients was 169 days (range, 116-254 days). There was a difference in the RBC/TP ratio between patients and control volunteers (0.3 ± 0.1 vs 0.5 ± 0.1, respectively; P = .001; effect size, 1.36). There was significant difference between the RBC and gas phase spectral full width at half maximum between volunteers and patients (median ± range, 567 ± 1 vs 507 ± 81 [P = .002] and 104 ± 2 vs 122 ± 17 [P = .004], respectively). Results were reproducible, with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.82 and 0.88 being demonstrated for patients and volunteers, respectively. Participants had normal or nearly normal CT scans (mean, seven of 25; range, zero of 25 to 10 of 25). Conclusion Hyperpolarized xenon 129 MRI results showed alveolar capillary diffusion limitation in all nine patients after COVID-19 pneumonia, despite normal or nearly normal results at CT. © RSNA, 2021 See also the editorial by Dietrich in this issue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/physiopathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Xenon Isotopes , Adult , Aged , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Artif Organs ; 45(12): 1522-1532, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429491

ABSTRACT

Disturbed oxygenation is foremost the leading clinical presentation in COVID-19 patients. However, a small proportion also develop carbon dioxide removal problems. The Advanced Organ Support (ADVOS) therapy (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) uses a less invasive approach by combining extracorporeal CO2 -removal and multiple organ support for the liver and the kidneys in a single hemodialysis device. The aim of our study is to evaluate the ADVOS system as treatment option in-COVID-19 patients with multi-organ failure and carbon dioxide removal problems. COVID-19 patients suffering from severe respiratory insufficiency, receiving at least two treatments with the ADVOS multi system (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany), were eligible for study inclusion. Briefly, these included patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) according to KDIGO guidelines, and moderate or severe ARDS according to the Berlin definition, who were on invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 72 hours. In total, nine COVID-19 patients (137 ADVOS treatment sessions with a median of 10 treatments per patient) with moderate to severe ARDS and carbon dioxide removal problems were analyzed. During the ADVOS treatments, a rapid correction of acid-base balance and a continuous CO2 removal could be observed. We observed a median continuous CO2 removal of 49.2 mL/min (IQR: 26.9-72.3 mL/min) with some treatments achieving up to 160 mL/min. The CO2 removal significantly correlated with blood flow (Pearson 0.421; P < .001), PaCO2 (0.341, P < .001) and HCO 3 - levels (0.568, P < .001) at the start of the treatment. The continuous treatment led to a significant reduction in PaCO2 from baseline to the last ADVOS treatment. In conclusion, it was feasible to remove CO2 using the ADVOS system in our cohort of COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. This efficient removal of CO2 was achieved at blood flows up to 300 mL/min using a conventional hemodialysis catheter and without a membrane lung or a gas phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Extracorporeal Circulation/instrumentation , Lung/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Renal Dialysis/instrumentation , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Circulation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
16.
Eur Respir Rev ; 30(161)2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412449

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious complication of severe systemic or local pulmonary inflammation, such as caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. ARDS is characterised by diffuse alveolar damage that leads to protein-rich pulmonary oedema, local alveolar hypoventilation and atelectasis. Inadequate perfusion of these areas is the main cause of hypoxaemia in ARDS. High perfusion in relation to ventilation (V/Q<1) and shunting (V/Q=0) is not only caused by impaired hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction but also redistribution of perfusion from obstructed lung vessels. Rebalancing the pulmonary vascular tone is a therapeutic challenge. Previous clinical trials on inhaled vasodilators (nitric oxide and prostacyclin) to enhance perfusion to high V/Q areas showed beneficial effects on hypoxaemia but not on mortality. However, specific patient populations with pulmonary hypertension may profit from treatment with inhaled vasodilators. Novel treatment targets to decrease perfusion in low V/Q areas include epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and specific leukotriene receptors. Still, lung protective ventilation and prone positioning are the best available standard of care. This review focuses on disturbed perfusion in ARDS and aims to provide basic scientists and clinicians with an overview of the vascular alterations and mechanisms of V/Q mismatch, current therapeutic strategies, and experimental approaches.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Hypoxia , Lung/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Vasoconstriction
17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(31): e26866, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410308

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak began in late 2019 and spread rapidly throughout China and then the rest of the world. COVID-19 is a serious respiratory disease and many patients' exhibit varying levels of persistent parenchymal lung damage. However, there is currently a lack of effective rehabilitation treatments for COVID-19 patients with lung damage. Several clinical trials have shown that Liuzijue Qigong (LQG) can enhance the strength of respiratory muscles and overall quality of life. In this study, a meta-analysis approach was used to assess the effects of LQG on the lung function of COVID-19 patients during disease recovery. METHODS: Eight databases will be explored for relevant investigations including China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, VIP, China Biology Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. All databases will be explored for articles published from inception through July 2021. Data will be extracted independently by 2 researchers according to the eligibility criteria. Finally, RevMan 5.3.0 will be implemented for statistical analyses. RESULTS: The results of this study will show the effects of LQG on the lung function of COVID-19 patients during disease recovery and will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. CONCLUSIONS: This study will provide reliable evidence based on the effects of LQG on the lung function of COVID-19 patients during disease recovery. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021268102.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Protocols , Lung/abnormalities , Qigong/standards , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Qigong/methods , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
19.
Respir Med ; 188: 106602, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401830

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Survivors of COVID-19 infection may develop post-covid pulmonary fibrosis (PCF) and suffer from long term multi-system complications. The magnitude and risk factors associated with these are unknown. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the prevalence and risk factors associated with PCF and other complications in patients discharged after COVID-19 infection. METHODS: Patients had phone assessment 6 weeks post hospital discharge after COVID-19 infection using a set protocol. Those with significant respiratory symptoms were investigated with a CTPA, Pulmonary Function Tests and echocardiogram. Prevalence of myalgia, fatigue, psychological symptoms and PCF was obtained. Risk factors associated with these were investigated. RESULTS: A large number of patients had persistent fatigue (45.1%), breathlessness (36.5%), myalgia (20.5%) and psychological symptoms (19.5%). PCF was seen in 9.5% of the patients and was associated with persistent breathlessness at 6 weeks and inpatient ventilation [adjusted OR 5.02(1.76-14.27) and 4.45(1.27-15.58)] respectively. It was more common in men and in patients with peak CRP >171.5 mg/L, peak WBC count ≥12 × 10 9/L, severe inpatient COVID-19 CXR changes and CT changes. Ventilation was also a risk factor for persisting fatigue and myalgia, the latter was also more common in those with severe cytokine storm and severe COVID-19 inpatient CXR changes. CONCLUSIONS: All the patients discharged after COVID-19 should be assessed using a set protocol by a multidisciplinary team. Patients who had severe COVID-19 infection particularly those who were intubated and who have persistent breathlessness are at risk of developing PCF. They should have a CT Chest and have respiratory follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lung/physiopathology , Pandemics , Patient Discharge/trends , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnosis , Pulmonary Fibrosis/physiopathology , Respiratory Function Tests , Risk Factors , United Kingdom/epidemiology
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17798, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397898

ABSTRACT

There is increasing evidence of cardiac involvement post-SARS-CoV-2 infections in symptomatic as well as in oligo- and asymptomatic athletes. This study aimed to characterize the possible early effects of SARS-CoV-2 infections on myocardial morphology and cardiopulmonary function in athletes. Eight male elite handball players (27 ± 3.5 y) with past SARS-CoV-2 infection were compared with four uninfected teammates (22 ± 2.6 y). Infected athletes were examined 19 ± 7 days after the first positive PCR test. Echocardiographic assessment of the global longitudinal strain under resting conditions was not significantly changed (- 17.7% vs. - 18.1%). However, magnetic resonance imaging showed minor signs of acute inflammation/oedema in all infected athletes (T2-mapping: + 4.1 ms, p = 0.034) without reaching the Lake-Louis criteria. Spiroergometric analysis showed a significant reduction in VO2max (- 292 ml/min, - 7.0%), oxygen pulse (- 2.4 ml/beat, - 10.4%), and respiratory minute volume (VE) (- 18.9 l/min, - 13.8%) in athletes with a history of SARS-CoV2 infection (p < 0.05, respectively). The parameters were unchanged in the uninfected teammates. SARS-CoV2 infection caused impairment of cardiopulmonary performance during physical effort in elite athletes. It seems reasonable to screen athletes after SARS-CoV2 infection with spiroergometry to identify performance limitations and to guide the return to competition.


Subject(s)
Athletes/statistics & numerical data , Athletic Performance/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/physiopathology , Heart/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Adult , Asymptomatic Infections , Athletic Performance/physiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , Echocardiography/statistics & numerical data , Exercise Test/statistics & numerical data , Germany , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spirometry/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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