Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 720
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
J Tradit Chin Med ; 41(6): 982-984, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614424

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study the possible role of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) of Huangqi (Radix Astragali Mongolici), Gancao (Radix Glycyrrhizae), Jinyinhua (Flos Lonicerae), and Lianqiao (Fructus Forsythiae Suspensae) in absorption of lung lesions in Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. METHODS: A cohort of COVID-19 cases was recruited. During hospitalization, chest computed tomographic (CT) scan and real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test were performed every three days. Comparison was held (Western Medicine, WM vs WM plus TCM) on absorption of lung lesions, time interval from admission to negative test result of RT-PCR (ATN), and medical expense. Multivariate cox regression models were built to identify the possible prognostic factor of delayed absorption of lung lesion. RESULTS: The medical expenditure (1163 ± 379 vs 1137 ± 498, P = 0.863) and ATN (13 ± 4 vs 10 ± 4, P = 0.055) were comparable between cases treated with WM plus TCM and cases only received WM. Multivariate cox regression model showed that cases receiving extra TCM had lower risk of delayed absorption of lung lesions [Hazard ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence Interval (0.06, 0.96), P = 0.043]. CONCLUSION: Compared to WM, the treatment of WM plus TCM facilitates the recovery of pulmonary infiltration on COVID-19 cases without significantly increasing medical expense.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Lung/pathology , Adult , Astragalus propinquus , Female , Forsythia , Glycyrrhiza , Hospitalization , Humans , Lonicera , Lung/virology , Male , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Middle Aged , Plant Extracts
2.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 420, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585885

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is identified as a zoonotic disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, which also can cross-transmit to many animals but not mice. Genetic modifications of SARS-CoV-2 or mice enable the mice susceptible to viral infection. Although neither is the natural situation, they are currently utilized to establish mouse infection models. Here we report a direct contact transmission of SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.351 in wild-type mice. The SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) replicated efficiently and induced significant pathological changes in lungs and tracheas, accompanied by elevated proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs and sera. Mechanistically, the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) spike protein turned to a high binding affinity to mouse angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (mACE2), allowing the mice highly susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) infection. Our work suggests that SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) expands the host range and therefore increases its transmission route without adapted mutation. As the wild house mice live with human populations quite closely, this possible transmission route could be potentially risky. In addition, because SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351) is one of the major epidemic strains and the mACE2 in laboratory-used mice is naturally expressed and regulated, the SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.351)/mice could be a much convenient animal model system to study COVID-19 pathogenesis and evaluate antiviral inhibitors and vaccines.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Gene Expression , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Receptors, Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Virus Replication
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24336, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585788

ABSTRACT

ACE2 is a membrane protein that regulates the cardiovascular system. Additionally, ACE2 acts as a receptor for host cell infection by human coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2 that emerged as the cause of the on-going COVID-19 pandemic and has brought unprecedented burden to economy and health. ACE2 binds the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 with high affinity and shows little variation in amino acid sequence meaning natural resistance is rare. The discovery of a novel short ACE2 isoform (deltaACE2) provides evidence for inter-individual differences in SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility and severity, and likelihood of developing subsequent 'Long COVID'. Critically, deltaACE2 loses SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binding sites in the extracellular domain, and is predicted to confer reduced susceptibility to viral infection. We aimed to assess the differential expression of full-length ACE2 versus deltaACE2 in a panel of human tissues (kidney, heart, lung, and liver) that are implicated in COVID-19, and confirm ACE2 protein in these tissues. Using dual antibody staining, we show that deltaACE2 localises, and is enriched, in lung airway epithelia and bile duct epithelia in the liver. Finally, we also confirm that a fluorescently tagged SARS-CoV-2 spike protein monomer shows low binding at lung and bile duct epithelia where dACE2 is enriched.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Bile Ducts/metabolism , Bile Ducts/virology , Binding Sites , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton , Protein Binding , Protein Isoforms/chemistry , Protein Isoforms/genetics , Protein Isoforms/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Virus Internalization
4.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 146, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582003

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At the end of 2019, the world witnessed the emergence and ravages of a viral infection induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Also known as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it has been identified as a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC) by the World Health Organization (WHO) because of its severity. METHODS: The gene data of 51 samples were extracted from the GSE150316 and GSE147507 data set and then processed by means of the programming language R, through which the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that meet the standards were screened. The Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses were performed on the selected DEGs to understand the functions and approaches of DEGs. The online tool STRING was employed to construct a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs and, in turn, to identify hub genes. RESULTS: A total of 52 intersection genes were obtained through DEG identification. Through the GO analysis, we realized that the biological processes (BPs) that have the deepest impact on the human body after SARS-CoV-2 infection are various immune responses. By using STRING to construct a PPI network, 10 hub genes were identified, including IFIH1, DDX58, ISG15, EGR1, OASL, SAMD9, SAMD9L, XAF1, IFITM1, and TNFSF10. CONCLUSION: The results of this study will hopefully provide guidance for future studies on the pathophysiological mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Lung/pathology , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Ontology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/genetics , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Lung/virology , Neutrophil Activation/genetics , Neutrophil Activation/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome/genetics
5.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(12): e1009735, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581904

ABSTRACT

A key question in SARS-CoV-2 infection is why viral loads and patient outcomes vary dramatically across individuals. Because spatial-temporal dynamics of viral spread and immune response are challenging to study in vivo, we developed Spatial Immune Model of Coronavirus (SIMCoV), a scalable computational model that simulates hundreds of millions of lung cells, including respiratory epithelial cells and T cells. SIMCoV replicates viral growth dynamics observed in patients and shows how spatially dispersed infections can lead to increased viral loads. The model also shows how the timing and strength of the T cell response can affect viral persistence, oscillations, and control. By incorporating spatial interactions, SIMCoV provides a parsimonious explanation for the dramatically different viral load trajectories among patients by varying only the number of initial sites of infection and the magnitude and timing of the T cell immune response. When the branching airway structure of the lung is explicitly represented, we find that virus spreads faster than in a 2D layer of epithelial cells, but much more slowly than in an undifferentiated 3D grid or in a well-mixed differential equation model. These results illustrate how realistic, spatially explicit computational models can improve understanding of within-host dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Load , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580690

ABSTRACT

Since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, pharmaceutical companies and research groups have focused on the development of vaccines and antiviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2. Here, we apply a drug repurposing strategy to identify drug candidates that are able to block the entrance of the virus into human cells. By combining virtual screening with in vitro pseudovirus assays and antiviral assays in Human Lung Tissue (HLT) cells, we identify entrectinib as a potential antiviral drug.


Subject(s)
Benzamides/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Indazoles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzamides/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Repositioning/methods , Humans , Indazoles/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vero Cells , Virus Attachment/drug effects
8.
Virchows Arch ; 479(1): 97-108, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574264

ABSTRACT

Between April and June 2020, i.e., during the first wave of pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), 55 patients underwent long-term treatment in the intensive care unit at the University Hospital of Regensburg. Most of them were transferred from smaller hospitals, often due to the need for an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system. Autopsy was performed in 8/17 COVID-19-proven patients after long-term treatment (mean: 33.6 days). Autopsy revealed that the typical pathological changes occurring during the early stages of the disease (e.g., thrombosis, endothelitis, capillaritis) are less prevalent at this stage, while severe diffuse alveolar damage and especially coinfection with different fungal species were the most conspicuous finding. In addition, signs of macrophage activation syndrome was detected in 7 of 8 patients. Thus, fungal infections were a leading cause of death in our cohort of severely ill patients and may alter clinical management of patients, particularly in long-term periods of treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection , Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology , Lung/microbiology , Multiple Organ Failure/microbiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cause of Death , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lung Diseases, Fungal/mortality , Lung Diseases, Fungal/pathology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/microbiology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/pathology , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
9.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is an urgent need for new antivirals with powerful therapeutic potential and tolerable side effects. METHODS: Here, we tested the antiviral properties of interferons (IFNs), alone and with other drugs in vitro. RESULTS: While IFNs alone were insufficient to completely abolish replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), IFNα, in combination with remdesivir, EIDD-2801, camostat, cycloheximide, or convalescent serum, proved to be more effective. Transcriptome and metabolomic analyses revealed that the IFNα-remdesivir combination suppressed SARS-CoV-2-mediated changes in Calu-3 cells and lung organoids, although it altered the homeostasis of uninfected cells and organoids. We also demonstrated that IFNα combinations with sofosbuvir, telaprevir, NITD008, ribavirin, pimodivir, or lamivudine were effective against HCV, HEV, FLuAV, or HIV at lower concentrations, compared to monotherapies. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our results indicated that IFNα can be combined with drugs that affect viral RNA transcription, protein synthesis, and processing to make synergistic combinations that can be attractive targets for further pre-clinical and clinical development against emerging and re-emerging viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Cell Line , Drug Synergism , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Metabolome/drug effects , Organoids , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Transcriptome/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Viruses/classification , Viruses/drug effects
11.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 161-172, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544335

ABSTRACT

Detailed information on intrahost viral evolution in SARS-CoV-2 with and without treatment is limited. Sequential viral loads and deep sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 from the upper respiratory tract of nine hospitalized children, three of whom were treated with remdesivir, revealed that remdesivir treatment suppressed viral load in one patient but not in a second infected with an identical strain without any evidence of drug resistance found. Reduced levels of subgenomic RNA during treatment of the second patient, suggest an additional effect of remdesivir on viral replication. Haplotype reconstruction uncovered persistent SARS-CoV-2 variant genotypes in four patients. These likely arose from within-host evolution, although superinfection cannot be excluded in one case. Although our dataset is small, observed sample-to-sample heterogeneity in variant frequencies across four of nine patients suggests the presence of discrete viral populations in the lung with incomplete population sampling in diagnostic swabs. Such compartmentalization could compromise the penetration of remdesivir into the lung, limiting the drugs in vivo efficacy, as has been observed in other lung infections.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Evolution, Molecular , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Alanine/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Drug Resistance, Viral , Female , Haplotypes , Humans , Infant , Lung/virology , Male , Phylogeny , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Load , Virus Replication/drug effects
12.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0257892, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526682

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory viral illness causing pneumonia and systemic disease. Abnormalities in pulmonary function tests (PFT) after COVID-19 infection have been described. The determinants of these abnormalities are unclear. We hypothesized that inflammatory biomarkers and CT scan parameters at the time of infection would be associated with abnormal gas transfer at short term follow-up. METHODS: We retrospectively studied subjects who were hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia and discharged. Serum inflammatory biomarkers, CT scan and clinical characteristics were assessed. CT images were evaluated by Functional Respiratory Imaging with automated tissue segmentation algorithms of the lungs and pulmonary vasculature. Volumes of the pulmonary vessels that were ≤5mm (BV5), 5-10mm (BV5_10), and ≥10mm (BV10) in cross sectional area were analyzed. Also the amount of opacification on CT (ground glass opacities). PFT were performed 2-3 months after discharge. The diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) was obtained. We divided subjects into those with a DLCO <80% predicted (Low DLCO) and those with a DLCO ≥80% predicted (Normal DLCO). RESULTS: 38 subjects were included in our cohort. 31 out of 38 (81.6%) subjects had a DLCO<80% predicted. The groups were similar in terms of demographics, body mass index, comorbidities, and smoking status. Hemoglobin, inflammatory biomarkers, spirometry and lung volumes were similar between groups. CT opacification and BV5 were not different between groups, but both Low and Normal DLCO groups had lower BV5 measures compared to healthy controls. BV5_10 and BV10 measures were higher in the Low DLCO group compared to the normal DLCO group. Both BV5_10 and BV10 in the Low DLCO group were greater compared to healthy controls. BV5_10 was independently associated with DLCO<80% in multivariable logistic regression (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.01, 1.64). BV10 negatively correlated with DLCO% predicted (r = -0.343, p = 0.035). CONCLUSIONS: Abnormalities in pulmonary vascular volumes at the time of hospitalization are independently associated with a low DLCO at follow-up. There was no relationship between inflammatory biomarkers during hospitalization and DLCO. Pulmonary vascular abnormalities during hospitalization for COVID-19 may serve as a biomarker for abnormal gas transfer after COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/blood supply , Lung/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
13.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(10): 1404-1407, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518655

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) affects mainly the lungs causing pneumonia and complications like acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pneumothorax is a rare manifestation of the disease. This report is a description of a series of patients with COVID-19 and spontaneous pneumothorax, some of them with associated pulmonary cysts. METHODOLOGY: Cases were collected retrospectively. We included clinical data from medical records and described radiologic findings. Patients that developed pneumothorax during mechanical ventilation were excluded. RESULTS: Ten cases were included in this report, nine of them were male. The median age of our series was 62 years (IQR = 57-68). The median days since the onset of symptoms until the development of pneumothorax was 27 (IQR = 17-31), most cases developed after the second week of the diagnosis of pneumonia. Two cases required invasive mechanical ventilation, but pneumothorax occurred after ventilator weaning. Three cases showed subpleural pulmonary cysts. CONCLUSIONS: Cysts and pneumothorax are rare manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia with mechanisms not completely understood. This report highlights the role of CT scan in diagnosis of COVID-19 complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cysts/etiology , Lung/pathology , Pneumothorax/etiology , Aged , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colombia/epidemiology , Cysts/diagnostic imaging , Cysts/epidemiology , Cysts/virology , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumothorax/diagnostic imaging , Pneumothorax/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(10): 1408-1414, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518651

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In this study, we aimed investigate the relationship of SARS-CoV-2 viral load cycle threshold (Ct) values with pneumonia. METHODOLOGY: A total of 158 patients in whom SARS-CoV-2 was confirmed in upper respiratory tract (URT) samples with molecular method and who had computed tomography (CT) of the chest, between April 2020 and June 2020 were included in this retrospective cross-sectional study. RESULTS: Mean age of 158 PCR positive patients was 45.22 ± 17.89 and 60.8% of them were male. Pneumonia was detected in 40.5% of the patients on their chest CT. A weak but significant correlation was found between SARS-CoV-2 Ct value detected with PCR in analysis of oropharyngeal/ nasopharyngeal (OP/NP) samples and chest CT score (Pearson's r: 0.197, p = 0.01). No correlation was found between the first detected viral load Ct value and age, gender and mortality. There was no significant correlation between chest CT score and mortality. While the areas remaining under ROC curve for Ct value in analysis of OP/NP samples in prediction of chest CT score ≥ 1, ≥ 5 and ≥ 10 were 0.564, 0.640 and 0.703 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We found that the amount of SARS-CoV-2 viral load (inverse relationship with Ct) detected in OP/NP samples of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia did not reflect the increasing severity of pulmonary lesions on chest CT. Although primary target of SARS-CoV-2 is all epithelial cells of the respiratory tract we believe studies comparing viral loads in lower respiratory tract samples are needed to determine the severity of pulmonary disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Load/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Oropharynx/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
15.
Viruses ; 12(8)2020 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512665

ABSTRACT

Acute viral bronchiolitis causes significant mortality in the developing world, is the number one cause of infant hospitalisation in the developed world, and is associated with the later development of chronic lung diseases such as asthma. A vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the leading cause of viral bronchiolitis in infancy, remains elusive, and hence new therapeutic modalities are needed to limit disease severity. However, much remains unknown about the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Neutrophilic inflammation is the predominant phenotype observed in infants with both mild and severe disease, however, a clear understanding of the beneficial and deleterious effects of neutrophils is lacking. In this review, we describe the multifaceted roles of neutrophils in host defence and antiviral immunity, consider their contribution to bronchiolitis pathogenesis, and discuss whether new approaches that target neutrophil effector functions will be suitable for treating severe RSV bronchiolitis.


Subject(s)
Bronchiolitis, Viral/immunology , Bronchiolitis, Viral/pathology , Immunity, Innate , Neutrophils/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/pathology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Acute Disease , Animals , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Lung/virology , Mice , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/pathogenicity
16.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 1896762, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511530

ABSTRACT

The proposed method introduces algorithms for the preprocessing of normal, COVID-19, and pneumonia X-ray lung images which promote the accuracy of classification when compared with raw (unprocessed) X-ray lung images. Preprocessing of an image improves the quality of an image increasing the intersection over union scores in segmentation of lungs from the X-ray images. The authors have implemented an efficient preprocessing and classification technique for respiratory disease detection. In this proposed method, the histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) algorithm, Haar transform (Haar), and local binary pattern (LBP) algorithm were applied on lung X-ray images to extract the best features and segment the left lung and right lung. The segmentation of lungs from the X-ray can improve the accuracy of results in COVID-19 detection algorithms or any machine/deep learning techniques. The segmented lungs are validated over intersection over union scores to compare the algorithms. The preprocessed X-ray image results in better accuracy in classification for all three classes (normal/COVID-19/pneumonia) than unprocessed raw images. VGGNet, AlexNet, Resnet, and the proposed deep neural network were implemented for the classification of respiratory diseases. Among these architectures, the proposed deep neural network outperformed the other models with better classification accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Algorithms , Deep Learning , Expert Systems , Humans , Machine Learning , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , X-Rays
17.
Nat Genet ; 53(11): 1606-1615, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503871

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused millions of deaths worldwide. Genome-wide association studies identified the 3p21.31 region as conferring a twofold increased risk of respiratory failure. Here, using a combined multiomics and machine learning approach, we identify the gain-of-function risk A allele of an SNP, rs17713054G>A, as a probable causative variant. We show with chromosome conformation capture and gene-expression analysis that the rs17713054-affected enhancer upregulates the interacting gene, leucine zipper transcription factor like 1 (LZTFL1). Selective spatial transcriptomic analysis of lung biopsies from patients with COVID-19 shows the presence of signals associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a viral response pathway that is regulated by LZTFL1. We conclude that pulmonary epithelial cells undergoing EMT, rather than immune cells, are likely responsible for the 3p21.31-associated risk. Since the 3p21.31 effect is conferred by a gain-of-function, LZTFL1 may represent a therapeutic target.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition , Lung/virology , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transcription Factors/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Transcription Factors/metabolism
18.
J Clin Invest ; 131(20)2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501861

ABSTRACT

The mRNA-1273 vaccine is effective against SARS-CoV-2 and was granted emergency use authorization by the FDA. Clinical studies, however, cannot provide the controlled response to infection and complex immunological insight that are only possible with preclinical studies. Hamsters are the only model that reliably exhibits severe SARS-CoV-2 disease similar to that in hospitalized patients, making them pertinent for vaccine evaluation. We demonstrate that prime or prime-boost administration of mRNA-1273 in hamsters elicited robust neutralizing antibodies, ameliorated weight loss, suppressed SARS-CoV-2 replication in the airways, and better protected against disease at the highest prime-boost dose. Unlike in mice and nonhuman primates, low-level virus replication in mRNA-1273-vaccinated hamsters coincided with an anamnestic response. Single-cell RNA sequencing of lung tissue permitted high-resolution analysis that is not possible in vaccinated humans. mRNA-1273 prevented inflammatory cell infiltration and the reduction of lymphocyte proportions, but enabled antiviral responses conducive to lung homeostasis. Surprisingly, infection triggered transcriptome programs in some types of immune cells from vaccinated hamsters that were shared, albeit attenuated, with mock-vaccinated hamsters. Our results support the use of mRNA-1273 in a 2-dose schedule and provide insight into the potential responses within the lungs of vaccinated humans who are exposed to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Lung/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Immunization, Secondary , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lymphocyte Activation , Mesocricetus , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Single-Cell Analysis , Virus Replication
19.
IEEE Rev Biomed Eng ; 14: 16-29, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501334

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is spreading rapidly around the world, resulting in a massive death toll. Lung infection or pneumonia is the common complication of COVID-19, and imaging techniques, especially computed tomography (CT), have played an important role in diagnosis and treatment assessment of the disease. Herein, we review the imaging characteristics and computing models that have been applied for the management of COVID-19. CT, positron emission tomography - CT (PET/CT), lung ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used for detection, treatment, and follow-up. The quantitative analysis of imaging data using artificial intelligence (AI) is also explored. Our findings indicate that typical imaging characteristics and their changes can play crucial roles in the detection and management of COVID-19. In addition, AI or other quantitative image analysis methods are urgently needed to maximize the value of imaging in the management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/virology , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/methods , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Ultrasonography/methods
20.
J Virol ; 95(22): e0127621, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494956

ABSTRACT

The emergence of life-threatening zoonotic diseases caused by betacoronaviruses, including the ongoing coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, has highlighted the need for developing preclinical models mirroring respiratory and systemic pathophysiological manifestations seen in infected humans. Here, we showed that C57BL/6J wild-type mice intranasally inoculated with the murine betacoronavirus murine hepatitis coronavirus 3 (MHV-3) develop a robust inflammatory response leading to acute lung injuries, including alveolar edema, hemorrhage, and fibrin thrombi. Although such histopathological changes seemed to resolve as the infection advanced, they efficiently impaired respiratory function, as the infected mice displayed restricted lung distention and increased respiratory frequency and ventilation. Following respiratory manifestation, the MHV-3 infection became systemic, and a high virus burden could be detected in multiple organs along with morphological changes. The systemic manifestation of MHV-3 infection was also marked by a sharp drop in the number of circulating platelets and lymphocytes, besides the augmented concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 beta (IL-1ß), IL-6, IL-12, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), thereby mirroring some clinical features observed in moderate and severe cases of COVID-19. Importantly, both respiratory and systemic changes triggered by MHV-3 infection were greatly prevented by blocking TNF signaling, either via genetic or pharmacologic approaches. In line with this, TNF blockage also diminished the infection-mediated release of proinflammatory cytokines and virus replication of human epithelial lung cells infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Collectively, results show that MHV-3 respiratory infection leads to a large range of clinical manifestations in mice and may constitute an attractive, lower-cost, biosafety level 2 (BSL2) in vivo platform for evaluating the respiratory and multiorgan involvement of betacoronavirus infections. IMPORTANCE Mouse models have long been used as valuable in vivo platforms to investigate the pathogenesis of viral infections and effective countermeasures. The natural resistance of mice to the novel betacoronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, has launched a race toward the characterization of SARS-CoV-2 infection in other animals (e.g., hamsters, cats, ferrets, bats, and monkeys), as well as adaptation of the mouse model, by modifying either the host or the virus. In the present study, we utilized a natural pathogen of mice, MHV, as a prototype to model betacoronavirus-induced acute lung injure and multiorgan involvement under biosafety level 2 conditions. We showed that C57BL/6J mice intranasally inoculated with MHV-3 develops severe disease, which includes acute lung damage and respiratory distress that precede systemic inflammation and death. Accordingly, the proposed animal model may provide a useful tool for studies regarding betacoronavirus respiratory infection and related diseases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Lung/pathology , Murine hepatitis virus/pathogenicity , Animals , Cell Line , Containment of Biohazards , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Lung/virology , Mice , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Murine hepatitis virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...