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1.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) ; 31(3): e13567, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731141
2.
Blood Adv ; 6(1): 327-338, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622201

ABSTRACT

Lymphoma represents a heterogeneous hematological malignancy (HM), which is characterized by severe immunosuppression. Patients diagnosed of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during the course of HM have been described to have poor outcome, with only few reports specifically addressing lymphoma patients. Here, we investigated the clinical behavior and clinical parameters of a large multicenter cohort of adult patients with different lymphoma subtypes, with the aim of identifying predictors of death. The study included 856 patients, of whom 619 were enrolled prospectively in a 1-year frame and were followed-up for a median of 66 days (range 1-395). Patients were managed as outpatient (not-admitted cohort, n = 388) or required hospitalization (n = 468), and median age was 63 years (range 19-94). Overall, the 30- and 100-days mortality was 13% (95% confidence interval (CI), 11% to 15%) and 23% (95% CI, 20% to 27%), respectively. Antilymphoma treatment, including anti-CD20 containing regimens, did not impact survival. Patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma had the more favorable survival, but this was partly related to significantly younger age. The time interval between lymphoma diagnosis and COVID-19 was inversely related to mortality. Multivariable analysis recognized 4 easy-to-use factors (age, gender, lymphocyte, and platelet count) that were associated with risk of death, both in the admitted and in the not-admitted cohort (HR 3.79 and 8.85 for the intermediate- and high-risk group, respectively). Overall, our study shows that patients should not be deprived of the best available treatment of their underlying disease and indicates which patients are at higher risk of death. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04352556.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphoma , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Humans , Lymphoma/diagnosis , Lymphoma/therapy , Middle Aged , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
Leuk Lymphoma ; 62(5): 1046-1056, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990327

ABSTRACT

The evolving CoViD-19 pandemic has raised unprecedented challenges for physicians who face significant constraints in medical resources and cancer therapies. The management of patients with lymphoma represents a unique challenge given the heterogeneity of the patient population and treatment goals as well as the myriad choices of therapy available to clinicians. Adaptation in clinical practice with the goal of maintaining appropriate continuity and quality of care while mitigating exposure risk has forced clinicians around the world to develop new standards of practice and can pose difficult ethical choices in vulnerable patient populations. Based on recommendations formulated by several medical groups and societies, this article provides an overview of the general and specific practical considerations that apply to the care of lymphoma patients during the outbreak. We hope to provide a practical framework to help guide physicians in their therapeutic choices and facilitate the ongoing management of this specific patient population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphoma , Physicians , Humans , Lymphoma/diagnosis , Lymphoma/epidemiology , Lymphoma/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Leuk Lymphoma ; 61(14): 3417-3421, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-759769

ABSTRACT

Infectious disease epidemics may overshadow and exacerbate existing challenges in diagnosing lymphoma. We describe pragmatic strategies we have implemented to overcome diagnostic obstacles caused by the local tuberculosis (TB) and HIV epidemics in South Africa, which may serve as a guide to minimize diagnostic delay during the COVID-19 pandemic. We report on the diagnostic utility of a rapid-access lymph node core-biopsy clinic, where lymph node biopsies are taken from outpatients at their first visit. Analysis of tissue biopsies (n = 110) revealed the three most common conditions diagnosed were TB adenitis (34%), lymphoma (29%), and disseminated malignancy (20%). A first-attempt core-biopsy was able to diagnose lymphoma in 27/32 (84%) of cases. Compared with a historical cohort, the diagnostic interval (time from first health visit to diagnostic biopsy) for patients with lymphoma was significantly shorter, 13.5 vs 48 days (p = 0.002).


Subject(s)
Coinfection , HIV Infections/complications , Lymphoma/complications , Lymphoma/diagnosis , Tuberculosis/complications , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delayed Diagnosis , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Lymphoma/epidemiology , Lymphoma/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Tuberculosis, Lymph Node/pathology
5.
Acta Biomed ; 91(3): ahead of print, 2020 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-761245

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 infection was a possible causal factor in the exhaustion and decrease number of NK clonal cells, resulting in a evident improvement of signs, symptoms and clinical features related to NK lymphoma refractory to previous immuno-chemiotherapy. It has been shown that SARS-CoV2 binds to ACE2. Covid-19 may infect NK cells to suppress their functions, as NK cells express angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). The excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines in Covid-19 infection may have played a crucial role in lymphodepletion. Although not published in Covid-19, other RNA viruses that cause acute pulmonary infections promote NK cell apoptosis. In NK/T-cell lymphoma plasma EBV-DNA is a sensitive surrogate biomarker of lymphoma load. In this case, we also notice a dramatic transient reduction in plasmatic EBV-DNA viral copies during Covid-19 pneumonia other than NK clonal cells reduction, and after the infection resolution we described a lymphoma relapse as well as EBV-DNA increase and the rising in NK clonal cells count. Although the mechanism leading to spontaneous remission remain uncharacterized, we hypothezised that a favorable adaptive immunity against concurrent viral infection could render an enhanced anti-tumor effect. We suppose COVID-19 infection have induced a transient remission in this patient affected with NK neoplasm.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Lymphoma/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Humans , Lymphoma/diagnosis , Lymphoma/therapy , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
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