Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 106
Filter
Add filters

Year range
2.
Acta Biomed ; 91(3): e2020008, 2020 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-761251

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a compelling need to identify clinical and laboratory predictors of unfavorable clinical course and death in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). A trend towards low lymphocyte count and high neutrophil counts in patients with poor outcomes has been reported by earlier studies. We aim to synthesize existing data evaluating the relationship between clinical outcomes and abnormal neutrophil and lymphocyte counts at admission in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: An electronic search was carried out in PubMed, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) to identify eligible studies reporting frequency data on neutrophilia and lymphopenia at admission in hospitalization in COVID-19 patients. Pooled odds ratios of clinical outcomes for each parameter were calculated using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis. RESULTS: A total of 22 studies (4,969 patients) were included in this meta-analysis. Lymphopenia at admission was found to be significantly associated with increased odd of progression to severe disease (odds ratio [OR], 4.20; 95% confidence interval [95CI%], 3.46-5.09) and death (OR, 3.71; 95%CI, 1.63-8.44). Neutrophilia at admission was also found to be significantly associated with increased odd of progression to severe disease (OR, 7.99; 95%CI, 1.77-36.14) and death (OR, 7.87; 95%CI, 1.75-35.35). Subgroup analysis revealed that COVID-19 patients with severe lymphopenia (<0.5 x10×9/L) had 12-fold increased odds of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSION: Admission lymphopenia and neutrophilia are associated with poor outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Regular monitoring and early and even more aggressive intervention shall hence be advisable in patients with low lymphocyte and high neutrophil counts. These variables may be useful in risk stratification models.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Leukocyte Disorders/congenital , Lymphopenia/complications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Disease Progression , Global Health , Humans , Leukocyte Disorders/complications , Leukocyte Disorders/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Risk Factors , Survival Rate/trends
3.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 252(1): 73-84, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750866

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has killed many people worldwide since December 2019, and Iran has been among the most affected countries. In this retrospective study, we aimed to determine the prognostic factors associated with mortality in COVID-19 patients by analyzing 396 survived and 63 non-survived patients in Shahid Modarres Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from January 30th until April 5th, 2020. As the results, the BMI > 35 (p = 0.0003), lung cancer (p = 0.007), chronic kidney disease (p = 0.002), Immunocompromised condition (p = 0.003), and diabetes (p = 0.018) were more frequently observed in the expired group. The history of statins use was more common in the discharged group (p = 0.002), while there was no significant difference in the drug history of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, and/or steroids, and in the past-year influenza vaccination. Multivariable regression demonstrated rising odds of in-hospital death related with age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.055, p = 0.002), levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (OR = 2.915, p < 0.001), creatinine (OR = 1.740, p = 0.023), lymphocyte count (OR = 0.999, p = 0.008), and magnesium level (OR = 0.032, p < 0.001) on admission. In conclusion, the patients with older age and higher BMI with lymphopenia, hypomagnesemia, elevated CRP and/or raised creatinine on admission are at higher risk of mortality due to the COVID-19 infection, which requires the physicians to use timely and strong therapeutic measures for such patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Age Factors , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Inflammation/epidemiology , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Iran/epidemiology , Kidney Diseases/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Odds Ratio , Overweight/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Prognosis , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Symptom Assessment
4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 192, 2020 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-748172

Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Disease Progression , Female , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/blood , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/genetics , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/immunology , Humans , Indoleamine-Pyrrole 2,3,-Dioxygenase/blood , Indoleamine-Pyrrole 2,3,-Dioxygenase/genetics , Indoleamine-Pyrrole 2,3,-Dioxygenase/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/diagnosis , Lymphopenia/genetics , Lymphopenia/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , T-Lymphocytes/virology , Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily, Member 7/blood , Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily, Member 7/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily, Member 7/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily, Member 9/blood , Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily, Member 9/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily, Member 9/immunology
5.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 640, 2020 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736377

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the world deeply, with more than 14,000,000 people infected and nearly 600,000 deaths. This review aimed to summarize the epidemiologic traits, clinical spectrum, CT results and laboratory findings of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We scoped for relevant literatures published during 1st December 2019 to 16th July 2020 based on three databases using English and Chinese languages. We reviewed and analyzed the relevant outcomes. RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic was found to have a higher transmission rate compared to SARS and MERS and involved 4 stages of evolution. The basic reproduction number (R0) is 3.32 (95% CI:3.24-3.39), the incubation period was 5.24 days (95% CI:3.97-6.50, 5 studies) on average, and the average time for symptoms onset varied by countries. Common clinical spectrums identified included fever (38.1-39.0 °C), cough and fatigue, with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) being the most common complication reported. Body temperatures above 39.0 °C, dyspnea, and anorexia were more common symptoms in severe patients. Aged over 65 years old, having co-morbidities, and developing complications were the commonest high-risk factors associated with severe conditions. Leucopenia and lymphopenia were the most common signs of infection while liver and kidney damage were rare but may cause bad outcomes for patients. The bilateral, multifocal Ground-Glass Opacification (GGO) on peripheral, and the consolidative pulmonary opacity were the most frequent CT results and the tendency of mortality rates differed by region. CONCLUSIONS: We provided a bird's-eye view of the COVID-19 during the current pandemic, which will help better understanding the key traits of the disease. The findings could be used for disease's future research, control and prevention.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/epidemiology , Age Factors , Aged , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cough/epidemiology , Demography , Disease Progression , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Laboratories , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
6.
Cell Host Microbe ; 27(6): 992-1000.e3, 2020 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-735030

ABSTRACT

Proper management of COVID-19 mandates better understanding of disease pathogenesis. The sudden clinical deterioration 7-8 days after initial symptom onset suggests that severe respiratory failure (SRF) in COVID-19 is driven by a unique pattern of immune dysfunction. We studied immune responses of 54 COVID-19 patients, 28 of whom had SRF. All patients with SRF displayed either macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) or very low human leukocyte antigen D related (HLA-DR) expression accompanied by profound depletion of CD4 lymphocytes, CD19 lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by circulating monocytes was sustained, a pattern distinct from bacterial sepsis or influenza. SARS-CoV-2 patient plasma inhibited HLA-DR expression, and this was partially restored by the IL-6 blocker Tocilizumab; off-label Tocilizumab treatment of patients was accompanied by increase in circulating lymphocytes. Thus, the unique pattern of immune dysregulation in severe COVID-19 is characterized by IL-6-mediated low HLA-DR expression and lymphopenia, associated with sustained cytokine production and hyper-inflammation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Female , HLA-DR Antigens/immunology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Macrophage Activation , Male , Monocytes/pathology , Pandemics
7.
JCI Insight ; 5(13)2020 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDFatal cases of COVID-19 are increasing globally. We retrospectively investigated the potential of immunologic parameters as early predictors of COVID-19.METHODSA total of 1018 patients with confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled in our 2-center retrospective study. Clinical feature, laboratory test, immunological test, radiological findings, and outcomes data were collected. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate factors associated with in-hospital mortality. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and survival curves were plotted to evaluate their clinical utility.RESULTSThe counts of all T lymphocyte subsets were markedly lower in nonsurvivors than in survivors, especially CD8+ T cells. Among all tested cytokines, IL-6 was elevated most significantly, with an upward trend of more than 10-fold. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, IL-6 levels of more than 20 pg/mL and CD8+ T cell counts of less than 165 cells/µL were found to be associated with in-hospital mortality after adjusting for confounding factors. Groups with IL-6 levels of more than 20 pg/mL and CD8+ T cell counts of less than 165 cells/µL had a higher percentage of older and male patients as well as a higher proportion of patients with comorbidities, ventilation, intensive care unit admission, shock, and death. Furthermore, the receiver operating curve of the model combining IL-6 (>20 pg/mL) and CD8+ T cell counts (<165 cells/µL) displayed a more favorable discrimination than that of the CURB-65 score. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test showed a good fit of the model, with no statistical significance.CONCLUSIONIL-6 (>20 pg/mL) and CD8+ T cell counts (<165 cells/µL) are 2 reliable prognostic indicators that accurately stratify patients into risk categories and predict COVID-19 mortality.FundingThis work was supported by funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 81772477 and 81201848).


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Hospital Mortality , Interleukin-6/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Aged , Area Under Curve , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Logistic Models , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Receptors, Interleukin-2/immunology , Retrospective Studies , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
9.
Int J Biol Sci ; 16(14): 2479-2489, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721623

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 virus and its associated disease COVID-19 have triggered significant threats to public health, in addition to political and social changes. An important number of studies have reported the onset of symptoms compatible with pneumonia accompanied by coagulopathy and lymphocytopenia during COVID-19. Increased cytokine levels, the emergence of acute phase reactants, platelet activation and immune checkpoint expression are some of the biomarkers postulated in this context. As previously observed in prolonged sepsis, T-cell exhaustion due to SARS-CoV-2 and even their reduction in numbers due to apoptosis hinder the response to the infection. In this review, we synthesized the immune changes observed during COVID-19, the role of immune molecules as severity markers for patient stratification and their associated therapeutic options.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Sepsis/physiopathology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers , Blood Coagulation Disorders/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immune System , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/metabolism , Lymphopenia/immunology , Pandemics , Phenotype , Platelet Activation
10.
Am J Case Rep ; 21: e925779, 2020 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713485

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection commonly presents as fever, cough, and shortness of breath in adults. Children are thought to have milder respiratory symptoms and to recover more quickly. We describe a new presentation of COVID-19 infection in children consisting of multisystem inflammation with decreased left ventricular function and evidence of lung disease. CASE REPORT Three children presented with fever, conjunctivitis, dry and cracked lips, rash, and/or cervical lymphadenopathy for at least 5 days. Two of these children required mechanical ventilation, and 1 of the 2 needed extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to support cardiorespiratory function. All of these children had moderate to severe hyponatremia and lymphopenia, which is usually seen in COVID-19. They were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and high-dose aspirin. All of the children recovered. CONCLUSIONS Early recognition of children with multisystem inflammation is important because they are at increased risk for deterioration. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin was used because this regimen has been shown to be beneficial in vasculitis of Kawasaki disease. The development of shock due to cardiac involvement may require ECMO.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Antipyretics/therapeutic use , Aspirin/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Conjunctivitis/therapy , Conjunctivitis/virology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Exanthema/therapy , Exanthema/virology , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Fever/therapy , Fever/virology , Heart Failure/therapy , Heart Failure/virology , Humans , Hyponatremia/therapy , Hyponatremia/virology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous , Lymphadenopathy/therapy , Lymphadenopathy/virology , Lymphopenia/therapy , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Vasculitis/therapy , Vasculitis/virology
11.
Epidemiol Infect ; 148: e175, 2020 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-711979

ABSTRACT

Our study aimed to systematically analyse the risk factors of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with severe disease. An electronic search in eight databases to identify studies describing severe or critically ill COVID-19 patients from 1 January 2020 to 3 April 2020. In the end, we meta-analysed 40 studies involving 5872 COVID-19 patients. The average age was higher in severe COVID-19 patients (weighted mean difference; WMD = 10.69, 95%CI 7.83-13.54). Patients with severe disease showed significantly lower platelet count (WMD = -18.63, 95%CI -30.86 to -6.40) and lymphocyte count (WMD = -0.35, 95%CI -0.41 to -0.30) but higher C-reactive protein (CRP; WMD = 42.7, 95%CI 31.12-54.28), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; WMD = 137.4, 95%CI 105.5-169.3), white blood cell count(WBC), procalcitonin(PCT), D-dimer, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and creatinine(Cr). Similarly, patients who died showed significantly higher WBC, D-dimer, ALT, AST and Cr but similar platelet count and LDH as patients who survived. These results indicate that older age, low platelet count, lymphopenia, elevated levels of LDH, ALT, AST, PCT, Cr and D-dimer are associated with severity of COVID-19 and thus could be used as early identification or even prediction of disease progression.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology , Age Factors , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Creatinine/blood , Critical Illness , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Leukocyte Count , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Pandemics , Platelet Count , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Procalcitonin/blood , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombocytopenia/blood
12.
Appl Microbiol Biotechnol ; 104(18): 7777-7785, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-709732

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel ß-coronavirus, is the main pathogenic agent of the rapidly spreading pneumonia called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). SARS-CoV-2 infects much more people, especially the elder population, around the world than other coronavirus, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, which is challenging current global public health system. Beyond the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2, microbial coinfection plays an important role in the occurrence and development of SARS-CoV-2 infection by raising the difficulties of diagnosis, treatment, prognosis of COVID-19, and even increasing the disease symptom and mortality. We summarize the coinfection of virus, bacteria and fungi with SARS-CoV-2, their effects on COVID-19, the reasons of coinfection, and the diagnosis to emphasize the importance of microbial coinfection in COVID-19. KEY POINTS: • Microbial coinfection is a nonnegligible factor in COVID-19. • Microbial coinfection exacerbates the processes of the occurrence, development and prognosis of COVID-19, and the difficulties of clinical diagnosis and treatment. • Different virus, bacteria, and fungi contributed to the coinfection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Mycoses/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/virology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/microbiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/microbiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Disease Progression , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Lymphocytes/microbiology , Lymphocytes/virology , Lymphopenia/drug therapy , Lymphopenia/microbiology , Lymphopenia/virology , Mycoses/drug therapy , Mycoses/microbiology , Mycoses/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/microbiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/microbiology , Virus Diseases/virology
13.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 10: 404, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705170

ABSTRACT

Background: The ABO blood group system has been associated with multiple infectious diseases, including hepatitis B, dengue haemorrhagic fever and so on. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a new respiratory infectious disease and the relationship between COVID-19 and ABO blood group system needs to be explored urgently. Methods: A hospital-based case-control study was conducted at Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University from 1 January 2020 to 5 March 2020. A total of 105 COVID-19 cases and 103 controls were included. The blood group frequency was tested with the chi-square statistic, and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated between cases and controls. In addition, according to gender, the studied population was divided into two subgroups, and we assessed the association between cases and controls by gender. Finally, considering lymphopenia as a feature of COVID-19, the relationship between the ABO blood group and the lymphocyte count was determined in case samples. Results: The frequencies of blood types A, B, AB, and O were 42.8, 26.7, 8.57, and 21.9%, respectively, in the case group. Association analysis between the ABO blood group and COVID-19 indicated that there was a statistically significant difference for blood type A (P = 0.04, OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02-1.73) but not for blood types B, AB or O (P = 0.48, OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.66-1.23; P = 0.61, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.53-1.46; and P = 0.23, OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.58-1.15, respectively). An analysis stratified by gender revealed that the association was highly significant between blood type A in the female subgroup (P = 0.02, OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.08-2.27) but not in the male subgroup (P = 0.51, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.78-1.67). The average level of lymphocyte count was the lowest with blood type A in patients, however, compared with other blood types, there was still no significant statistical difference. Conclusions: Our findings provide epidemiological evidence that females with blood type A are susceptible to COVID-19. However, these research results need to be validated in future studies.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/blood , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Lymphopenia/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus , Blood Grouping and Crossmatching , Case-Control Studies , Disease Susceptibility/blood , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors
14.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(15): 8210-8218, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696554

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the CT imaging features/signs of patients with different clinical types of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) via the application of artificial intelligence (AI), thus improving the understanding of COVID-19. PANTIENTS AND METHODS: Clinical data and chest CT imaging features of 58 patients confirmed with COVID-19 in the Fifth Medical Center of PLA General Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. According to the Guidelines on Novel Coronavirus-Infected Pneumonia Diagnosis and Treatment (Provisional 6th Edition), COVID-19 patients were divided into mild type (7), common type (34), severe type (7) and critical type (10 patients). The CT imaging features of the patients with different clinical types of COVID-19 types were analyzed, and the volume percentage of pneumonia lesions with respect to the lung lobes (where the lesion was located) and to the whole lung was calculated with the use of AI software. SPSS 21.0 software was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Common clinical manifestations of COVID-19 patients: fever was found in 47 patients (81.0%), cough in 31 (53.4%) and weakness in 10 (17.2%). Laboratory examinations: normal or decreased white blood cell (WBC) counts were observed in 52 patients (89.7%), decreased lymphocyte counts (LCs) in 14 (24.1%) and increased C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in 18 (31.0%). CT imaging features: there were 48 patients (94.1%) with lesions distributed in both lungs and 46 patients (90.2%) had lesions most visible in the lower lungs; the primary manifestations in patients with common type COVID-19 were ground-glass opacities (GGOs) (23/34, 67.6%) or mixed type (17/34, 50.0%), with lesions mainly distributed in the periphery of the lungs (28/34, 82.4%); the primary manifestations of patients with severe/critical type COVID-19 were consolidations (13/17, 76.5%) or mixed type (14/17, 82.4%), with lesions distributed in both the peripheral and central areas of lungs (14/17,82.4%); other common signs, including pleural parallel signs, halo signs, vascular thickening signs, crazy-paving signs and air bronchogram signs, were visible in patients with different clinical types, and pleural effusion was found in 5 patients with severe/critical COVID-19. AI software was used to calculate the volume percentages of pneumonia lesions with respect to the lung lobes (where the lesion was located) and to the whole lung. There were significant differences in the volume percentages of pneumonia lesions for the superior lobe of the left lung, the inferior lobe of the left lung, the superior lobe of the right lung, the inferior lobe of the right lung and the whole lung among patients with different clinical types (p<0.05). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the volume percentage of pneumonia lesions for the whole lung for the diagnosis of severe/critical type COVID-19 was 0.740, with sensitivity and specificity of 91.2% and 58.8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical and CT imaging features of COVID-19 patients were characteristic to a certain degree; thus, the clinical course and severity of COVID-19 could be evaluated with a combination of an analysis of clinical features and CT imaging features and assistant diagnosis by AI software.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Artificial Intelligence , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/classification , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Cough/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Muscle Weakness/physiopathology , Pandemics/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Software , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
15.
Curr Med Sci ; 40(4): 618-624, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695581

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV2 is characterized by a remarkable variation in clinical severity ranging from a mild illness to a fatal multi-organ disease. Understanding the dysregulated human immune responses in the fatal subjects is critical for management of COVID-19 patients and the pandemic. In this study, we examined the immune cell compositions in the lung tissues and hilar lymph nodes using immunohistochemistry on 6 deceased COVID-19 patients and 4 focal organizing pneumonia (FOP) patients who underwent lung surgery and served as controls. We found a dominant presence of macrophages and a general deficiency of T cells and B cells in the lung tissues from deceased COVID-19 patients. In contrast to the FOP patients, Tfh cells and germinal center formation were largely absent in the draining hilar lymph nodes in the deceased COVID-19 patients. This was correlated with reduced IgM and IgG levels compared to convalescent COVID-19 patients. In summary, our data highlight a defect of germinal center structure in deceased COVID-19 patients leading to an impaired humoral immunity. Understanding the mechanisms of this deficiency will be one of the key points for the management of this epidemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Germinal Center/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Fatal Outcome , Female , Germinal Center/pathology , Humans , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/mortality , Lymphopenia/pathology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/pathology
16.
Mult Scler ; 26(10): 1264-1266, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695552

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Most cases of COVID-19 are considered mild, but patients with immunosuppressant treatment might be prone to severe courses of disease. Expert panels advise to delay treatment with cell-depleting MS therapies during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We report a case of a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who developed COVID-19 pneumonia 2 weeks after the first week of cladribine therapy. RESULTS: Despite a severe lymphopenia (absolute lymphocyte count 240/µL), the patient had a moderate course of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Apart from maximal supportive treatment, this could be due to cladribine reducing inflammatory response, which probably contributes considerably to severe courses of COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Cladribine/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Lymphopenia/chemically induced , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Humans , Lymphopenia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/complications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index
18.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 567, 2020 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To assess the dynamic changes in clinical and CT characteristics of COVID-19 patients with different epidemiology histories. METHODS: Fifty-three discharged COVID-19 patients were enrolled at Beijing YouAn Hospital, Capital Medical University, between January 21 and March 10, 2020. Spearman correlation analysis was performed between CT scores and laboratory indicators. Patients were divided into the Wuhan group (lived in or with travel to Wuhan, numbering 30 cases) and non-Wuhan group (close contacts or unknown exposure, totaling 23 cases). The CT and laboratory findings were compared between and within groups during the clinical process. RESULTS: Fever (88.7%), cough (64.2%), fatigue (34%), and abnormal laboratory indicators, including lymphopenia, reduced albumin, albumin/globulin (A/G), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), were mainly observed. Subpleural ground-glass opacities (86.8%) were usually detected at admission. The CT scores were highly correlated with lymphocytes, CRP, albumin, and A/G at initial and follow-ups (all p < 0.05). Four days after admission, most patients (66.7% Wuhan, 47.8% non-Wuhan) showed progression, and the CT scores of Wuhan significantly increased (p = 0.015). Eight days after admission, the vast majority of patients (69.2% Wuhan, 100% non-Wuhan, p = 0.006) presented improvement, and the CT scores of non-Wuhan were significantly lower than Wuhan (p = 0.006). Pneumonia was completely absorbed in most patients 2-4 weeks after discharge. CONCLUSIONS: CT plays a crucial role in the early diagnosis and monitoring of changes in COVID-19. Lymphocytes, CRP, albumin, and A/G are expected to predict disease severity and prognosis. Viral pathogenicity in non-endemic areas may be weaker than core-infected areas. In most patients, lung lesions can disappear around 4 weeks after discharge.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Cough/epidemiology , Fever/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Serum Globulins/analysis , Adult , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cough/virology , Disease Progression , Female , Fever/virology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Travel
19.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 17(9): 1001-1003, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690856
20.
West J Emerg Med ; 21(4): 779-784, 2020 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690365

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the United States, especially in New York City (NYC), led to a tremendous increase in hospitalizations and mortality. There is very limited data available that associates outcomes during hospitalization in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, we reviewed the health records of patients with COVID-19 who were admitted from March 9-April 9, 2020, to a community hospital in NYC. Subjects with confirmed reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of the nasopharyngeal swab for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) were included. We collected data related to demographics, laboratory results, and outcome of hospitalization. Outcome was measured based on whether the patient was discharged home or died during hospitalization. RESULTS: There were 888 consecutive admissions with COVID-19 during the study period, of which 513 were excluded with pending outcome or incomplete information. We included a total of 375 patients in the study, of whom 215 (57%) survived and 160 (43%) died during hospitalization. The majority of patients were male (63%) and of Hispanic origin (66%) followed by Blacks (25%), and others (9%). Hypertension (60%) stands out to be the most common comorbidity followed by diabetes mellitus (47%), cardiovascular disease (17%), chronic kidney disease (17%), and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (9%). On multiple regression analysis, increasing odds of mortality during hospitalization was associated with older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.06 per year increase; p < 0.0001), admission D-dimer more than 1000 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) (OR 3.16; 95% CI, 1.75-5.73; p<0.0001), admission C-reactive protein (CRP) levels of more than 200 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (OR 2.43; 95% CI, 1.36-4.34; p = 0.0028), and admission lymphopenia (OR 2.63; CI, 1.47-4.69; p 0.0010). CONCLUSION: In this retrospective cohort study originating in NYC, older age, admission levels of D-dimer of more than 1000 ng/mL, CRP of more than 200 mg/L and lymphopenia were associated with mortality in individuals hospitalized for COVID-19. We recommend using these risk factors on admission to triage patients to critical care units or surge units to maximize the use of surge capacity beds.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospitalization , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Continental Population Groups/statistics & numerical data , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL