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1.
J Infect Dis ; 224(8): 1333-1344, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lymphopenia is a key feature for adult patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), although it is rarely observed in children. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. METHODS: Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses were used to compare the apoptotic rate of T cells from COVID-19 adults and children and apoptotic responses of adult and child T cells to COVID-19 pooled plasma. Biological properties of caspases and reactive oxygen species were assessed in T cells treated by COVID-19 pooled plasma. RESULTS: Mitochondria apoptosis of peripheral T cells were identified in COVID-19 adult patient samples but not in the children. Furthermore, increased tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in COVID-19 plasma induced mitochondria apoptosis and caused deoxyribonucleic acid damage by elevating reactive oxygen species levels of the adult T cells. However, the child T cells showed tolerance to mitochondrial apoptosis due to mitochondria autophagy. Activation of autophagy could decrease apoptotic sensitivity of the adult T cells to plasma from COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was activated in T cells of COVID-19 adult patients specifically, which may shed light on the pathophysiological difference between adults and children infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lymphopenia/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Apoptosis/immunology , Autophagy , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/immunology , Mitochondria/pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 715023, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477819

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidence has unveiled the secondary infection as one of the mortal causes of post-SARS-CoV-2 infection, but the factors related to secondary bacterial or fungi infection remains largely unexplored. We here systematically investigated the factors that might contribute to secondary infection. By clinical examination index analysis of patients, combined with the integrative analysis with RNA-seq analysis in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell isolated shortly from initial infection, this study showed that the antibiotic catabolic process and myeloid cell homeostasis were activated while the T-cell response were relatively repressed in those with the risk of secondary infection. Further monitoring analysis of immune cell and liver injury analysis showed that the risk of secondary infection was accompanied by severe lymphocytopenia at the intermediate and late stages and liver injury at the early stages of SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, the metagenomics analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the microbial culture analysis, to some extent, showed that the severe pneumonia-related bacteria have already existed in the initial infection.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/mortality , Mycoses/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bacterial Infections/mortality , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/microbiology , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , Female , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Liver/injuries , Liver/virology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
3.
J Immunol Res ; 2021: 9822706, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476890

ABSTRACT

Background: Neutralizing antibody (nAb) response is generated following infection or immunization and plays an important role in the protection against a broad of viral infections. The role of nAb during clinical progression of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains little known. Methods: 123 COVID-19 patients during hospitalization in Tongji Hospital were involved in this retrospective study. The patients were grouped based on the severity and outcome. The nAb responses of 194 serum samples were collected from these patients within an investigation period of 60 days after the onset of symptoms and detected by a pseudotyped virus neutralization assay. The detail data about onset time, disease severity and laboratory biomarkers, treatment, and clinical outcome of these participants were obtained from electronic medical records. The relationship of longitudinal nAb changes with each clinical data was further assessed. Results: The nAb response in COVID-19 patients evidently experienced three consecutive stages, namely, rising, stationary, and declining periods. Patients with different severity and outcome showed differential dynamics of the nAb response over the course of disease. During the stationary phase (from 20 to 40 days after symptoms onset), all patients evolved nAb responses. In particular, high levels of nAb were elicited in severe and critical patients and older patients (≥60 years old). More importantly, critical but deceased COVID-19 patients showed high levels of several proinflammation cytokines, such as IL-2R, IL-8, and IL-6, and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in vivo, which resulted in lymphopenia, multiple organ failure, and the rapidly decreased nAb response. Conclusion: Our results indicate that nAb plays a crucial role in preventing the progression and deterioration of COVID-19, which has important implications for improving clinical management and developing effective interventions.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Female , Humans , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
4.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(9): e1009850, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394562

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the betacoronavirus Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus that can mediate asymptomatic or fatal infections characterized by pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and multi-organ failure. Several studies have highlighted the importance of B and T lymphocytes, given that neutralizing antibodies and T cell responses are required for an effective immunity. In addition, other reports have described myeloid cells such as macrophages and monocytes play a major role in the immunity against SARS-CoV-2 as well as dysregulated pro-inflammatory signature that characterizes severe COVID-19. During COVID-19, neutrophils have been defined as a heterogeneous group of cells, functionally linked to severe inflammation and thrombosis triggered by degranulation and NETosis, but also to suppressive phenotypes. The physiological role of suppressive neutrophils during COVID-19 and their implications in severe disease have been poorly studied and is not well understood. Here, we discuss the current evidence regarding the role of neutrophils with suppressive properties such as granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSCs) and their possible role in suppressing CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes expansion and giving rise to lymphopenia in severe COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lymphopenia/complications , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/immunology , Neutrophils/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
5.
J Infect Dis ; 224(8): 1333-1344, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lymphopenia is a key feature for adult patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), although it is rarely observed in children. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. METHODS: Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses were used to compare the apoptotic rate of T cells from COVID-19 adults and children and apoptotic responses of adult and child T cells to COVID-19 pooled plasma. Biological properties of caspases and reactive oxygen species were assessed in T cells treated by COVID-19 pooled plasma. RESULTS: Mitochondria apoptosis of peripheral T cells were identified in COVID-19 adult patient samples but not in the children. Furthermore, increased tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in COVID-19 plasma induced mitochondria apoptosis and caused deoxyribonucleic acid damage by elevating reactive oxygen species levels of the adult T cells. However, the child T cells showed tolerance to mitochondrial apoptosis due to mitochondria autophagy. Activation of autophagy could decrease apoptotic sensitivity of the adult T cells to plasma from COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was activated in T cells of COVID-19 adult patients specifically, which may shed light on the pathophysiological difference between adults and children infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lymphopenia/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Apoptosis/immunology , Autophagy , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/immunology , Mitochondria/pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
6.
Mol Immunol ; 138: 121-127, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347762

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a novel viral infection threatening worldwide health as currently there exists no effective treatment strategy and vaccination programs are not publicly available yet. T lymphocytes play an important role in antiviral defenses. However, T cell frequency and functionality may be affected during the disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Total blood samples were collected from patients with mild and severe COVID-19, and the total lymphocyte number, as well as CD4+ and CD8 + T cells were assessed using flowcytometry. Besides, the expression of exhausted T cell markers was evaluated. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines were also investigated in the serum of all patients using enzyme-linked immunesorbent assay (ELISA). Finally, the obtained results were analyzed along with laboratory serological reports. RESULTS: COVID-19 patients showed lymphopenia and reduced CD4+ and CD8 + T cells, as well as high percentage of PD-1 expression by T cells, especially in severe cases. Serum secretion of TNF-α, IL-1ß, and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) were remarkably increased in patients with severe symptoms, as compared with healthy controls. Moreover, high levels of triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), were correlated with the severity of the disease. CONCLUSION: Reduced number and function of T cells were observed in COVID-19 patients, especially in severe patients. Meanwhile, the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines was increased as the disease developed. High level of serum IL-2R was also considered as a sign of lymphopenia. Additionally, hypercholesterolemia and hyperlipidemia could be important prognostic factors in determining the severity of the infection.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Lymphopenia/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Triglycerides/blood
7.
mBio ; 12(4): e0150321, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327616

ABSTRACT

Severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been associated with T cell lymphopenia, but no causal effect of T cell deficiency on disease severity has been established. To investigate the specific role of T cells in recovery from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections, we studied rhesus macaques that were depleted of either CD4+, CD8+, or both T cell subsets prior to infection. Peak virus loads were similar in all groups, but the resolution of virus in the T cell-depleted animals was slightly delayed compared to that in controls. The T cell-depleted groups developed virus-neutralizing antibody responses and class switched to IgG. When reinfected 6 weeks later, the T cell-depleted animals showed anamnestic immune responses characterized by rapid induction of high-titer virus-neutralizing antibodies, faster control of virus loads, and reduced clinical signs. These results indicate that while T cells play a role in the recovery of rhesus macaques from acute SARS-CoV-2 infections, their depletion does not induce severe disease, and T cells do not account for the natural resistance of rhesus macaques to severe COVID-19. Neither primed CD4+ nor CD8+ T cells appeared critical for immunoglobulin class switching, the development of immunological memory, or protection from a second infection. IMPORTANCE Patients with severe COVID-19 often have decreased numbers of T cells, a cell type important in fighting most viral infections. However, it is not known whether the loss of T cells contributes to severe COVID-19 or is a consequence of it. We studied rhesus macaques, which develop only mild COVID-19, similar to most humans. Experimental depletion of T cells slightly prolonged their clearance of virus, but there was no increase in disease severity. Furthermore, they were able to develop protection from a second infection and produced antibodies capable of neutralizing the virus. They also developed immunological memory, which allows a much stronger and more rapid response upon a second infection. These results suggest that T cells are not critical for recovery from acute SARS-CoV-2 infections in this model and point toward B cell responses and antibodies as the essential mediators of protection from re-exposure.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Lymphopenia/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Lymphocyte Depletion/methods , Macaca mulatta/immunology , Male
8.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325785

ABSTRACT

Lymphopenia is a frequent hematological manifestation, associated with a severe course of COVID-19, with an insufficiently understood pathogenesis. We present molecular genetic immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic data on SARS-CoV-2 dissemination and viral load (VL) in lungs, mediastinum lymph nodes, and the spleen of 36 patients who died from COVID-19. Lymphopenia <1 × 109/L was observed in 23 of 36 (63.8%) patients. In 12 of 36 cases (33%) SARS-CoV-2 was found in lung tissues only with a median VL of 239 copies (range 18-1952) SARS-CoV-2 cDNA per 100 copies of ABL1. Histomorphological changes corresponding to bronchopneumonia and the proliferative phase of DAD were observed in these cases. SARS-CoV-2 dissemination into the lungs, lymph nodes, and spleen was detected in 23 of 36 patients (58.4%) and was associated with the exudative phase of DAD in most of these cases. The median VL in the lungs was 12,116 copies (range 810-250281), lymph nodes-832 copies (range 96-11586), and spleen-71.5 copies (range 0-2899). SARS-CoV-2 in all cases belonged to the 19A strain. A immunohistochemical study revealed SARS-CoV-2 proteins in pneumocytes, alveolar macrophages, and bronchiolar epithelial cells in lung tissue, sinus histiocytes of lymph nodes, as well as cells of the Billroth pulp cords and spleen capsule. SARS-CoV-2 particles were detected by transmission electron microscopy in the cytoplasm of the endothelial cell, macrophages, and lymphocytes. The infection of lymphocytes with SARS-CoV-2 that we discovered for the first time may indicate a possible link between lymphopenia and SARS-CoV-2-mediated cytotoxic effect.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Lung/virology , Lymph Nodes/virology , Lymphopenia/virology , Mediastinum/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spleen/virology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Lung/pathology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Load
9.
Virulence ; 12(1): 1771-1794, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305404

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly infectious viral disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Laboratory findings from a significant number of patients with COVID-19 indicate the occurrence of leukocytopenia, specifically lymphocytopenia. Moreover, infected patients can experience contrasting outcomes depending on lymphocytopenia status. Patients with resolved lymphocytopenia are more likely to recover, whereas critically ill patients with signs of unresolved lymphocytopenia develop severe complications, sometimes culminating in death. Why immunodepression manifests in patients with COVID-19 remains unclear. Therefore, the evaluation of clinical symptoms and laboratory findings from infected patients is critical for understanding the disease course and its consequences. In this review, we take a logical approach to unravel the reasons for immunodepression in patients with COVID-19. Following the footprints of the virus within host tissues, from entry to exit, we extrapolate the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of immunodepression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immune Tolerance , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Death , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immunity , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication
10.
Pharmacol Res ; 159: 104946, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279674

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has sparked a global pandemic, affecting more than 4 million people worldwide. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can cause acute lung injury (ALI) and even acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); with a fatality of 7.0 %. Accumulating evidence suggested that the progression of COVID-19 is associated with lymphopenia and excessive inflammation, and a subset of severe cases might exhibit cytokine storm triggered by secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (sHLH). Furthermore, secondary bacterial infection may contribute to the exacerbation of COVID-19. We recommend using both IL-10 and IL-6 as the indicators of cytokine storm, and monitoring the elevation of procalcitonin (PCT) as an alert for initiating antibacterial agents. Understanding the dynamic progression of SARS-CoV-2 infection is crucial to determine an effective treatment strategy to reduce the rising mortality of this global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Disease Progression , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Lymphopenia/etiology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Procalcitonin/blood , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Microbiol Immunol Infect ; 54(1): 105-108, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272568

ABSTRACT

Cases of co-infection and secondary infection emerging during the current Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic are a major public health concern. Such cases may result from immunodysregulation induced by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Pandemic preparedness must include identification of disease natural history and common secondary infections to implement clinical solutions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection/immunology , Coinfection/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Humans , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/microbiology , Lymphopenia/virology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Public Health , Superinfection/immunology , Superinfection/microbiology , Superinfection/virology
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 659018, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236672

ABSTRACT

Information on the immunopathobiology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is rapidly increasing; however, there remains a need to identify immune features predictive of fatal outcome. This large-scale study characterized immune responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection using multidimensional flow cytometry, with the aim of identifying high-risk immune biomarkers. Holistic and unbiased analyses of 17 immune cell-types were conducted on 1,075 peripheral blood samples obtained from 868 COVID-19 patients and on samples from 24 patients presenting with non-SARS-CoV-2 infections and 36 healthy donors. Immune profiles of COVID-19 patients were significantly different from those of age-matched healthy donors but generally similar to those of patients with non-SARS-CoV-2 infections. Unsupervised clustering analysis revealed three immunotypes during SARS-CoV-2 infection; immunotype 1 (14% of patients) was characterized by significantly lower percentages of all immune cell-types except neutrophils and circulating plasma cells, and was significantly associated with severe disease. Reduced B-cell percentage was most strongly associated with risk of death. On multivariate analysis incorporating age and comorbidities, B-cell and non-classical monocyte percentages were independent prognostic factors for survival in training (n=513) and validation (n=355) cohorts. Therefore, reduced percentages of B-cells and non-classical monocytes are high-risk immune biomarkers for risk-stratification of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Adaptive Immunity , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/mortality , Lymphopenia/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/immunology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis , Young Adult
13.
Front Immunol ; 12: 661052, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229177

ABSTRACT

While lymphocytopenia is a common characteristic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the mechanisms responsible for this lymphocyte depletion are unclear. Here, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical and immunological data from 18 fatal COVID-19 cases, results showed that these patients had severe lymphocytopenia, together with high serum levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10), and elevation of many other mediators in routine laboratory tests, including C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and natriuretic peptide type B. The spleens and hilar lymph nodes (LNs) from six additional COVID-19 patients with post-mortem examinations were also collected, histopathologic detection showed that both organs manifested severe tissue damage and lymphocyte apoptosis in these six cases. In situ hybridization assays illustrated that SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA accumulates in these tissues, and transmission electronic microscopy confirmed that coronavirus-like particles were visible in the LNs. SARS-CoV-2 Spike and Nucleocapsid protein (NP) accumulated in the spleens and LNs, and the NP antigen restricted in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) positive macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 triggered the transcription of Il6, Il8 and Il1b genes in infected primary macrophages and DCs in vitro, and SARS-CoV-2-NP+ macrophages and DCs also manifested high levels of IL-6 and IL-1ß, which might directly decimate human spleens and LNs and subsequently lead to lymphocytopenia in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 induced lymphocytopenia by promoting systemic inflammation and direct neutralization in human spleen and LNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lymph Nodes/immunology , Lymphopenia/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spleen/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Lymph Nodes/ultrastructure , Lymphopenia/etiology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , RNA, Messenger/immunology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Spleen/ultrastructure
14.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5474-5480, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219314

ABSTRACT

In this study, laboratorial parameters of hospitalized novel coronavirus (COVID-19) patients, who were complicated with severe pneumonia, were compared with the findings of cytokine storm developing in macrophage activation syndrome (MAS)/secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (sHLH). Severe pneumonia occurred as a result of cytokine storm in some patients who needed intensive care unit (ICU), and it is aimed to determine the precursive parameters in this situation. Also in this study, the aim is to identify laboratory criteria that predict worsening disease and ICU intensification, as well as the development of cytokine storm. This article comprises a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to a single institution with COVID-19 pneumonia. This study includes 150 confirmed COVID-19 patients with severe pneumonia. When they were considered as severe pneumonia patients, the clinic and laboratory parameters of this group are compared with H-score criteria. Patients are divided into two subgroups; patients with worsened symptoms who were transferred into tertiary ICU, and patients with stable symptoms followed in the clinic. For the patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection, after they become complicated with severe pneumonia, lymphocytopenia (55.3%), anemia (12.0%), thrombocytopenia (19.3%), hyperferritinemia (72.5%), hyperfibrinogenemia (63.7%) and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (90.8%), aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) (31.3%), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) (20.7%) are detected. There were no significant changes in other parameters. Blood parameters between the pre-ICU period and the ICU period (in which their situation had been worsened and acute respiratory distress syndrome [ARDS] was developed) were also compared. In the latter group lymphocyte levels were found significantly reduced (p = 0.01), and LDH, highly sensitive troponin (hs-troponin), procalcitonin, and triglyceride levels were significantly increased (p < 0.05). In addition, there was no change in hemoglobin, leukocyte, platelet, ferritin, and liver function test levels, including patients who developed ARDS, similar to the cytokine storm developed in MAS/sHLH. COVID-19 pneumonia has similar findings as hyperinflammatory syndromes but does not seem to have typical features as in cytokine storm developed in MAS/sHLH. In the severe patient group who has started to develop ARDS signs, a decrease in lymphocyte level in addition to the elevated LDH, hs-troponin, procalcitonin, and triglyceride levels can be a predictor in progression to ICU admission and could help in the planning of anti-cytokine therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/pathology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aged , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Anemia/blood , Anemia/diagnosis , Anemia/immunology , Anemia/pathology , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Diagnosis, Differential , Disease Progression , Female , Fibrinogen/metabolism , Humans , Hyperferritinemia/blood , Hyperferritinemia/diagnosis , Hyperferritinemia/immunology , Hyperferritinemia/pathology , Intensive Care Units , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/blood , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/immunology , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/diagnosis , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/blood , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/diagnosis , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Procalcitonin/blood , Retrospective Studies , Thrombocytopenia/blood , Thrombocytopenia/diagnosis , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Thrombocytopenia/pathology , Triglycerides/blood , Troponin/blood
15.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 28(3): 264-270, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201297

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The patients with hematological malignancies are a vulnerable group to COVID-19, due to the immunodeficiency resulting from the underlying disease and oncological treatment that significantly impair cellular and humoral immunity. Here we report on a beneficial impact of a passive immunotherapy with convalescent plasma to treat a prolonged, active COVID-19 infection in a patient with a history of nasopharyngeal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with the therapy inducing substantial impairment of particularly humoral arm of immune system. The specific aim was to quantify SARS-CoV2 neutralizing antibodies in a patient plasma during the course of therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Besides the standard of care treatment and monitoring, neutralizing antibody titers in patient's serum samples, calibrated according to the First WHO International Standard for anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin (human), were quantified in a time-dependent manner. During the immunotherapy period peripheral blood flow cytometry immunophenotyping was conducted to characterize lymphocyte subpopulations. RESULTS: The waves of clinical improvements and worsening coincided with transfused neutralizing antibodies rises and drops in the patient's systemic circulation, proving their contribution in controlling the disease progress. Besides the patient's lack of own humoral immune system, immunophenotyping analysis revealed also the reduced level of helper T-lymphocytes and immune exhaustion of monocytes. CONCLUSION: Therapeutic approach based on convalescent plasma transfusion transformed a prolonged, active COVID-19 infection into a manageable chronic disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19/therapy , Immunocompromised Host , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/complications , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Chlorocebus aethiops , Combined Modality Therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunophenotyping , Lymphocyte Subsets/drug effects , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/immunology , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/therapy , Lymphopenia/etiology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/immunology , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/blood , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Rituximab/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vero Cells , Virus Cultivation
16.
Med Princ Pract ; 30(5): 422-429, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197290

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a pandemic infection with profound effects on human society, has challenged our ability to control viral infections. Although at the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, the epidemic seemed controllable in Southern Iran, the disease presented a critical pattern as of May 2020. After a few months of the emergence of COVID-19, its severity and mortality increased dramatically. It has been proposed that antibodies produced during previous exposure to local circulating human coronaviruses or possibly severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 might contribute to the development of more severe and lethal presentations of COVID-19 possibly by triggering antibody-dependent enhancement. The binding of virions complexed with antibodies to Fcγ receptors on the target cells initiates receptor-mediated signaling events, leading to enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and suppression of intracellular antiviral responses at the transcriptome level, followed by endocytosis of the virus and subsequent activation of immune cells. The activated immune cells might accumulate in the lung and promote cytokine storm and lymphopenia. Furthermore, the formation of immune complexes can promote complement activation and subsequent tissue damage. Although there are currently no clinical data to support this hypothesis, a better understanding of these immunopathologic phenomena and their relation to the disease course and severity might give insights into the development of the most efficient prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. This review demonstrates the critical pattern of COVID-19 in Southern Iran and highlights the possible interplay of factors leading to this condition.


Subject(s)
Antibody-Dependent Enhancement/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Humans , Iran , Lymphopenia/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Virion/immunology
17.
J Med Virol ; 93(5): 2867-2874, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196522

ABSTRACT

Increased levels of acute-phase reactants and lymphopenia are predictors of disease severity in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to investigate the role of apoptosis in the etiology of lymphopenia in patients with COVID-19. This multicentered, prospective, and case-control study was conducted with polymerase chain reaction (+) severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) patients, and an age-gender-matched control group. Samples were taken at the time of diagnosis and analyzed via flow cytometry within 24 h. The participants' demographic data and initial laboratory tests were also recorded. In total, 33 patients with COVID-19 (mean age = 45.4 ± 17.2) and 25 controls (mean age = 43.4 ± 17.4) participated in the study. All patients were identified as having mild (16), moderate (5), or severe (12) disease severity. Both early and late apoptotic cells in B and T lymphocytes were increased in all patients with COVID-19 (p < .05). Early apoptotic (EA) B and T lymphocytes were also higher in severe cases compared to mild cases (p = .026). There was no significant difference between lymphopenia and apoptosis in patients with COVID-19. However, patients with lymphopenia (n = 14) and severe COVID-19 (p = .013) had increased EA T lymphocytes. This study's results show that B and T lymphocytes' apoptosis increases in patients with COVID-19. In addition, enhanced T lymphocyte apoptosis is associated with disease severity in lymphopenic patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , COVID-19/immunology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
18.
J Med Virol ; 93(3): 1589-1598, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196482

ABSTRACT

A novel member of human coronavirus, named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has been recently recognized in China and rapidly spread worldwide. Studies showed the decreasing of peripheral blood lymphocytes in a majority of patients. In this study, we have reported the clinical features, laboratory characteristics, the frequency of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations, and their apoptosis pattern in Iranian coronavirus infectious disease (COVID-19) patients. Demographic and clinical data of 61 hospitalized confirmed cases with COVID-19 at Imam Khomeini Hospital were collected and analyzed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from all samples and the apoptosis pattern was evaluated using Annexin V/propidium iodide method. The frequency of lymphocyte subsets, including T-CD4+ , T-CD8+ , NK, B cells, and monocytes, was measured in all patients and 31 controls by flow cytometry. Our findings demonstrated that the percentage of lymphocytes, CD4+ , and CD8+ T cells were decreased in COVID-19 patients compared with the control group. Regarding the clinical severity, the number of lymphocytes, CD4+ , CD8+ T cells, and NK cells were also decreased in severe cases when compared with mild cases. Finally, our data have also indicated the increase in apoptosis of mononuclear cells from COVID-19 patients which was more remarkable in severe clinical cases. The frequency of immune cells is a useful indicator for prediction of severity and prognosis of COVID-19 patients. These results could help to explain the immunopathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 and introducing novel biomarkers, therapeutic strategies, and vaccine candidates.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , Immunophenotyping/methods , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Apoptosis/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Iran , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(8)2021 Apr 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194673

ABSTRACT

Immune homeostasis is a tightly regulated system that is critical for defense against invasion by foreign pathogens and protection from self-reactivity for the survival of an individual. How the defects in this system might result in autoimmunity is discussed in this review. Reduced lymphocyte number, termed lymphopenia, can mediate lymphopenia-induced proliferation (LIP) to maintain peripheral lymphocyte numbers. LIP not only occurs in normal physiological conditions but also correlates with autoimmunity. Of note, lymphopenia is also a typical marker of immune aging, consistent with the fact that not only the autoimmunity increases in the elderly, but also autoimmune diseases (ADs) show characteristics of immune aging. Here, we discuss the types and rates of LIP in normal and autoimmune conditions, as well as the coronavirus disease 2019 in the context of LIP. Importantly, although the causative role of LIP has been demonstrated in the development of type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, a two-hit model has suggested that the factors other than lymphopenia are required to mediate the loss of control over homeostasis to result in ADs. Interestingly, these factors may be, if not totally, related to the function/number of regulatory T cells which are key modulators to protect from self-reactivity. In this review, we summarize the important roles of lymphopenia/LIP and the Treg cells in various autoimmune conditions, thereby highlighting them as key therapeutic targets for autoimmunity treatments.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/etiology , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Autoimmunity/immunology , Lymphopenia/complications , Lymphopenia/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Cell Proliferation/physiology , Homeostasis/immunology , Humans , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology
20.
J Leukoc Biol ; 109(1): 49-53, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188016

ABSTRACT

Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) signaling is involved in innate immune responses and regulates the production of proinflammatory cytokines that can contribute to COVID-19 immunopathology. Clinical trials with BTK inhibitors in COVID-19 treatment have been proposed, and previous studies have attempted to investigate the therapeutic effects of ibrutinib and underlying mechanisms in treating viral pneumonia. These attempts, however, did not consider potential off target effect of BTK inhibitors on T cell differentiation, function, and survival, which may be beneficial in treatment for COVID-19. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of BTK/IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase (ITK) signaling in immunopathology and lymphopenia and discuss the potential of BTK/ITK dual inhibitors such as ibrutinib in modulating immunopathology and lymphopenia, for COVID-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase , COVID-19/drug therapy , Lymphopenia , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/immunology , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/metabolism , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Lymphopenia/drug therapy , Lymphopenia/enzymology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/immunology , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
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