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1.
Immunology ; 164(4): 722-736, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494730

ABSTRACT

Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a TEC kinase with a multifaceted role in B-cell biology and function, highlighted by its position as a critical component of the B-cell receptor signalling pathway. Due to its role as a therapeutic target in several haematological malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, BTK has been gaining tremendous momentum in recent years. Within the immune system, BTK plays a part in numerous pathways and cells beyond B cells (i.e. T cells, macrophages). Not surprisingly, BTK has been elucidated to be a driving factor not only in lymphoproliferative disorders but also in autoimmune diseases and response to infection. To extort this role, BTK inhibitors such as ibrutinib have been developed to target BTK in other diseases. However, due to rising levels of resistance, the urgency to develop new inhibitors with alternative modes of targeting BTK is high. To meet this demand, an expanding list of BTK inhibitors is currently being trialled. In this review, we synopsize recent discoveries regarding BTK and its role within different immune cells and pathways. Additionally, we discuss the broad significance and relevance of BTK for various diseases ranging from haematology and rheumatology to the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, BTK signalling and its targetable nature have emerged as immensely important for a wide range of clinical applications. The development of novel, more specific and less toxic BTK inhibitors could be revolutionary for a significant number of diseases with yet unmet treatment needs.


Subject(s)
Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/enzymology , Immune System/enzymology , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/enzymology , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immune System/drug effects , Immune System/immunology , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/drug therapy , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/enzymology , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/immunology , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/metabolism , Receptors, Chemokine/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism
2.
Br J Haematol ; 196(3): 548-558, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467542

ABSTRACT

Patients affected by lymphoid malignancies (LM) are frequently immune-compromised, suffering increased mortality from COVID-19. This prospective study evaluated serological and T-cell responses after complete mRNA vaccination in 263 patients affected by chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, B- and T-cell lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Results were compared with those of 167 healthy subjects matched for age and sex. Overall, patient seroconversion rate was 64·6%: serological response was lower in those receiving anti-cancer treatments in the 12 months before vaccination: 55% vs 81·9% (P < 0·001). Anti-CD20 antibody plus chemotherapy treatment was associated with the lowest seroconversion rate: 17·6% vs. 71·2% (P < 0·001). In the multivariate analysis conducted in the subgroup of patients on active treatment, independent predictors for seroconversion were: anti-CD20 treatment (P < 0·001), aggressive B-cell lymphoma diagnosis (P = 0·002), and immunoglobulin M levels <40 mg/dl (P = 0·030). The T-cell response was evaluated in 99 patients and detected in 85 of them (86%). Of note, 74% of seronegative patients had a T-cell response, but both cellular and humoral responses were absent in 13·1% of cases. Our findings raise some concerns about the protection that patients with LM, particularly those receiving anti-CD20 antibodies, may gain from vaccination. These patients should strictly maintain all the protective measures.


Subject(s)
/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms , Immunity, Cellular/drug effects , Lymphoproliferative Disorders , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , /immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Hematologic Neoplasms/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/drug therapy , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Seroconversion
3.
Immunology ; 164(4): 722-736, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429802

ABSTRACT

Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a TEC kinase with a multifaceted role in B-cell biology and function, highlighted by its position as a critical component of the B-cell receptor signalling pathway. Due to its role as a therapeutic target in several haematological malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, BTK has been gaining tremendous momentum in recent years. Within the immune system, BTK plays a part in numerous pathways and cells beyond B cells (i.e. T cells, macrophages). Not surprisingly, BTK has been elucidated to be a driving factor not only in lymphoproliferative disorders but also in autoimmune diseases and response to infection. To extort this role, BTK inhibitors such as ibrutinib have been developed to target BTK in other diseases. However, due to rising levels of resistance, the urgency to develop new inhibitors with alternative modes of targeting BTK is high. To meet this demand, an expanding list of BTK inhibitors is currently being trialled. In this review, we synopsize recent discoveries regarding BTK and its role within different immune cells and pathways. Additionally, we discuss the broad significance and relevance of BTK for various diseases ranging from haematology and rheumatology to the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, BTK signalling and its targetable nature have emerged as immensely important for a wide range of clinical applications. The development of novel, more specific and less toxic BTK inhibitors could be revolutionary for a significant number of diseases with yet unmet treatment needs.


Subject(s)
Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/enzymology , Immune System/enzymology , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/enzymology , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immune System/drug effects , Immune System/immunology , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/drug therapy , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/enzymology , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/immunology , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/metabolism , Receptors, Chemokine/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism
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