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1.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(23)2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238060

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic and has claimed over 2 million lives worldwide. Although the genetic sequences of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 have high homology, the clinical and pathological characteristics of COVID-19 differ significantly from those of SARS. How and whether SARS-CoV-2 evades (cellular) immune surveillance requires further elucidation. In this study, we show that SARS-CoV-2 infection leads to major histocompability complex class Ι (MHC-Ι) down-regulation both in vitro and in vivo. The viral protein encoded by open reading frame 8 (ORF8) of SARS-CoV-2, which shares the least homology with SARS-CoV among all viral proteins, directly interacts with MHC-Ι molecules and mediates their down-regulation. In ORF8-expressing cells, MHC-Ι molecules are selectively targeted for lysosomal degradation via autophagy. Thus, SARS-CoV-2-infected cells are much less sensitive to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Because ORF8 protein impairs the antigen presentation system, inhibition of ORF8 could be a strategy to improve immune surveillance.


Subject(s)
Antigen Presentation , COVID-19/immunology , Down-Regulation/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Immune Evasion , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Animals , Autophagy/genetics , Autophagy/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Humans , Lysosomes/genetics , Lysosomes/immunology , Lysosomes/virology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/genetics
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(4)2021 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079663

ABSTRACT

Lysosomotropism is a biological characteristic of small molecules, independently present of their intrinsic pharmacological effects. Lysosomotropic compounds, in general, affect various targets, such as lipid second messengers originating from lysosomal enzymes promoting endothelial stress response in systemic inflammation; inflammatory messengers, such as IL-6; and cathepsin L-dependent viral entry into host cells. This heterogeneous group of drugs and active metabolites comprise various promising candidates with more favorable drug profiles than initially considered (hydroxy) chloroquine in prophylaxis and treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections/Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and cytokine release syndrome (CRS) triggered by bacterial or viral infections. In this hypothesis, we discuss the possible relationships among lysosomotropism, enrichment in lysosomes of pulmonary tissue, SARS-CoV-2 infection, and transition to COVID-19. Moreover, we deduce further suitable approved drugs and active metabolites based with a more favorable drug profile on rational eligibility criteria, including readily available over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. Benefits to patients already receiving lysosomotropic drugs for other pre-existing conditions underline their vital clinical relevance in the current SARS-CoV2/COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , Lysosomes/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Chlorpromazine/pharmacokinetics , Chlorpromazine/pharmacology , Chlorpromazine/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Drug Discovery/methods , Drug Repositioning/methods , Fluvoxamine/pharmacokinetics , Fluvoxamine/pharmacology , Fluvoxamine/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacokinetics , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Interleukin-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-1/immunology , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Lysosomes/immunology , Lysosomes/metabolism , Lysosomes/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacokinetics , Small Molecule Libraries/therapeutic use , Virus Replication/drug effects
3.
Exp Cell Res ; 396(1): 112276, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-752714

ABSTRACT

Autophagy is an evolutionary conserved catabolic process devoted to the removal of unnecessary and harmful cellular components. In its general form, autophagy governs cellular lifecycle through the formation of double membrane vesicles, termed autophagosomes, that enwrap and deliver unwanted intracellular components to lysosomes. In addition to this omniscient role, forms of selective autophagy, relying on specialized receptors for cargo recognition, exert fine-tuned control over cellular homeostasis. In this regard, xenophagy plays a pivotal role in restricting the replication of intracellular pathogens, thus acting as an ancient innate defense system against infections. Recently, selective autophagy of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), more simply ER-phagy, has been uncovered as a critical mechanism governing ER network shape and function. Six ER-resident proteins have been characterized as ER-phagy receptors and their orchestrated function enables ER homeostasis and turnover overtime. Unfortunately, ER is also the preferred site for viral replication and several viruses hijack ER machinery for their needs. Thus, it is not surprising that some ER-phagy receptors can act to counteract viral replication and minimize the spread of infection throughout the organism. On the other hand, evolutionary pressure has armed pathogens with strategies to evade and subvert xenophagy and ER-phagy. Although ER-phagy biology is still in its infancy, the present review aims to summarize recent ER-phagy literature, with a special focus on its role in counteracting viral infections. Moreover, we aim to offer some hints for future targeted approaches to counteract host-pathogen interactions by modulating xenophagy and ER-phagy pathways.


Subject(s)
Autophagosomes/immunology , Bacterial Infections/immunology , Endoplasmic Reticulum/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Macroautophagy/immunology , Virus Diseases/immunology , Autophagosomes/metabolism , Bacteria/immunology , Bacterial Infections/genetics , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Endoplasmic Reticulum/genetics , Endoplasmic Reticulum/microbiology , Endoplasmic Reticulum/virology , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/genetics , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/immunology , Homeostasis/genetics , Homeostasis/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lysosomes/immunology , Lysosomes/metabolism , Macroautophagy/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/immunology
4.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1409, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680017

ABSTRACT

As the world is severely affected by COVID-19 pandemic, the use of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine in prevention or for the treatment of patients is allowed in multiple countries but remained at the center of much controversy in recent days. This review describes the properties of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, and highlights not only their anti-viral effects but also their important immune-modulatory properties and their well-known use in autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus and arthritis. Chloroquine appears to inhibit in vitro SARS virus' replication and to interfere with SARS-CoV2 receptor (ACE2). Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine impede lysosomal activity and autophagy, leading to a decrease of antigen processing and presentation. They are also known to interfere with endosomal Toll-like receptors signaling and cytosolic sensors of nucleic acids, which result in a decreased cellular activation and thereby a lower type I interferons and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Given the antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, there is a rational to use them against SARS-CoV2 infection. However, the anti-interferon properties of these molecules might be detrimental, and impaired host immune responses against the virus. This duality could explain the discrepancy with the recently published studies on CQ/HCQ treatment efficacy in COVID-19 patients. Moreover, although these treatments could be an interesting potential strategy to limit progression toward uncontrolled inflammation, they do not appear per se sufficiently potent to control the whole inflammatory process in COVID-19, and more targeted and/or potent therapies should be required at least in add-on.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Virus Replication/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antigen Presentation , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Humans , Lysosomes/immunology , Lysosomes/virology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology , Virus Replication/immunology
5.
Pathog Dis ; 78(4)2020 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646518

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) around the world has led to a pandemic with high morbidity and mortality. However, there are no effective drugs to prevent and treat the disease. Transcriptome-based drug repositioning, identifying new indications for old drugs, is a powerful tool for drug development. Using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid transcriptome data of COVID-19 patients, we found that the endocytosis and lysosome pathways are highly involved in the disease and that the regulation of genes involved in neutrophil degranulation was disrupted, suggesting an intense battle between SARS-CoV-2 and humans. Furthermore, we implemented a coexpression drug repositioning analysis, cogena, and identified two antiviral drugs (saquinavir and ribavirin) and several other candidate drugs (such as dinoprost, dipivefrine, dexamethasone and (-)-isoprenaline). Notably, the two antiviral drugs have also previously been identified using molecular docking methods, and ribavirin is a recommended drug in the diagnosis and treatment protocol for COVID pneumonia (trial version 5-7) published by the National Health Commission of the P.R. of China. Our study demonstrates the value of the cogena-based drug repositioning method for emerging infectious diseases, improves our understanding of SARS-CoV-2-induced disease, and provides potential drugs for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Ribavirin/pharmacology , Saquinavir/pharmacology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , COVID-19 , Cell Degranulation/immunology , Endocytosis/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Lysosomes/immunology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Neutrophil Activation/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome
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