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1.
Vaccine ; 40(2): 239-246, 2022 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586281

ABSTRACT

Over the last few decades, several emerging or reemerging viral diseases with no readily available vaccines have ravaged the world. A platform to fastly generate vaccines inducing potent and durable neutralizing antibody and T cell responses is sorely needed. Bioinformatically identified epitope-based vaccines can focus on immunodominant T cell epitopes and induce more potent immune responses than a whole antigen vaccine and may be deployed more rapidly and less costly than whole-gene vaccines. Increasing evidence has shown the importance of the CD4+ T cell response in protection against HIV and other viral infections. The previously described DNA vaccine HIVBr18 encodes 18 conserved, promiscuous epitopes binding to multiple HLA-DR-binding HIV epitopes amply recognized by HIV-1-infected patients. HIVBr18 elicited broad, polyfunctional, and durable CD4+and CD8+ T cell responses in BALB/c and mice transgenic to HLA class II alleles, showing cross-species promiscuity. To fully delineate the promiscuity of the HLA class II vaccine epitopes, we assessed their binding to 34 human class II (HLA-DR, DQ, and -DP) molecules, and immunized nonhuman primates. Results ascertained redundant 100% coverage of the human population for multiple peptides. We then immunized Rhesus macaques with HIVBr18 under in vivo electroporation. The immunization induced strong, predominantly polyfunctional CD4+ T cell responses in all animals to 13 out of the 18 epitopes; T cells from each animal recognized 7-11 epitopes. Our results provide a preliminary proof of concept that immunization with a vaccine encoding epitopes with high and redundant coverage of the human population can elicit potent T cell responses to multiple epitopes, across species and MHC barriers. This approach may facilitate the rapid deployment of immunogens eliciting cellular immunity against emerging infectious diseases, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
AIDS Vaccines , COVID-19 , Animals , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Mice , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 428, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585884

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced hyper-inflammation links to the acute lung injury and COVID-19 severity. Identifying the primary mediators that initiate the uncontrolled hypercytokinemia is essential for treatments. Mast cells (MCs) are strategically located at the mucosa and beneficially or detrimentally regulate immune inflammations. In this study, we showed that SARS-CoV-2-triggered MC degranulation initiated alveolar epithelial inflammation and lung injury. SARS-CoV-2 challenge induced MC degranulation in ACE-2 humanized mice and rhesus macaques, and a rapid MC degranulation could be recapitulated with Spike-RBD binding to ACE2 in cells; MC degranulation altered various signaling pathways in alveolar epithelial cells, particularly, the induction of pro-inflammatory factors and consequential disruption of tight junctions. Importantly, the administration of clinical MC stabilizers for blocking degranulation dampened SARS-CoV-2-induced production of pro-inflammatory factors and prevented lung injury. These findings uncover a novel mechanism for SARS-CoV-2 initiating lung inflammation, and suggest an off-label use of MC stabilizer as immunomodulators for COVID-19 treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Degranulation , Lung Injury/metabolism , Mast Cells/metabolism , Pulmonary Alveoli/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Female , Humans , Lung Injury/genetics , Lung Injury/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Transgenic , Pulmonary Alveoli/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
3.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 212-226, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585243

ABSTRACT

The recent emergence of COVID-19 variants has necessitated the development of new vaccines that stimulate the formation of high levels of neutralizing antibodies against S antigen variants. A new strategy involves the intradermal administration of heterologous vaccines composed of one or two doses of inactivated vaccine and a booster dose with the mutated S1 protein (K-S). Such vaccines improve the immune efficacy by increasing the neutralizing antibody titers and promoting specific T cell responses against five variants of the RBD protein. A viral challenge test with the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant confirmed that both administration schedules (i.e. "1 + 1" and "2 + 1") ensured protection against this strain. These results suggest that the aforementioned strategy is effective for protecting against new variants and enhances the anamnestic immune response in the immunized population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CHO Cells , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetulus , Female , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vero Cells
5.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 2194-2198, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504286

ABSTRACT

Inactivated coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 1 (SARS-CoV-1) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), as potential vaccines have been reported to result in enhanced respiratory diseases (ERDs) in murine and nonhuman primate (NHP) pneumonia models after virus challenge, which poses great safety concerns of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) for the rapid wide application of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in humans, especially when the neutralizing antibody levels induced by vaccination or initial infection quickly wane to nonneutralizing or subneutralizing levels over the time. With passive transfer of diluted postvaccination polyclonal antibodies to mimic the waning antibody responses after vaccination, we found that in the absence of cellular immunity, passive infusion of subneutralizing or nonneutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies could still provide some level of protection against infection upon challenge, and no low-level antibody-enhanced infection was observed. The anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG-infused group and control group showed similar, mild to moderate pulmonary immunopathology during the acute phase of virus infection, and no evidence of vaccine-related pulmonary immunopathology enhancement was found. Typical immunopathology included elevated MCP-1, IL-8 and IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; alveolar epithelial hyperplasia; and exfoliated cells and mucus in bronchioles. Our results corresponded with the recent observations that no pulmonary immunology was detected in preclinical studies of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in either murine or NHP pneumonia models or in large clinical trials and further supported the safety of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody-Dependent Enhancement , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/toxicity , Bronchioles/chemistry , Bronchioles/pathology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/analysis , Humans , Hyperplasia , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/toxicity , Lung/pathology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Mice , Mucus , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 754642, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485059

ABSTRACT

Understanding SARS-CoV-2 immune pathology is critical for the development of effective vaccines and treatments. Here, we employed unbiased serial whole-blood transcriptome profiling by weighted gene network correlation analysis (WGCNA) at pre-specified timepoints of infection to understand SARS-CoV-2-related immune alterations in a cohort of rhesus macaques (RMs) and African green monkeys (AGMs) presenting with varying degrees of pulmonary pathology. We found that the bulk of transcriptional changes occurred at day 3 post-infection and normalized to pre-infection levels by 3 weeks. There was evidence of coordination of transcriptional networks in blood (defined by WGCNA) and the nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 burden as well as the absolute monocyte count. Pathway analysis of gene modules revealed prominent regulation of type I and type II interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) in both RMs and AGMs, with the latter species exhibiting a greater breadth of ISG upregulation. Notably, pathways relating to neutrophil degranulation were enriched in blood of SARS-CoV-2 infected AGMs, but not RMs. Our results elude to hallmark similarities as well as differences in the RM and AGM acute response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and may help guide the selection of particular NHP species in modeling aspects of COVID-19 disease outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cell Degranulation , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/blood , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Macaca mulatta , Neutrophils/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Species Specificity
7.
Cell Rep ; 37(5): 109942, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471904

ABSTRACT

Anti-viral monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatments may provide immediate but short-term immunity from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in high-risk populations, such as people with diabetes and the elderly; however, data on their efficacy in these populations are limited. We demonstrate that prophylactic mAb treatment blocks viral replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts in aged, type 2 diabetic rhesus macaques. mAb infusion dramatically curtails severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-mediated stimulation of interferon-induced chemokines and T cell activation, significantly reducing development of interstitial pneumonia. Furthermore, mAb infusion significantly dampens the greater than 3-fold increase in SARS-CoV-2-induced effector CD4 T cell influx into the cerebrospinal fluid. Our data show that neutralizing mAbs administered preventatively to high-risk populations may mitigate the adverse inflammatory consequences of SARS-CoV-2 exposure.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aging/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Diabetes Complications/immunology , Diabetes Complications/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/immunology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation , Macaca mulatta , Male , Neuritis/immunology , Neuritis/prevention & control , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Virus Replication/immunology
8.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5877, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462003

ABSTRACT

Several COVID-19 vaccines have recently gained authorization for emergency use. Limited knowledge on duration of immunity and efficacy of these vaccines is currently available. Data on other coronaviruses after natural infection suggest that immunity to SARS-CoV-2 might be short-lived, and preliminary evidence indicates waning antibody titers following SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this work, we model the relationship between immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a series of Ad26 vectors encoding stabilized variants of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein in rhesus macaques and validate the analyses by challenging macaques 6 months after immunization with the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine candidate that has been selected for clinical development. We show that Ad26.COV2.S confers durable protection against replication of SARS-CoV-2 in the lungs that is predicted by the levels of Spike-binding and neutralizing antibodies, indicating that Ad26.COV2.S could confer durable protection in humans and immunological correlates of protection may enable the prediction of durability of protection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Animals , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Logistic Models , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Nose/immunology , Nose/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/physiology
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 729837, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450810

ABSTRACT

We have developed a dual-antigen COVID-19 vaccine incorporating genes for a modified SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S-Fusion) and the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein with an Enhanced T-cell Stimulation Domain (N-ETSD) to increase the potential for MHC class II responses. The vaccine antigens are delivered by a human adenovirus serotype 5 platform, hAd5 [E1-, E2b-, E3-], previously demonstrated to be effective in the presence of Ad immunity. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with the hAd5 S-Fusion + N-ETSD vaccine by subcutaneous prime injection followed by two oral boosts elicited neutralizing anti-S IgG and T helper cell 1-biased T-cell responses to both S and N that protected the upper and lower respiratory tracts from high titer (1 x 106 TCID50) SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Notably, viral replication was inhibited within 24 hours of challenge in both lung and nasal passages, becoming undetectable within 7 days post-challenge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adenoviruses, Human/genetics , Adenoviruses, Human/immunology , Adenoviruses, Human/metabolism , Administration, Oral , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cytokines/blood , Immunization, Secondary/methods , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Lung/virology , Macaca mulatta , Nose/virology , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Protein Domains/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , Vaccination , Virus Replication/immunology
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19458, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447326

ABSTRACT

Efficacious therapeutics for Ebola virus disease are in great demand. Ebola virus infections mediated by mucosal exposure, and aerosolization in particular, present a novel challenge due to nontypical massive early infection of respiratory lymphoid tissues. We performed a randomized and blinded study to compare outcomes from vehicle-treated and remdesivir-treated rhesus monkeys in a lethal model of infection resulting from aerosolized Ebola virus exposure. Remdesivir treatment initiated 4 days after exposure was associated with a significant survival benefit, significant reduction in serum viral titer, and improvements in clinical pathology biomarker levels and lung histology compared to vehicle treatment. These observations indicate that remdesivir may have value in countering aerosol-induced Ebola virus disease.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Ebolavirus/drug effects , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Administration, Intravenous , Aerosols , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/blood , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Liver/drug effects , Liver/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lymph Nodes/drug effects , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymph Nodes/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Random Allocation , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Viral Load/drug effects , Viremia/drug therapy
11.
Comp Med ; 71(5): 433-441, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444659

ABSTRACT

Animal models are at the forefront of biomedical research for studies of viral transmission, vaccines, and pathogenesis, yet the need for an ideal large animal model for COVID-19 remains. We used a meta-analysis to evaluate published data relevant to this need. Our literature survey contained 22 studies with data relevant to the incidence of common COVID-19 symptoms in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops), and ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Rhesus macaques had leukocytosis on Day 1 after inoculation and pneumonia on Days 7 and 14 after inoculation, in frequencies that were similar enough to humans to reject the null hypothesis of a Fisher exact test. However, the differences in overall presentation of disease were too different from that of humans to successfully identify any of these 4 species as an ideal large animal of COVID-19. The greatest limitation to the current study is a lack of standardization in experimentation and reporting. To expand our understanding of the pathology of COVID-19 and evalu- ate vaccine immunogenicity, we must extend the unprecedented collaboration that has arisen in the study of COVID-19 to include standardization of animal-based research in an effort to find the optimal animal model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ferrets , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Macaca fascicularis , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2
12.
FEBS Lett ; 595(17): 2257-2270, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439663

ABSTRACT

HIV preferentially infects α4 ß7 + CD4 T cells, forming latent reservoirs that contribute to HIV persistence during antiretroviral therapy. However, the properties of α4 ß7 + CD4 T cells in blood and mucosal compartments remain understudied. Employing two distinct models of HIV infection, HIV-infected humans and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected rhesus macaques, we show that α4 ß7 + CD4 T cells in blood are enriched for genes regulating cell cycle progression and cellular metabolism. Unlike their circulating counterparts, rectal α4 ß7 + CD4 T cells exhibited a core tissue-residency gene expression program. These features were conserved across primate species, indicating that the environment influences memory T-cell transcriptional networks. Our findings provide an important molecular foundation for understanding the role of α4 ß7 in HIV infection.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , HIV Infections/blood , Integrins/metabolism , Adult , Animals , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cell Cycle , Cell Proliferation , Gastric Mucosa/cytology , Gastric Mucosa/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunization , Macaca mulatta , Male , Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/blood , Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/virology
13.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(9): e1009701, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435628

ABSTRACT

The speed of development, versatility and efficacy of mRNA-based vaccines have been amply demonstrated in the case of SARS-CoV-2. DNA vaccines represent an important alternative since they induce both humoral and cellular immune responses in animal models and in human trials. We tested the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA-based vaccine regimens expressing different prefusion-stabilized Wuhan-Hu-1 SARS-CoV-2 Spike antigens upon intramuscular injection followed by electroporation in rhesus macaques. Different Spike DNA vaccine regimens induced antibodies that potently neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in vitro and elicited robust T cell responses. The antibodies recognized and potently neutralized a panel of different Spike variants including Alpha, Delta, Epsilon, Eta and A.23.1, but to a lesser extent Beta and Gamma. The DNA-only vaccine regimens were compared to a regimen that included co-immunization of Spike DNA and protein in the same anatomical site, the latter of which showed significant higher antibody responses. All vaccine regimens led to control of SARS-CoV-2 intranasal/intratracheal challenge and absence of virus dissemination to the lower respiratory tract. Vaccine-induced binding and neutralizing antibody titers and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis inversely correlated with transient virus levels in the nasal mucosa. Importantly, the Spike DNA+Protein co-immunization regimen induced the highest binding and neutralizing antibodies and showed the strongest control against SARS-CoV-2 challenge in rhesus macaques.


Subject(s)
Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, DNA , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , DNA, Viral/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Immunization, Passive , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Mice , RNA, Messenger/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/administration & dosage , Vaccines, DNA/immunology
14.
Antimicrob Agents Chemother ; 65(10): e0111721, 2021 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416578

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is a nucleoside monophosphoramidate prodrug that has been FDA approved for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the clinical efficacy of remdesivir for COVID-19 remains contentious, as several trials have not found statistically significant differences in either time to clinical improvement or mortality between remdesivir-treated and control groups. Similarly, the inability of remdesivir to provide a clinically significant benefit above other investigational agents in patients with Ebola contrasts with strong, curative preclinical data generated in rhesus macaque models. For both COVID-19 and Ebola, significant discordance between the robust preclinical data and remdesivir's lackluster clinical performance have left many puzzled. Here, we critically evaluate the assumptions of the models underlying remdesivir's promising preclinical data and show that such assumptions overpredict efficacy and minimize toxicity of remdesivir in humans. Had the limitations of in vitro drug efficacy testing and species differences in drug metabolism been considered, the underwhelming clinical performance of remdesivir for both COVID-19 and Ebola would have been fully anticipated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/drug therapy , Humans , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
15.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411075

ABSTRACT

We introduce an explicit function that describes virus-load curves on a patient-specific level. This function is based on simple and intuitive model parameters. It allows virus load analysis of acute viral infections without solving a full virus load dynamic model. We validate our model on data from mice influenza A, human rhinovirus data, human influenza A data, and monkey and human SARS-CoV-2 data. We find wide distributions for the model parameters, reflecting large variability in the disease outcomes between individuals. Further, we compare the virus load function to an established target model of virus dynamics, and we provide a new way to estimate the exponential growth rates of the corresponding infection phases. The virus load function, the target model, and the exponential approximations show excellent fits for the data considered. Our virus-load function offers a new way to analyze patient-specific virus load data, and it can be used as input for higher level models for the physiological effects of a virus infection, for models of tissue damage, and to estimate patient risks.


Subject(s)
Viral Load , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/etiology , Acute Disease , Algorithms , Animals , Biological Variation, Population , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/virology , Macaca mulatta , Mice , Models, Theoretical , Rhinovirus , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Virol ; 95(23): e0097421, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410203

ABSTRACT

The global COVID-19 pandemic has sparked intense interest in the rapid development of vaccines as well as animal models to evaluate vaccine candidates and to define immune correlates of protection. We recently reported a mouse-adapted SARS-CoV-2 virus strain (MA10) with the potential to infect wild-type laboratory mice, driving high levels of viral replication in respiratory tract tissues as well as severe clinical and respiratory symptoms, aspects of COVID-19 disease in humans that are important to capture in model systems. We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of novel rhesus adenovirus serotype 52 (RhAd52) vaccines against MA10 challenge in mice. Baseline seroprevalence is lower for rhesus adenovirus vectors than for human or chimpanzee adenovirus vectors, making these vectors attractive candidates for vaccine development. We observed that RhAd52 vaccines elicited robust binding and neutralizing antibody titers, which inversely correlated with viral replication after challenge. These data support the development of RhAd52 vaccines and the use of the MA10 challenge virus to screen novel vaccine candidates and to study the immunologic mechanisms that underscore protection from SARS-CoV-2 challenge in wild-type mice. IMPORTANCE We have developed a series of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines using rhesus adenovirus serotype 52 (RhAd52) vectors, which exhibit a lower seroprevalence than human and chimpanzee vectors, supporting their development as novel vaccine vectors or as an alternative adenovirus (Ad) vector for boosting. We sought to test these vaccines using a recently reported mouse-adapted SARS-CoV-2 (MA10) virus to (i) evaluate the protective efficacy of RhAd52 vaccines and (ii) further characterize this mouse-adapted challenge model and probe immune correlates of protection. We demonstrate that RhAd52 vaccines elicit robust SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody responses and protect against clinical disease and viral replication in the lungs. Further, binding and neutralizing antibody titers correlated with protective efficacy. These data validate the MA10 mouse model as a useful tool to screen and study novel vaccine candidates, as well as the development of RhAd52 vaccines for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Vaccines/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adenoviridae Infections/immunology , Adenoviruses, Simian/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Macaca mulatta/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vaccination
18.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(38)2021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392996

ABSTRACT

Emergence of novel variants of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) underscores the need for next-generation vaccines able to elicit broad and durable immunity. Here we report the evaluation of a ferritin nanoparticle vaccine displaying the receptor-binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (RFN) adjuvanted with Army Liposomal Formulation QS-21 (ALFQ). RFN vaccination of macaques using a two-dose regimen resulted in robust, predominantly Th1 CD4+ T cell responses and reciprocal peak mean serum neutralizing antibody titers of 14,000 to 21,000. Rapid control of viral replication was achieved in the upper and lower airways of animals after high-dose SARS-CoV-2 respiratory challenge, with undetectable replication within 4 d in seven of eight animals receiving 50 µg of RFN. Cross-neutralization activity against SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.351 decreased only approximately twofold relative to WA1/2020. In addition, neutralizing, effector antibody and cellular responses targeted the heterotypic SARS-CoV-1, highlighting the broad immunogenicity of RFN-ALFQ for SARS-CoV-like Sarbecovirus vaccine development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/virology , Macaca mulatta/immunology , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Ferritins/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
19.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 328, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392810

ABSTRACT

Understanding the pathological features of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in an animal model is crucial for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we compared immunopathological changes in young and old rhesus macaques (RMs) before and after SARS-CoV-2 infection at the tissue level. Quantitative analysis of multiplex immunofluorescence staining images of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections showed that SARS-CoV-2 infection specifically induced elevated levels of apoptosis, autophagy, and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)+ cells, and increased interferon α (IFN-α)- and interleukin 6 (IL-6)-secreting cells and C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3)+ cells in lung tissue of old RMs. This pathological pattern, which may be related to the age-related pro-inflammatory microenvironment in both lungs and spleens, was significantly correlated with the systemic accumulation of CXCR3+ cells in lungs, spleens, and peripheral blood. Furthermore, the ratio of CXCR3+ to T-box protein expression in T cell (T-bet)+ (CXCR3+/T-bet+ ratio) in CD8+ cells may be used as a predictor of severe COVID-19. These findings uncovered the impact of aging on the immunopathology of early SARS-CoV-2 infection and demonstrated the potential application of CXCR3+ cells in predicting severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cellular Microenvironment/immunology , Lung/immunology , Receptors, CXCR3/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male
20.
Front Immunol ; 12: 658428, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389178

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 virus causes upper and lower respiratory diseases including pneumonia, and in some cases, leads to lethal pulmonary failure. Angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), the receptor for cellular entry of SARS-CoV-2 virus, has been shown to protect against severe acute lung failure. Here, we provide evidence that SARS-CoV-2 spike protein S1 reduced the mRNA expression of ACE2 and type I interferons in primary cells of lung bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from naïve rhesus macaques. The expression levels of ACE2 and type I interferons were also found to be correlated with each other, consistent with the recent finding that ACE2 is an interferon-inducible gene. Furthermore, induction of ACE2 and type I interferons by poly I:C, an interferon inducer, was suppressed by S1 protein in primary cells of BAL. These observations suggest that the downregulation of ACE2 and type I interferons induced by S1 protein may directly contribute to SARS-CoV-2-associated lung diseases.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19 , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2
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