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1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 842535, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702591

ABSTRACT

Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are generated under biological stress such as cancer, inflammatory tissue damage, and viral infection. In recent years, with occurrence of global infectious diseases, new discovery on MDSCs functions has been significantly expanded during viral infection and COVID-19. For a successful viral infection, pathogens viruses develop immune evasion strategies to avoid immune recognition. Numerous viruses induce the differentiation and expansion of MDSCs in order to suppress host immune responses including natural killer cells, antigen presenting cells, and T-cells. Moreover, MDSCs play an important role in regulation of immunopathogenesis by balancing viral infection and tissue damage. In this review article, we describe the overview of immunomodulation and genetic regulation of MDSCs during viral infection in the animal model and human studies. In addition, we include up-to-date review of role of MDSCs in SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19. Finally, we discuss potential therapeutics targeting MDSCs.


Subject(s)
Immunomodulation/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immune Evasion/immunology , Macrophages/cytology , Monocytes/cytology , Monocytes/immunology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/cytology
2.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2022: 2523066, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662340

ABSTRACT

Pneumoconiosis is one of the most common occupational diseases in the world, and specific treatment methods of pneumoconiosis are lacking at present, so it carries great social and economic burdens. Pneumoconiosis, coronavirus disease 2019, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis all have similar typical pathological changes-pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disease characterized by excessive deposition of the extracellular matrix and remodeling of the lung tissue structure. Clarifying the pathogenesis of pneumoconiosis plays an important guiding role in its treatment. The occurrence and development of pneumoconiosis are accompanied by epigenetic factors (e.g., DNA methylation and noncoding RNA) changes, which in turn can promote or inhibit the process of pneumoconiosis. Here, we summarize epigenetic changes and functions in the several kinds of evidence classification (epidemiological investigation, in vivo, and in vitro experiments) and main types of cells (macrophages, fibroblasts, and alveolar epithelial cells) to provide some clues for finding specific therapeutic targets for pneumoconiosis and even for pulmonary fibrosis.


Subject(s)
Epigenesis, Genetic , Pneumoconiosis/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , DNA Methylation , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/metabolism , Pneumoconiosis/pathology , RNA, Untranslated/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
3.
Chem Commun (Camb) ; 58(13): 2120-2123, 2022 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639577

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is causing serious impacts in the world, and safe and effective vaccines and medicines are the best methods to combat the disease. The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein plays a key role in interacting with the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, and is regarded as an important target of vaccines. Herein, we constructed the adjuvant-protein conjugate Pam3CSK4-RBD as a vaccine candidate, in which the N-terminal of the RBD was site-selectively oxidized by transamination and conjugated with the TLR1/2 agonist Pam3CSK4. This demonstrated that the conjugation of Pam3CSK4 significantly enhanced the anti-RBD antibody response and cellular response. In addition, sera from the Pam3CSK4-RBD immunized group efficiently inhibited the binding of the RBD to ACE2 and protected cells from SARS-CoV-2 and four variants of concern (alpha, beta, gamma and delta), indicating that this adjuvant strategy could be one of the effective means for protein vaccine development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Lipopeptides/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Vaccines, Conjugate/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibody Formation , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Protein Binding , Protein Domains/immunology , RAW 264.7 Cells , Recombinant Proteins/biosynthesis , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vaccines, Conjugate/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Conjugate/chemistry
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24432, 2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585772

ABSTRACT

Despite the initial success of some drugs and vaccines targeting COVID-19, understanding the mechanism underlying SARS-CoV-2 disease pathogenesis remains crucial for the development of further approaches to treatment. Some patients with severe Covid-19 experience a cytokine storm and display evidence of inflammasome activation leading to increased levels of IL-1ß and IL-18; however, other reports have suggested reduced inflammatory responses to Sars-Cov-2. In this study we have examined the effects of the Sars-Cov-2 envelope (E) protein, a virulence factor in coronaviruses, on inflammasome activation and pulmonary inflammation. In cultured macrophages the E protein suppressed inflammasome priming and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Similarly, in mice transfected with E protein and treated with poly(I:C) to simulate the effects of viral RNA, the E protein, in an NLRP3-dependent fashion, reduced expression of pro-IL-1ß, levels of IL-1ß and IL-18 in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid, and macrophage infiltration in the lung. To simulate the effects of more advanced infection, macrophages were treated with both LPS and poly(I:C). In this setting the E protein increased NLRP3 inflammasome activation in both murine and human macrophages. Thus, the Sars-Cov-2 E protein may initially suppress the host NLRP3 inflammasome response to viral RNA while potentially increasing NLRP3 inflammasome responses in the later stages of infection. Targeting the Sars-Cov-2 E protein especially in the early stages of infection may represent a novel approach to Covid-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Humans , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/deficiency , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , Poly I-C/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
5.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 69-85, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In children, the acute pyelonephritis that can result from urinary tract infections (UTIs), which commonly ascend from the bladder to the kidney, is a growing concern because it poses a risk of renal scarring and irreversible loss of kidney function. To date, the cellular mechanisms underlying acute pyelonephritis-driven renal scarring remain unknown. METHODS: We used a preclinical model of uropathogenic Escherichia coli-induced acute pyelonephritis to determine the contribution of neutrophils and monocytes to resolution of the condition and the subsequent development of kidney fibrosis. We used cell-specific monoclonal antibodies to eliminate neutrophils, monocytes, or both. Bacterial ascent and the cell dynamics of phagocytic cells were assessed by biophotonic imaging and flow cytometry, respectively. We used quantitative RT-PCR and histopathologic analyses to evaluate inflammation and renal scarring. RESULTS: We found that neutrophils are critical to control bacterial ascent, which is in line with previous studies suggesting a protective role for neutrophils during a UTI, whereas monocyte-derived macrophages orchestrate a strong, but ineffective, inflammatory response against uropathogenic, E. coli-induced, acute pyelonephritis. Experimental neutropenia during acute pyelonephritis resulted in a compensatory increase in the number of monocytes and heightened macrophage-dependent inflammation in the kidney. Exacerbated macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses promoted renal scarring and compromised renal function, as indicated by elevated serum creatinine, BUN, and potassium. CONCLUSIONS: These findings reveal a previously unappreciated outcome for neutrophil-macrophage imbalance in promoting host susceptibility to acute pyelonephritis and the development of permanent renal damage. This suggests targeting dysregulated macrophage responses might be a therapeutic tool to prevent renal scarring during acute pyelonephritis.


Subject(s)
Cicatrix/physiopathology , Kidney/physiopathology , Macrophages/cytology , Neutrophils/cytology , Pyelonephritis/metabolism , Animals , Escherichia coli , Female , Fibrosis/microbiology , Fibrosis/physiopathology , Inflammation , Kidney/microbiology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C3H , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neutrophils/metabolism , Phagocytosis , Pyelonephritis/microbiology , Pyelonephritis/physiopathology , Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology , Urinary Tract Infections/physiopathology
6.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470935

ABSTRACT

Excessive host inflammation following infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is associated with severity and mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We recently reported that the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein S1 subunit (S1) induces pro-inflammatory responses by activating toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in macrophages. A standardized extract of Asparagus officinalis stem (EAS) is a unique functional food that elicits anti-photoaging effects by suppressing pro-inflammatory signaling in hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B-exposed skin fibroblasts. To elucidate its potential in preventing excessive inflammation in COVID-19, we examined the effects of EAS on pro-inflammatory responses in S1-stimulated macrophages. Murine peritoneal exudate macrophages were co-treated with EAS and S1. Concentrations and mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Expression and phosphorylation levels of signaling proteins were analyzed using western blotting and fluorescence immunomicroscopy. EAS significantly attenuated S1-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 in a concentration-dependent manner without reducing cell viability. EAS also markedly suppressed the S1-induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-1ß. However, among the TLR4 signaling proteins, EAS did not affect the degradation of inhibitor κBα, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase p54 subunit after S1 exposure. In contrast, EAS significantly suppressed S1-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Attenuation of S1-induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-1ß by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126 was greater than that by the Akt inhibitor perifosine, and the effects were potentiated by simultaneous treatment with both inhibitors. These results suggest that EAS attenuates S1-induced IL-6 and IL-1ß production by suppressing p44/42 MAPK and Akt signaling in macrophages. Therefore, EAS may be beneficial in regulating excessive inflammation in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Asparagus Plant/chemistry , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Macrophages/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Animals , Asparagus Plant/metabolism , Butadienes/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-6/genetics , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/metabolism , Nitriles/pharmacology , Phosphorylation/drug effects , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Stems/chemistry , Plant Stems/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/antagonists & inhibitors , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/pharmacology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects
7.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470798

ABSTRACT

Basophils and mast cells are among the principal inducers of Th2 responses and have a crucial role in allergic and anti-parasitic protective immunity. Basophils can function as antigen-presenting cells that bind antigens on their surface and boost humoral immune responses, inducing Th2 cell differentiation. Their depletion results in lower humoral memory activation and greater infection susceptibility. Basophils seem to have an active role upon immune response to SARS-CoV-2. In fact, a coordinate adaptive immune response to SARS-CoV-2 is magnified by basophils. It has been observed that basophil amount is lower during acute disease with respect to the recovery phase and that the grade of this depletion is an important determinant of the antibody response to the virus. Moreover, mast cells, present in a great quantity in the nasal epithelial and lung cells, participate in the first immune response to SARS-CoV-2. Their activation results in a hyperinflammatory syndrome through the release of inflammatory molecules, participating to the "cytokine storm" and, in a longer period, inducing pulmonary fibrosis. The literature data suggest that basophil counts may be a useful prognostic tool for COVID-19, since their reduction is associated with a worse prognosis. Mast cells, on the other hand, represent a possible therapeutic target for reducing the airway inflammation characteristic of the hyperacute phase of the disease.


Subject(s)
Basophils/cytology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Mast Cells/cytology , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , COVID-19/blood , Cell Differentiation , Cytokines/metabolism , Granulocytes/cytology , Humans , Hypersensitivity/metabolism , Immune System , Immunity, Humoral , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Macrophages/cytology , Mice , SARS-CoV-2 , Th17 Cells/cytology , Th2 Cells/cytology
8.
Thyroid ; 31(12): 1766-1775, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429167

ABSTRACT

Background: Thyroid dysfunctions have been reported after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. However, the biological mechanisms behind these conditions remain unexplored. Herein, we report on changes of the immune transcriptome in autoptic thyroid tissues of people who have died from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: Twenty-five autoptic thyroid specimens of subjects dying from COVID-19 were investigated. Eleven autoptic thyroid specimens of subjects dying from causes other than infectious conditions served as controls. RNA transcripts of 770 immune-related genes together with RNA genomes of multiple coronavirus types were measured by the nCounter system. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for two SARS-CoV-2 genes was used to assess virus positivity. Results were validated by immunohistochemistry. Results: The SARS-CoV-2 genome and antigens were detected in 9 of 25 (36%) thyroid specimens from the COVID-19 cohort. Virus-negative thyroid tissues from COVID-19 subject did not show changes of gene transcription nor significant numbers of infiltrating immune cells. Conversely, SARS-CoV-2-positive thyroid specimens showed marked upregulation of immune genes, especially those proper of the type I and type II interferon (IFN) pathways. In infected tissues, infiltrates of innate immune cells (macrophages and polymorphonuclear neutrophils) were prevalent. Conclusions: The thyroid gland can be directly infected by the SARS-CoV-2. Infection strongly activates IFN pathways. The direct viral insult combined with an intense immune response may trigger or worsen thyroid conditions in predisposed individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Thyroid Gland/metabolism , Thyroid Gland/virology , Adult , Aged , Autopsy , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Death , Female , Genome, Viral , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Macrophages/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/cytology , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Thyroid Gland/immunology
9.
FASEB J ; 35(10): e21843, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378886

ABSTRACT

Robust inflammatory responses are critical to survival following respiratory infection, with current attention focused on the clinical consequences of the Coronavirus pandemic. Epigenetic factors are increasingly recognized as important determinants of immune responses, and EZH2 is a prominent target due to the availability of highly specific and efficacious antagonists. However, very little is known about the role of EZH2 in the myeloid lineage. Here, we show EZH2 acts in macrophages to limit inflammatory responses to activation, and in neutrophils for chemotaxis. Selective genetic deletion in macrophages results in a remarkable gain in protection from infection with the prevalent lung pathogen, pneumococcus. In contrast, neutrophils lacking EZH2 showed impaired mobility in response to chemotactic signals, and resulted in increased susceptibility to pneumococcus. In summary, EZH2 shows complex, and divergent roles in different myeloid lineages, likely contributing to the earlier conflicting reports. Compounds targeting EZH2 are likely to impair mucosal immunity; however, they may prove useful for conditions driven by pulmonary neutrophil influx, such as adult respiratory distress syndrome.


Subject(s)
Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 Protein/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Macrophages/cytology , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neutrophils/cytology
10.
Cell Rep ; 36(8): 109614, 2021 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370458

ABSTRACT

Zoonotic pathogens, such as COVID-19, reside in animal hosts before jumping species to infect humans. The Carnivora, like mink, carry many zoonoses, yet how diversity in host immune genes across species affect pathogen carriage is poorly understood. Here, we describe a progressive evolutionary downregulation of pathogen-sensing inflammasome pathways in Carnivora. This includes the loss of nucleotide-oligomerization domain leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLRs), acquisition of a unique caspase-1/-4 effector fusion protein that processes gasdermin D pore formation without inducing rapid lytic cell death, and the formation of a caspase-8 containing inflammasome that inefficiently processes interleukin-1ß. Inflammasomes regulate gut immunity, but the carnivorous diet has antimicrobial properties that could compensate for the loss of these immune pathways. We speculate that the consequences of systemic inflammasome downregulation, however, can impair host sensing of specific pathogens such that they can reside undetected in the Carnivora.


Subject(s)
Carnivora/metabolism , Evolution, Molecular , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Zoonoses/pathology , Animals , Caspase 1/genetics , Caspase 1/metabolism , Caspase 8/metabolism , Caspases, Initiator/genetics , Caspases, Initiator/metabolism , Cell Death , Cell Line , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , NLR Proteins/genetics , NLR Proteins/metabolism , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/biosynthesis , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Salmonella typhi/pathogenicity , Zoonoses/immunology , Zoonoses/parasitology
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304673

ABSTRACT

Macrophages (Mφs) are instrumental regulators of the immune response whereby they acquire diverse functional phenotypes following their exposure to microenvironmental cues that govern their differentiation from monocytes and their activation. The complexity and diversity of the mycobacterial cell wall have empowered mycobacteria with potent immunomodulatory capacities. A heat-killed (HK) whole-cell preparation of Mycobacterium obuense (M. obuense) has shown promise as an adjunctive immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer. Moreover, HK M. obuense has been shown to trigger the differentiation of human monocytes into a monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) type named Mob-MDM. However, the transcriptomic profile and functional properties of Mob-MDMs remain undefined during an activation state. Here, we characterized cytokine/chemokine release patterns and transcriptomic profiles of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon γ (IFNγ)-activated human MDMs that were differentiated with HK M. obuense (Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)), macrophage colony-stimulating factor M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)), or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)). Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) demonstrated a unique cytokine/chemokine release pattern (interleukin (IL)-10low, IL-12/23p40low, IL-23p19/p40low, chemokine (C-x-C) motif ligand (CXCL)9low) that was distinct from those of M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) and GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ). Furthermore, M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) maintained IL-10 production at significantly higher levels compared to GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) and Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) despite being activated with M1-Mφ-activating stimuli. Comparative RNA sequencing analysis pointed to a distinct transcriptome profile for Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) relative to both M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) and GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) that comprised 417 transcripts. Functional gene-set enrichment analysis revealed significant overrepresentation of signaling pathways and biological processes that were uniquely related to Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ). Our findings lay a foundation for the potential integration of HK M. obuense in specific cell-based immunotherapeutic modalities such as adoptive transfer of Mφs (Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)) for cancer treatment.


Subject(s)
Chemokines/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Macrophages/immunology , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria/immunology , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Cell Differentiation/immunology , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/pharmacokinetics , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , In Vitro Techniques , Interferon-gamma/pharmacology , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophage Activation/drug effects , Macrophage Activation/immunology , Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Transcriptome
12.
Immunity ; 54(6): 1200-1218.e9, 2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213288

ABSTRACT

Tissue macrophages self-renew during homeostasis and produce inflammatory mediators upon microbial infection. We examined the relationship between proliferative and inflammatory properties of tissue macrophages by defining the impact of the Wnt/ß-catenin pathway, a central regulator of self-renewal, in alveolar macrophages (AMs). Activation of ß-catenin by Wnt ligand inhibited AM proliferation and stemness, but promoted inflammatory activity. In a murine influenza viral pneumonia model, ß-catenin-mediated AM inflammatory activity promoted acute host morbidity; in contrast, AM proliferation enabled repopulation of reparative AMs and tissue recovery following viral clearance. Mechanistically, Wnt treatment promoted ß-catenin-HIF-1α interaction and glycolysis-dependent inflammation while suppressing mitochondrial metabolism and thereby, AM proliferation. Differential HIF-1α activities distinguished proliferative and inflammatory AMs in vivo. This ß-catenin-HIF-1α axis was conserved in human AMs and enhanced HIF-1α expression associated with macrophage inflammation in COVID-19 patients. Thus, inflammatory and reparative activities of lung macrophages are regulated by ß-catenin-HIF-1α signaling, with implications for the treatment of severe respiratory diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Self Renewal/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Humans , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/metabolism , Signal Transduction
13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 353, 2021 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190057

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The primary objective of the study is to describe the cellular characteristics of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of COVID-19 patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation; the secondary outcome is to describe BALF findings between survivors vs non-survivors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients positive for SARS-CoV-2 RT PCR, admitted to ICU between March and April 2020 were enrolled. At ICU admission, BALF were analyzed by flow cytometry. Univariate, multivariate and Spearman correlation analyses were performed. RESULTS: Sixty-four patients were enrolled, median age of 64 years (IQR 58-69). The majority cells in the BALF were neutrophils (70%, IQR 37.5-90.5) and macrophages (27%, IQR 7-49) while a minority were lymphocytes, 1%, TCD3+ 92% (IQR 82-95). The ICU mortality was 32.8%. Non-survivors had a significantly older age (p = 0.033) and peripheral lymphocytes (p = 0.012) were lower compared to the survivors. At multivariate analysis the percentage of macrophages in the BALF correlated with poor outcome (OR 1.336, CI95% 1.014-1.759, p = 0.039). CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients, BALF cellularity is mainly composed of neutrophils and macrophages. The macrophages percentage in the BALF at ICU admittance correlated with higher ICU mortality. The lack of lymphocytes in BALF could partly explain a reduced anti-viral response.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Leukocyte Count , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Respiration, Artificial , Adult , Aged , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Italy/epidemiology , Lymphocytes/cytology , Macrophages/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/cytology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Outcome
14.
Chem Res Toxicol ; 34(4): 952-958, 2021 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132015

ABSTRACT

Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis and is the most commonly acquired heart disease among children in many countries, which was first reported 50 years ago in Japan. The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)) has been a pandemic in most of the world since 2020, and since late 2019 in China. Kawasaki-like disease caused by COVID-19 shares some symptoms with KD, referred to as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, and has been reported in the United States, Italy, France, England, and other areas of Europe, with an almost 6-10 times or more increase compared with previous years of KD prevalence. Hydrogen gas is a stable and efficient antioxidant, which has a positive effect on oxidative damage, inflammation, cell apoptosis, and abnormal blood vessel inflammation. This review reports the chemical and biochemical aspects of hydrogen gas inhalation in treating KD and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydrogen/therapeutic use , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/drug therapy , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Hydrogen/chemistry , Hydrogen/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/epidemiology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/pathology , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
15.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 546: 97-102, 2021 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062239

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus causes elevated production of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) markers by macrophages. SARS-CoV-2 enters macrophages through its Spike-protein aided by cathepsin (Cat) B and L, which also mediate SASP production. Since M-CSF and IL-34 control macrophage differentiation, we investigated the age-dependent effects of the Spike-protein on SASP-related pro-inflammatory-cytokines and nuclear-senescence-regulatory-factors, and CatB, L and K, in mouse M-CSF- and IL-34-differentiated macrophages. The Spike-protein upregulated SASP expression in young and aged male M-CSF-macrophages. In contrast, only young and aged male IL-34-macrophages demonstrated significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in response to the Spike-protein in vitro. Furthermore, the S-protein elevated CatB expression in young male M-CSF-macrophages and young female IL-34-macrophages, whereas CatL was overexpressed in young male IL-34- and old male M-CSF-macrophages. Surprisingly, the S-protein increased CatK activity in young and aged male M-CSF-macrophages, indicating that CatK may be also involved in the COVID-19 pathology. Altogether, we demonstrated the age- and sex-dependent effects of the Spike-protein on M-CSF and IL-34-macrophages using a novel in vitro mouse model of SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Macrophages/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/pharmacology , Animals , Cathepsins/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Cellular Senescence , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Interleukins , Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor , Macrophages/cytology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
16.
EBioMedicine ; 59: 102964, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733877

ABSTRACT

Mononuclear phagocytes are a widely distributed family of cells contributing to innate and adaptive immunity. Circulating monocytes and tissue macrophages participate in all stages of SARS COVID-19. They contribute to comorbidities predisposing to clinical infection, virus resistance and dissemination, and to host factors that determine disease severity, recovery and sequelae. Assays are available to detect viral infection and antibody responses, but no adequate tests have been developed to measure the activation level of monocytes and tissue macrophages, and the risk of progression to a fatal hyperinflammatory syndrome. Blood monocytes provide a window on the systemic immune response, from production to tissue recruitment, reflecting the impact of infection on the host. Ready availability of blood makes it possible to monitor severity and the risk of potentially lethal complications, by developing tests to assess the status of monocyte activation and its potential for further inflammatory dysregulation after recruitment to tissues and during recovery.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Monocytes/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/metabolism , Monocytes/cytology , Monocytes/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
17.
J Biol Chem ; 295(41): 14040-14052, 2020 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704089

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses have caused several zoonotic infections in the past two decades, leading to significant morbidity and mortality globally. Balanced regulation of cell death and inflammatory immune responses is essential to promote protection against coronavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms that control these processes remain to be resolved. Here we demonstrate that infection with the murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) activated the NLRP3 inflammasome and inflammatory cell death in the form of PANoptosis. Deleting NLRP3 inflammasome components or the downstream cell death executioner gasdermin D (GSDMD) led to an initial reduction in cell death followed by a robust increase in the incidence of caspase-8- and receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated inflammatory cell deathafter coronavirus infection. Additionally, loss of GSDMD promoted robust NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, the amounts of some cytokines released during coronavirus infection were significantly altered in the absence of GSDMD. Altogether, our findings show that inflammatory cell death, PANoptosis, is induced by coronavirus infection and that impaired NLRP3 inflammasome function or pyroptosis can lead to negative consequences for the host. These findings may have important implications for studies of coronavirus-induced disease.


Subject(s)
Caspase 8/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Pyroptosis , Receptor-Interacting Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , Necroptosis , Phosphate-Binding Proteins/genetics , Phosphate-Binding Proteins/metabolism
18.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(13)2020 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635461

ABSTRACT

By attaching to the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) protein on lung and intestinal cells, Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV-2) can cause respiratory and homeostatic difficulties leading to sepsis. The progression from acute respiratory failure to sepsis has been correlated with the release of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1). Lack of effective conventional treatment of this septic state has spiked an interest in alternative medicine. This review of herbal extracts has identified multiple candidates which can target the release of HMGB1 and potentially reduce mortality by preventing progression from respiratory distress to sepsis. Some of the identified mixtures have also been shown to interfere with viral attachment. Due to the wide variability in chemical superstructure of the components of assorted herbal extracts, common motifs have been identified. Looking at the most active compounds in each extract it becomes evident that as a group, phenolic compounds have a broad enzyme inhibiting function. They have been shown to act against the priming of SARS-CoV-2 attachment proteins by host and viral enzymes, and the release of HMGB1 by host immune cells. An argument for the value in a nonspecific inhibitory action has been drawn. Hopefully these findings can drive future drug development and clinical procedures.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , HMGB1 Protein/metabolism , Respiratory Insufficiency/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , HMGB1 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Humans , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages/virology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Plant Exudates/chemistry , Plant Exudates/pharmacology , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Plants, Medicinal/metabolism , Respiratory Insufficiency/metabolism , Respiratory Insufficiency/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/metabolism , Sepsis/prevention & control , Virus Internalization/drug effects
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(11)2020 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-382126

ABSTRACT

In late December 2019, a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2 or CoV-19) appeared in Wuhan, China, causing a global pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 causes mild to severe respiratory tract inflammation, often developing into lung fibrosis with thrombosis in pulmonary small vessels and causing even death. COronaVIrus Disease (COVID-19) patients manifest exacerbated inflammatory and immune responses, cytokine storm, prevalence of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and increased levels of resident and circulating immune cells. Men show higher susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection than women, likely due to estrogens production. The protective role of estrogens, as well as an immune-suppressive activity that limits the excessive inflammation, can be mediated by cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2). The role of this receptor in modulating inflammation and immune response is well documented in fact in several settings. The stimulation of CB2 receptors is known to limit the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, shift the macrophage phenotype towards the anti-inflammatory M2 type and enhance the immune-modulating properties of mesenchymal stromal cells. For these reasons, we hypothesize that CB2 receptor can be a therapeutic target in COVID-19 pandemic emergency.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Estrogens/chemistry , Estrogens/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB2/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(11)2020 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-382033

ABSTRACT

At present, there is no vaccine or effective standard treatment for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection (or coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19)), which frequently leads to lethal pulmonary inflammatory responses. COVID-19 pathology is characterized by extreme inflammation and amplified immune response with activation of a cytokine storm. A subsequent progression to acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can take place, which is often followed by death. The causes of these strong inflammatory responses in SARS-CoV-2 infection are still unknown. As uncontrolled pulmonary inflammation is likely the main cause of death in SARS-CoV-2 infection, anti-inflammatory therapeutic interventions are particularly important. Fenretinide N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide is a bioactive molecule characterized by poly-pharmacological properties and a low toxicity profile. Fenretinide is endowed with antitumor, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and immunomodulating properties other than efficacy in obesity/diabetic pathologies. Its anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities, in particular, could likely have utility in multimodal therapies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS in COVID-19 patients. Moreover, fenretinide administration by pulmonary delivery systems could further increase its therapeutic value by carrying high drug concentrations to the lungs and triggering a rapid onset of activity. This is particularly important in SARS-CoV-2 infection, where only a narrow time window exists for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Fenretinide/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines , Fenretinide/pharmacology , Humans , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory System/drug effects , Respiratory System/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/drug effects
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