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2.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 11078, 2022 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1908298

ABSTRACT

Immune cell chemotaxis to the sites of pathogen invasion is critical for fighting infection, but in life-threatening conditions such as sepsis and Covid-19, excess activation of the innate immune system is thought to cause a damaging invasion of immune cells into tissues and a consequent excessive release of cytokines, chemokines and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In these circumstances, tempering excessive activation of the innate immune system may, paradoxically, promote recovery. Here we identify the antimalarial compound artemisinin as a potent and selective inhibitor of neutrophil and macrophage chemotaxis induced by a range of chemotactic agents. Artemisinin released calcium from intracellular stores in a similar way to thapsigargin, a known inhibitor of the Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase pump (SERCA), but unlike thapsigargin, artemisinin blocks only the SERCA3 isoform. Inhibition of SERCA3 by artemisinin was irreversible and was inhibited by iron chelation, suggesting iron-catalysed alkylation of a specific cysteine residue in SERCA3 as the mechanism by which artemisinin inhibits neutrophil motility. In murine infection models, artemisinin potently suppressed neutrophil invasion into both peritoneum and lung in vivo and inhibited the release of cytokines/chemokines and NETs. This work suggests that artemisinin may have value as a therapy in conditions such as sepsis and Covid-19 in which over-activation of the innate immune system causes tissue injury that can lead to death.


Subject(s)
Artemisinins , COVID-19 , Extracellular Traps , Macrophages , Neutrophils , Sepsis , Animals , Artemisinins/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Calcium/metabolism , Calcium-Transporting ATPases/metabolism , Chemotaxis/drug effects , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Cytokines/metabolism , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Neutrophils/drug effects , Neutrophils/metabolism , Thapsigargin/pharmacology
3.
J Virol ; 96(7): e0005722, 2022 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759284

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused over 5 million deaths worldwide. Pneumonia and systemic inflammation contribute to its high mortality. Many viruses use heparan sulfate proteoglycans as coreceptors for viral entry, and heparanase (HPSE) is a known regulator of both viral entry and inflammatory cytokines. We evaluated the heparanase inhibitor Roneparstat, a modified heparin with minimum anticoagulant activity, in pathophysiology and therapy for COVID-19. We found that Roneparstat significantly decreased the infectivity of SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1, and retroviruses (human T-lymphotropic virus 1 [HTLV-1] and HIV-1) in vitro. Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) analysis of cells from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of COVID-19 patients revealed a marked increase in HPSE gene expression in CD68+ macrophages compared to healthy controls. Elevated levels of HPSE expression in macrophages correlated with the severity of COVID-19 and the expression of inflammatory cytokine genes, including IL6, TNF, IL1B, and CCL2. In line with this finding, we found a marked induction of HPSE and numerous inflammatory cytokines in human macrophages challenged with SARS-CoV-2 S1 protein. Treatment with Roneparstat significantly attenuated SARS-CoV-2 S1 protein-mediated inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages, through disruption of NF-κB signaling. HPSE knockdown in a macrophage cell line also showed diminished inflammatory cytokine production during S1 protein challenge. Taken together, this study provides a proof of concept that heparanase is a target for SARS-CoV-2-mediated pathogenesis and that Roneparstat may serve as a dual-targeted therapy to reduce viral infection and inflammation in COVID-19. IMPORTANCE The complex pathogenesis of COVID-19 consists of two major pathological phases: an initial infection phase elicited by SARS-CoV-2 entry and replication and an inflammation phase that could lead to tissue damage, which can evolve into acute respiratory failure or even death. While the development and deployment of vaccines are ongoing, effective therapy for COVID-19 is still urgently needed. In this study, we explored HPSE blockade with Roneparstat, a phase I clinically tested HPSE inhibitor, in the context of COVID-19 pathogenesis. Treatment with Roneparstat showed wide-spectrum anti-infection activities against SARS-CoV-2, HTLV-1, and HIV-1 in vitro. In addition, HPSE blockade with Roneparstat significantly attenuated SARS-CoV-2 S1 protein-induced inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages through disruption of NF-κB signaling. Together, this study provides a proof of principle for the use of Roneparstat as a dual-targeting therapy for COVID-19 to decrease viral infection and dampen the proinflammatory immune response mediated by macrophages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heparin/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line , Cytokines/metabolism , Fenofibrate , Gene Knockdown Techniques , Glucuronidase/genetics , Glucuronidase/metabolism , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunity/drug effects , Inflammation , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , NF-kappa B , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744920

ABSTRACT

Involvement of macrophages in the SARS-CoV-2-associated cytokine storm, the excessive secretion of inflammatory/anti-viral factors leading to the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19 patients, is unclear. In this study, we sought to characterize the interplay between the virus and primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). MDM were stimulated with recombinant IFN-α and/or infected with either live or UV-inactivated SARS-CoV-2 or with two reassortant influenza viruses containing external genes from the H1N1 PR8 strain and heterologous internal genes from a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 or a low pathogenic human seasonal H1N1 strain. Virus replication was monitored by qRT-PCR for the E viral gene for SARS-CoV-2 or M gene for influenza and TCID50 or plaque assay, and cytokine levels were assessed semiquantitatively with qRT-PCR and a proteome cytokine array. We report that MDM are not susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 whereas both influenza viruses replicated in MDM, albeit abortively. We observed a modest cytokine response in SARS-CoV-2 exposed MDM with notable absence of IFN-ß induction, which was instead strongly induced by the influenza viruses. Pre-treatment of MDM with IFN-α enhanced proinflammatory cytokine expression upon exposure to virus. Together, the findings concur that the hyperinflammation observed in SARS-CoV-2 infection is not driven by macrophages.


Subject(s)
Inflammation/virology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Replication/genetics , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , Cells, Cultured , Cytokines/analysis , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/immunology , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , Macrophages/drug effects , Male , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674674

ABSTRACT

Preventing the cytokine storm observed in COVID-19 is a crucial goal for reducing the occurrence of severe acute respiratory failure and improving outcomes. Here, we identify Aldo-Keto Reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10) as a key enzyme involved in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The analysis of transcriptomic data from lung samples of patients who died from COVID-19 demonstrates an increased expression of the gene encoding AKR1B10. Measurements of the AKR1B10 protein in sera from hospitalised COVID-19 patients suggests a significant link between AKR1B10 levels and the severity of the disease. In macrophages and lung cells, the over-expression of AKR1B10 induces the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß) and Tumor Necrosis Factor a (TNFα), supporting the biological plausibility of an AKR1B10 involvement in the COVID-19-related cytokine storm. When macrophages were stressed by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) exposure and treated by Zopolrestat, an AKR1B10 inhibitor, the LPS-induced production of IL-6, IL-1ß, and TNFα is significantly reduced, reinforcing the hypothesis that the pro-inflammatory expression of cytokines is AKR1B10-dependant. Finally, we also show that AKR1B10 can be secreted and transferred via extracellular vesicles between different cell types, suggesting that this protein may also contribute to the multi-organ systemic impact of COVID-19. These experiments highlight a relationship between AKR1B10 production and severe forms of COVID-19. Our data indicate that AKR1B10 participates in the activation of cytokines production and suggest that modulation of AKR1B10 activity might be an actionable pharmacological target in COVID-19 management.


Subject(s)
Aldo-Keto Reductases/physiology , COVID-19/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Aldo-Keto Reductases/antagonists & inhibitors , Aldo-Keto Reductases/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Cells, Cultured , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Humans , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Patient Acuity , RAW 264.7 Cells , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transcriptome
6.
Pharmacol Res ; 176: 106083, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638968

ABSTRACT

The pathogenic hyper-inflammatory response has been revealed as the major cause of the severity and death of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Xuanfei Baidu Decoction (XFBD) as one of the "three medicines and three prescriptions" for the clinically effective treatment of COVID-19 in China, shows unique advantages in the control of symptomatic transition from moderate to severe disease states. However, the roles of XFBD to against hyper-inflammatory response and its mechanism remain unclear. Here, we established acute lung injury (ALI) model induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), presenting a hyperinflammatory process to explore the pharmacodynamic effect and molecular mechanism of XFBD on ALI. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that XFBD inhibited the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and iNOS activity in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. In vivo, we confirmed that XFBD improved pulmonary injury via down-regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α and IL1-ß as well as macrophages and neutrophils infiltration in LPS-induced ALI mice. Mechanically, we revealed that XFBD treated LPS-induced acute lung injury through PD-1/IL17A pathway which regulates the infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. Additionally, one major compound from XFBD, i.e. glycyrrhizic acid, shows a high binding affinity with IL17A. In conclusion, we demonstrated the therapeutic effects of XFBD, which provides the immune foundations of XFBD and fatherly support its clinical applications.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Interleukin-17/metabolism , Macrophages/drug effects , Neutrophils/drug effects , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Line , China , Cytokines/metabolism , Leukocyte Count/methods , Macrophages/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neutrophils/metabolism , RAW 264.7 Cells
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24432, 2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585772

ABSTRACT

Despite the initial success of some drugs and vaccines targeting COVID-19, understanding the mechanism underlying SARS-CoV-2 disease pathogenesis remains crucial for the development of further approaches to treatment. Some patients with severe Covid-19 experience a cytokine storm and display evidence of inflammasome activation leading to increased levels of IL-1ß and IL-18; however, other reports have suggested reduced inflammatory responses to Sars-Cov-2. In this study we have examined the effects of the Sars-Cov-2 envelope (E) protein, a virulence factor in coronaviruses, on inflammasome activation and pulmonary inflammation. In cultured macrophages the E protein suppressed inflammasome priming and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Similarly, in mice transfected with E protein and treated with poly(I:C) to simulate the effects of viral RNA, the E protein, in an NLRP3-dependent fashion, reduced expression of pro-IL-1ß, levels of IL-1ß and IL-18 in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid, and macrophage infiltration in the lung. To simulate the effects of more advanced infection, macrophages were treated with both LPS and poly(I:C). In this setting the E protein increased NLRP3 inflammasome activation in both murine and human macrophages. Thus, the Sars-Cov-2 E protein may initially suppress the host NLRP3 inflammasome response to viral RNA while potentially increasing NLRP3 inflammasome responses in the later stages of infection. Targeting the Sars-Cov-2 E protein especially in the early stages of infection may represent a novel approach to Covid-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Humans , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/deficiency , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , Poly I-C/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
Eur J Med Chem ; 229: 114002, 2022 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517139

ABSTRACT

Compounds targeting the inflammasome-caspase-1 pathway could be of use for the treatment of inflammation and inflammatory diseases. Previous caspase-1 inhibitors were in great majority covalent inhibitors and failed in clinical trials. Using a mixed modelling, computational screening, synthesis and in vitro testing approach, we identified a novel class of non-covalent caspase-1 non cytotoxic inhibitors which are able to inhibit IL-1ß release in activated macrophages in the low µM range, in line with the best activities observed for the known covalent inhibitors. Our compounds could form the basis of further optimization towards potent drugs for the treatment of inflammation and inflammatory disorders including also dysregulated inflammation in Covid 19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/chemical synthesis , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Caspase 1/drug effects , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Inflammation/drug therapy , Serpins/chemical synthesis , Serpins/pharmacology , Tetrazoles/chemical synthesis , Tetrazoles/therapeutic use , Viral Proteins/chemical synthesis , Viral Proteins/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Cell Division/drug effects , Drug Design , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Tetrazoles/pharmacology , U937 Cells
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 656419, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506563

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) is the global health problem with the second highest number of deaths from a communicable disease after COVID-19. Although TB is curable, poor health infrastructure, long and grueling TB treatments have led to the spread of TB pandemic with alarmingly increasing multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB prevalence. Alternative host modulating therapies can be employed to improve TB drug efficacies or dampen the exaggerated inflammatory responses to improve lung function. Here, we investigated the adjunct therapy of natural immune-modulatory compound berberine in C57BL/6 mouse model of pulmonary TB. Berberine treatment did not affect Mtb growth in axenic cultures; however, it showed increased bacterial killing in primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. Ad libitum berberine administration was beneficial to the host in combination with rifampicin and isoniazid. Berberine adjunctive treatment resulted in decreased lung pathology with no additive or synergistic effects on bacterial burdens in mice. Lung immune cell flow cytometry analysis showed that adjunctive berberine treatment decreased neutrophil, CD11b+ dendritic cell and recruited interstitial macrophage numbers. Late onset of adjunctive berberine treatment resulted in a similar phenotype with consistently reduced numbers of neutrophils both in lungs and the spleen. Together, our results suggest that berberine can be supplemented as an immunomodulatory agent depending on the disease stage and inflammatory status of the host.


Subject(s)
Antitubercular Agents/therapeutic use , Berberine/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Isoniazid/therapeutic use , Rifampin/therapeutic use , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Animals , Antitubercular Agents/pharmacology , Berberine/pharmacology , Cytokines/immunology , Dendritic Cells/drug effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Isoniazid/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Mice, Inbred C3H , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/growth & development , Neutrophils/drug effects , Neutrophils/immunology , Rifampin/pharmacology , Spleen/drug effects , Spleen/immunology , Spleen/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/immunology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/pathology
11.
J Immunol ; 207(9): 2310-2324, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497461

ABSTRACT

IFN-γ, a proinflammatory cytokine produced primarily by T cells and NK cells, activates macrophages and engages mechanisms to control pathogens. Although there is evidence of IFN-γ production by murine macrophages, IFN-γ production by normal human macrophages and their subsets remains unknown. Herein, we show that human M1 macrophages generated by IFN-γ and IL-12- and IL-18-stimulated monocyte-derived macrophages (M0) produce significant levels of IFN-γ. Further stimulation of IL-12/IL-18-primed macrophages or M1 macrophages with agonists for TLR-2, TLR-3, or TLR-4 significantly enhanced IFN-γ production in contrast to the similarly stimulated M0, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages. Similarly, M1 macrophages generated from COVID-19-infected patients' macrophages produced IFN-γ that was enhanced following LPS stimulation. The inhibition of M1 differentiation by Jak inhibitors reversed LPS-induced IFN-γ production, suggesting that differentiation with IFN-γ plays a key role in IFN-γ induction. We subsequently investigated the signaling pathway(s) responsible for TLR-4-induced IFN-γ production in M1 macrophages. Our results show that TLR-4-induced IFN-γ production is regulated by the ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) through the activation of PI3K, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2), and the JNK MAPK pathways. These results suggest that M1-derived IFN-γ may play a key role in inflammation that may be augmented following bacterial/viral infections. Moreover, blocking the mTORC1/2, PI3K, and JNK MAPKs in macrophages may be of potential translational significance in preventing macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Interferon-gamma/biosynthesis , Macrophages/drug effects , Poly I-C/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/immunology , Lipopolysaccharides/antagonists & inhibitors , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/immunology , Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa/antagonists & inhibitors , Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa/immunology , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/agonists
12.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 101(Pt A): 108264, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487769

ABSTRACT

Topoisomerase (TOP) inhibitors were commonly used as chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancers. In our present study, we found that etoposide (ETO), a topoisomerase 2 (TOP2) inhibitor, upregulated the production of Interleukin 10 (IL-10) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Besides, other TOP2 inhibitors including doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and teniposide (TEN) were also able to augment IL-10 production. Meanwhile, the expression levels of pro-inflammatory factors, for example IL-6 and TNF-α, were also decreased accordingly by the treatment of the TOP2 inhibitors. Of note, ETO facilitated IL-10 secretion, which might be regulated by transcription factor Maf via PI3K/AKT pathway, as pharmaceutic blockage of kinase PI3K or AKT attenuated ETO-induced Maf and IL-10 expression. Further, in LPS-induced mice sepsis model, the enhanced generation of IL-10 was observed in ETO-treated mice, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokines were decreased, which significantly reduced the mortality of mice from LPS-induced lethal cytokine storm. Taken together, these results indicated that ETO may exhibit an anti-inflammatory role by upregulating the alteration of transcription factor Maf and promoting subsequential IL-10 secretion via PI3K/Akt pathway in LPS-induced macrophages. Therefore, ETO may serve as a potential anti-inflammatory agent and employed to severe pro-inflammatory diseases including COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Etoposide/pharmacology , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-maf/genetics , Topoisomerase II Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line , Disease Models, Animal , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Etoposide/therapeutic use , Female , Interleukin-10/genetics , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Macrophages/drug effects , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-maf/metabolism , Shock, Septic/chemically induced , Shock, Septic/drug therapy , Topoisomerase II Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Up-Regulation/drug effects
13.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470935

ABSTRACT

Excessive host inflammation following infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is associated with severity and mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We recently reported that the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein S1 subunit (S1) induces pro-inflammatory responses by activating toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in macrophages. A standardized extract of Asparagus officinalis stem (EAS) is a unique functional food that elicits anti-photoaging effects by suppressing pro-inflammatory signaling in hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B-exposed skin fibroblasts. To elucidate its potential in preventing excessive inflammation in COVID-19, we examined the effects of EAS on pro-inflammatory responses in S1-stimulated macrophages. Murine peritoneal exudate macrophages were co-treated with EAS and S1. Concentrations and mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Expression and phosphorylation levels of signaling proteins were analyzed using western blotting and fluorescence immunomicroscopy. EAS significantly attenuated S1-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 in a concentration-dependent manner without reducing cell viability. EAS also markedly suppressed the S1-induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-1ß. However, among the TLR4 signaling proteins, EAS did not affect the degradation of inhibitor κBα, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase p54 subunit after S1 exposure. In contrast, EAS significantly suppressed S1-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Attenuation of S1-induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-1ß by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126 was greater than that by the Akt inhibitor perifosine, and the effects were potentiated by simultaneous treatment with both inhibitors. These results suggest that EAS attenuates S1-induced IL-6 and IL-1ß production by suppressing p44/42 MAPK and Akt signaling in macrophages. Therefore, EAS may be beneficial in regulating excessive inflammation in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Asparagus Plant/chemistry , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Macrophages/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Animals , Asparagus Plant/metabolism , Butadienes/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-6/genetics , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/metabolism , Nitriles/pharmacology , Phosphorylation/drug effects , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Stems/chemistry , Plant Stems/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/antagonists & inhibitors , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/pharmacology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects
14.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 283: 114738, 2022 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466608

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Medicinal importance and potential activity of Siddha herbal formulations have proved over several centuries against a wide range of causative agents as Influenza, Dengue, Chikungunya, and Tuberculosis. The traditional medicine system of Siddha is a valuable therapeutic approach for treating viral respiratory infections like Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and can be effectively employed to target the host response and preventive care to boost the immune system. Kaba Sura Kudineer (KSK), an official polyherbal formulation has been used in Siddha traditional medicine for centuries. However, the role of KSK in regulating inflammation and the underlying molecular mechanisms has remained elusive. AIM OF THE STUDY: The goal of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of KSK using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Raw 264.7 murine macrophage cells were used for this study. The Inflammatory mediators and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The NF-κB nulcear translocation and protein expression of iNOS, COX-2 was analyzed with westernblot. RESULTS: KSK supplementation decreased LPS mediated TLR-4 production and secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines including IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2 and PGE-2. Moreover, it inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and thereby inhibited the expression of iNOS in the cell. The Western blot analysis further confirmed that KSK strongly prevented the LPS-induced degradation of IκB which is normally required for the activation of NF-κB and hereby suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB. The protein expression of iNOS, COX-2 was significantly decreased with the presence of KSK treatment. Results suggested that KSK manipulates its anti-inflammatory effects mainly through blocking the TLR mediated NF-κB signal transduction pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Together, this study has proven that KSK could be a potential therapeutic drug for alleviating excessive inflammation in many inflammation-associated diseases like COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Inflammation/drug therapy , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Macrophages/drug effects , Medicine, Ayurvedic , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Dietary Supplements , Mice , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Phytotherapy , Plant Preparations/pharmacology , RAW 264.7 Cells , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 728896, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456291

ABSTRACT

A purified spike (S) glycoprotein of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) coronavirus was used to study its effects on THP-1 macrophages, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and HUVEC cells. The S protein mediates the entry of SARS-CoV-2 into cells through binding to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors. We measured the viability, intracellular cytokine release, oxidative stress, proinflammatory markers, and THP-1-like macrophage polarization. We observed an increase in apoptosis, ROS generation, MCP-1, and intracellular calcium expression in the THP-1 macrophages. Stimulation with the S protein polarizes the THP-1 macrophages towards proinflammatory futures with an increase in the TNFα and MHC-II M1-like phenotype markers. Treating the cells with an ACE inhibitor, perindopril, at 100 µM reduced apoptosis, ROS, and MHC-II expression induced by S protein. We analyzed the sensitivity of the HUVEC cells after the exposure to a conditioned media (CM) of THP-1 macrophages stimulated with the S protein. The CM induced endothelial cell apoptosis and MCP-1 expression. Treatment with perindopril reduced these effects. However, the direct stimulation of the HUVEC cells with the S protein, slightly increased HIF1α and MCP-1 expression, which was significantly increased by the ACE inhibitor treatment. The S protein stimulation induced ROS generation and changed the mitogenic responses of the PBMCs through the upregulation of TNFα and interleukin (IL)-17 cytokine expression. These effects were reduced by the perindopril (100 µM) treatment. Proteomic analysis of the S protein stimulated THP-1 macrophages with or without perindopril (100 µM) exposed more than 400 differentially regulated proteins. Our results provide a mechanistic analysis suggesting that the blood and vascular components could be activated directly through S protein systemically present in the circulation and that the activation of the local renin angiotensin system may be partially involved in this process. Graphical: Suggested pathways that might be involved at least in part in S protein inducing activation of inflammatory markers (red narrow) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) modulation of this process (green narrow).


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , COVID-19/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Perindopril/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Humans , Macrophages/drug effects , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/immunology , Pyroptosis/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
16.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 283: 114701, 2022 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446835

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Xuanfei Baidu Decoction (XFBD), one of the "three medicines and three prescriptions" for the clinically effective treatment of COVID-19 in China, plays an important role in the treatment of mild and/or common patients with dampness-toxin obstructing lung syndrome. AIM OF THE STUDY: The present work aims to elucidate the protective effects and the possible mechanism of XFBD against the acute inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis. METHODS: We use TGF-ß1 induced fibroblast activation model and LPS/IL-4 induced macrophage inflammation model as in vitro cell models. The mice model of lung fibrosis was induced by BLM via endotracheal drip, and then XFBD (4.6 g/kg, 9.2 g/kg) were administered orally respectively. The efficacy and molecular mechanisms in the presence or absence of XFBD were investigated. RESULTS: The results proved that XFBD can effectively inhibit fibroblast collagen deposition, down-regulate the level of α-SMA and inhibit the migration of fibroblasts. IL-4 induced macrophage polarization was also inhibited and the secretions of the inflammatory factors including IL6, iNOS were down-regulated. In vivo experiments, the results proved that XFBD improved the weight loss and survival rate of the mice. The XFBD high-dose administration group had a significant effect in inhibiting collagen deposition and the expression of α-SMA in the lungs of mice. XFBD can reduce bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by inhibiting IL-6/STAT3 activation and related macrophage infiltration. CONCLUSIONS: Xuanfei Baidu Decoction protects against macrophages induced inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis via inhibiting IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Inflammation/drug therapy , Macrophages/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Animals , Cell Survival/drug effects , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , NIH 3T3 Cells , Phytotherapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/prevention & control , RAW 264.7 Cells , STAT3 Transcription Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , STAT3 Transcription Factor/genetics , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism
17.
Acta Pharmacol Sin ; 42(11): 1913-1920, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437673

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is a dysregulated immune response to infection and potentially leads to life-threatening organ dysfunction, which is often seen in serious Covid-19 patients. Disulfiram (DSF), an old drug that has been used to treat alcohol addiction for decades, has recently been identified as a potent inhibitor of the gasdermin D (GSDMD)-induced pore formation that causes pyroptosis and inflammatory cytokine release. Therefore, DSF represents a promising therapeutic for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein with potent antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities that acts by neutralizing circulating endotoxins and activating cellular responses. In addition, LF has been well exploited as a drug nanocarrier and targeting ligands. In this study, we developed a DSF-LF nanoparticulate system (DSF-LF NP) for combining the immunosuppressive activities of both DSF and LF. DSF-LF NPs could effectively block pyroptosis and inflammatory cytokine release from macrophages. Treatment with DSF-LF NPs showed remarkable therapeutic effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. In addition, this therapeutic strategy was also applied to treat ulcerative colitis (UC), and substantial treatment efficacy was achieved in a murine colitis model. The underlying mode of action of these DSF-LF-NPs may contribute to efficiently suppressing macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and ameliorating the complications caused by sepsis and UC. As macrophage pyroptosis plays a pivotal role in inflammation, this safe and effective biomimetic nanomedicine may offer a versatile therapeutic strategy for treating various inflammatory diseases by repurposing DSF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis, Ulcerative , Disulfiram/pharmacokinetics , Lactoferrin , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Acetaldehyde Dehydrogenase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Biomimetic Materials/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Colitis, Ulcerative/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Disulfiram/pharmacology , Drug Carriers/pharmacology , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/pharmacology , Lactoferrin/metabolism , Lactoferrin/pharmacology , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use , Pyroptosis/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/metabolism , Treatment Outcome
18.
Bioorg Chem ; 116: 105346, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401246

ABSTRACT

Starting from the antimalarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, we conducted a structural optimization on the side chain of chloroquine by introducing amino substituted longer chains thus leading to a series of novel aminochloroquine derivatives. Anti-infectious effects against SARS-Cov2 spike glycoprotein as well as immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory activities of the new compounds were evaluated. Distinguished immunosuppressive activities on the responses of T cell, B cell and macrophages upon mitogen and pathogenic signaling were manifested. Compounds 9-11 displayed the most promising inhibitory effects both on cellular proliferation and on the production of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-17, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-1ß and TNF-α, which might be insightful in the pursuit of treatment for immune disorders and inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Amines/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Chloroquine/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Amines/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/chemical synthesis , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Chloroquine/chemical synthesis , Chloroquine/chemistry , Cytokines/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Molecular Structure , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
19.
FASEB J ; 35(9): e21870, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373669

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is often characterized by dysregulated inflammatory and immune responses. It has been shown that the Traditional Chinese Medicine formulation Qing-Fei-Pai-Du decoction (QFPDD) is effective in the treatment of the disease, especially for patients in the early stage. Our network pharmacology analyses indicated that many inflammation and immune-related molecules were the targets of the active components of QFPDD, which propelled us to examine the effects of the decoction on inflammation. We found in the present study that QFPDD effectively alleviated dextran sulfate sodium-induced intestinal inflammation in mice. It inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα, and promoted the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by macrophagic cells. Further investigations found that QFPDD and one of its active components wogonoside markedly reduced LPS-stimulated phosphorylation of transcription factor ATF2, an important regulator of multiple cytokines expression. Our data revealed that both QFPDD and wogonoside decreased the half-life of ATF2 and promoted its proteasomal degradation. Of note, QFPDD and wogonoside down-regulated deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 along with inducing ATF2 degradation. Inhibition of USP14 with the small molecular inhibitor IU1 also led to the decrease of ATF2 in the cells, indicating that QFPDD and wogonoside may act through regulating USP14 to promote ATF2 degradation. To further assess the importance of ubiquitination in regulating ATF2, we generated mice that were intestinal-specific KLHL5 deficiency, a CUL3-interacting protein participating in substrate recognition of E3s. In these mice, QFPDD mitigated inflammatory reaction in the spleen, but not intestinal inflammation, suggesting CUL3-KLHL5 may function as an E3 for ATF2 degradation.


Subject(s)
Activating Transcription Factor 2/metabolism , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Flavanones/pharmacology , Glucosides/pharmacology , Inflammation/drug therapy , Proteolysis/drug effects , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/deficiency , Animals , Cell Line , Colitis/chemically induced , Colitis/drug therapy , Cullin Proteins/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Dextran Sulfate/pharmacology , Dextran Sulfate/therapeutic use , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Flavanones/therapeutic use , Glucosides/therapeutic use , Inflammation/chemically induced , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Phosphorylation/drug effects , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/drug effects , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism , Pyrroles/pharmacology , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/antagonists & inhibitors , Ubiquitination
20.
Cell Rep ; 36(8): 109614, 2021 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370458

ABSTRACT

Zoonotic pathogens, such as COVID-19, reside in animal hosts before jumping species to infect humans. The Carnivora, like mink, carry many zoonoses, yet how diversity in host immune genes across species affect pathogen carriage is poorly understood. Here, we describe a progressive evolutionary downregulation of pathogen-sensing inflammasome pathways in Carnivora. This includes the loss of nucleotide-oligomerization domain leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLRs), acquisition of a unique caspase-1/-4 effector fusion protein that processes gasdermin D pore formation without inducing rapid lytic cell death, and the formation of a caspase-8 containing inflammasome that inefficiently processes interleukin-1ß. Inflammasomes regulate gut immunity, but the carnivorous diet has antimicrobial properties that could compensate for the loss of these immune pathways. We speculate that the consequences of systemic inflammasome downregulation, however, can impair host sensing of specific pathogens such that they can reside undetected in the Carnivora.


Subject(s)
Carnivora/metabolism , Evolution, Molecular , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Zoonoses/pathology , Animals , Caspase 1/genetics , Caspase 1/metabolism , Caspase 8/metabolism , Caspases, Initiator/genetics , Caspases, Initiator/metabolism , Cell Death , Cell Line , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , NLR Proteins/genetics , NLR Proteins/metabolism , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/biosynthesis , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Salmonella typhi/pathogenicity , Zoonoses/immunology , Zoonoses/parasitology
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